Using a temporary mooring - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
 Not a Member? 

Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 03-26-2007
TrueBlue's Avatar
Señor Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 4,853
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 12
TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough
Cuttyhunk Island has a pvc tube extention permanently mounted to the top of the Town mooring balls. The looped end of the mooring line slides freely through this tube to the chain swivel, several feet below the surface.



There are pluses and minuses to this setup. The loop is kept out of the water, therefore not covered in slime - easier on your hands and deck lines. It's also fairly easy to slip a line though with lower freeboard vessels in relatively calm conditions.

The problem with Cuttyhunk, is the predominately high winds - seemingly always piping up when we come in for a mooring. During these higher wind conditions and with our high bow freeboard, it's tough for the crew to snag it with a boat hook and pull the line up high enough to thread a line through.

During gale winds last year we snapped a hook in two and lost another overboard on another occasion.
__________________
True Blue . . .
sold the Nauticat

Last edited by TrueBlue; 03-26-2007 at 11:29 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 03-26-2007
hellosailor's Avatar
Plausible Deniability
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 10,611
Thanks: 2
Thanked 87 Times in 85 Posts
Rep Power: 10
hellosailor has a spectacular aura about hellosailor has a spectacular aura about
John-
Moorings can be funny animals. When I was learning to sail we went in for the first time, kissed the mooring ball dead on, and made it in one shot with no drama. Then the instructor said "Let's do it again" and it took a good half hour to do the second mooring.

The biggest thing to remember is that the mooring ball and lines rarely get to eat, so they will try to snare you keel and climb in between the rudder and hull while looking to swallow your prop and pull the shaft out of the boat. (Don't ask me how I know this.)

You need to get a little familiar with your boat and how she carries way, how long it takes to drift to a stop or reverse to one. Typically you will approach a mooring from dead downwind of it, and the goal is to come up dead slow (unless you're a pro) and then put your engine in neutral so you come to a dead stop just kissing the mooring. Then you run up to the bow and try to tie up before the wind pushes you off. "Good" moorings will have a whip float attached to the mooring pennants, so you can reach under your rail, pull the whip onboard (they like to poke at eyes) and then pull the mooring pennants off the whip and drop them on your bow cleats. If the pennants are just floating around in the water, they'll be harder to reach, you may need a boat hook. Good idea to have one regardless.

If you come up on the mooring too quickly--that's when it can wrap on the keel, rudder, or prop, and you may have to go swimming. So take your time.

If you want to make it easier for single-handing, and there is room in the mooring field, you can rig a dock line from your bow cleat, outside the stanchions, and back to the helm. Then you can motor up alongside the mooring (and again, it is better to be drifting with the engine in neutral!) grab the pennant, slip your dock line through it, and walk the line back up to the bow--all the while being attached to the mooring ball. Shorthanded with enough wind to keep pushing you off the ball, that's the only sure and simple way.

If you want some practice, take a big empty detergent bottle or something, tie an anchor on it, and throw it in the water someplace where you have room to practice.

And, you may want a 'drool rag' or a bucket handy to get the slime off your hands on the real thing.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 03-26-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Long Is.
Posts: 329
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
gc1111 is on a distinguished road
Two comments. 1) Really stop the boat when retrieving the mooring line. If there is any way left on, you will be surprised at how hard it pulls.
2) If you have an anchor on a bow roller, the mooring line will most likely interfere with it. Know what you will do. Many times I have had to remove the CQR from the bow roller and put it on deck. This takes a fair amount of effort in an awkward position, so if a female spouse is handling the bow, be ready to lend a hand.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 03-26-2007
TrueBlue's Avatar
Señor Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 4,853
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 12
TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough
We had front row seats to a very frightening mooring incident a few years ago, involving a Blue Seas 34 ft trawler and a 38 ft classic mahogany "Martha's Vineyard" picnic boat. This is a true story.

We took a mooring in Cuttyhunk Pond on a Friday morning, en route to the Vineyard the next morning and were relaxing with a couple of Bloody Marys. The mooring field was filled by midmorning - the beautiful, flag blue and mahogany picnic boat taking the last one, directly in front of us. Muffy (didn't know their real names, but this is a good guess ) was preparing some tea & biscuits to serve on their teak cockpit table, while Chad attended to shining his mahogany brightwork and bronze ports.

By early afternoon, our neighbor to our port left his mooring - probably taking a late start to Edgartown, when the Blue Seas trawler made an appearance on the fairway, further back from the newly available, last mooring. The captain and sole occupant, was on the flybridge and setting a fast course for the mooring.

Concurrently, another boat was heading for the same mooring as well - off to the trawler's port quarter, the race was on and most of the surrounding boaters were placing their bets. The trawler Capt. got there first, climbed down from his flybridge with a boat hook . . . only to miss the mooring ball on his first pass. To everyone's horror - he inadvertently left the engine in gear and it was moving at a fast clip toward Chad and Muffy. Chad jumped into his cockpit, just before the trawler's anchor pulpit (with no anchor visible) crashed through the house's mahogany panel - smashing the glass in a bronze portlight in the process. Chad screamed like a little girl, Muffy dropped the teapot, and a loud "Oh no!" echoed from everyone watching.

Capt. trawler got back up to the helm, pushed the throttle into reverse and tore a large section of mahogany away from the picnic boat. The wind was whipping at 20+ knots and the singlehanded Capt. was in obvious trouble - couldn’t pick up the mooring and no onboard anchor.

I saved the day by jumping into my dinghy, motored to the teak swim platform and tied up to the idling trawler while it was drifting in the fairway. Another boater in his dinghy showed up at the bow, I handed a dock line down to him, we tired her off and the Capt. finally killed the engine.

Poor old guy - with tears in his eyes, told me how he lost his wife last season but thought he could make a quick morning run to Cuttyhunk. Chad and he eventually worked out some settlement, but Chad was clearly, deeply distraught. That was the buzz on the Pond for the rest of the afternoon.
__________________
True Blue . . .
sold the Nauticat
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 03-26-2007
ReverendMike's Avatar
Mostly Harmless
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: S. Central MO
Posts: 885
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
ReverendMike will become famous soon enough
Never mind

TB
Up until I read your post, I was about to recommend that PB take someone out and practice 'double handed' first. But after that story, uh, no. Practice it like you'll do it makes more sense.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

"... the only matter of consequence before me is what I will do with my alloted time. I can remain on shore, paralyzed with fear, or I can raise my sails and dip and soar in the breeze." - Richard Bode, First you have to row a little boat (pg. 94)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 03-26-2007
Valiente's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueBlue
I've picked moorings up when singlehanded, by steering the boat alongside the mooring - reversing enough to counter current, wind and boat momentum, then snagging with my boat hook. It's simple, but as with everything sail related, just takes a little practice.
Very true. When the new boat went to the dock, the old boat went to a mooring in a mooring field...a first for us...and it took some co-ordination between foredeck and crew...plus a good sense of exactly where "head to wind" was, in order to grab the mooring line.

I actually found it easier to employ True Blue's solo method, because you can maneuver the boat and actually *see* the mooring if you run alongside (and upwind) of it.

A good practice if you have crew hooking on is to learn how far your boat will go at dead slow or in neutral (coasting) in a given wind. Then you can visualize somewhat where the mooring is as if your boat is transparent. This will shortly get you nearly stationary within arm's reach of your crew, and will lead to less shouting...unheard shouting as you are back near the engine and the crew is shouting at the mooring. Unless you have the wit to use family band walkie-talkies (anchoring and mooring are the best use for these devices, in my opinion).

Finally, we have learned how to saill OFF the mooring (not quite ON yet) and I must say that hoisting the main and ghosting off until you can turn out of a harbour or a basin is a very pleasant way to start a sail.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 03-26-2007
Valiente's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailortjk1
Just be careful if you are the mooring for an extended period of time or if conditions deteriorate. When on the mooring for extended periods it is best to have a special mooring rig made. It consists of a swivel shackle and usually two mooring lines. The lines have thimbles spliced into the eyes, which are permanently spliced onto the shackle. The shackle is than attached to the mooring ball with a large clevis pin.
Like I said, short periods of time are ok, but any length of time or heavy weather and the simple line through the ball will chafe and break. Overnight in calm conditions, you’ll be just fine.
I have two 3/4" three-strand lines with thimble and chain with moused shackles. I run them through chocks to well-backed deck cleats and I use chafe gear at the chocks. I need to get a swivel shackle, as a few days of rotating lows and hence around the compass winds can rapidly make this a mess.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 03-26-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 10 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
If you're singlehanding and need to pick up a mooring, it may be easier to run the line through a bow chock, and then aft to the cockpit. Then come up to the mooring ball so that you can catch it with a boat hook from the cockpit. Then you can attach the line to the mooring ball, and let the boat drop back. Generally, once on the mooring, you can go forward at your leisure and take the slack out of the mooring line.

This is usually easier than trying to judge coming up to the mooring ball and trying to go forward, and catch it...

Wearing gloves is never a bad idea... some of the nasty growth on the mooring pennants that have been sitting in the water can cut your hands up pretty badly if your not wearing gloves.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 03-26-2007 at 10:31 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 03-26-2007
Owner, Green Bay Packers
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SW Michigan
Posts: 10,318
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice
I try to sail on, and off, my mooring. Admittedly, I do not have other boats near me, and so, why not? One thing I have picked up from this may be of use. When under power, I approach the mooring ball the same as I would under sail. I refer to speed and set/drift here. As a result of this approach, I always have my lunch hook made ready. When the engine fails, or the prop is fouled, you'll be in the same situation as if you came in under sail-without the sails to bail you out. The sail area of the boat alone is enough to ruin your day in that situation, having an anchor ready will allow you to regroup before you're aground or swapping glass.

I prefer picking up from the bow, single-handing, if possible. All the bad things that can foul are aft of midships. Mis-judging your approach, and realizing it while on the bow, means back to the cockpit for adjustment or another approach. Mis-judging while trying to pick up from aft may mean getting blown down across the mooring and fouling on keel or worse. But it is sometimes the only way to do it while alone.

An idea not mentioned yet, and rarely seen done for reasons that escape me, is making a pass through the mooring. A dry run, if you will. Motor on in, cut the motor where you think appropriate, and see how she handles. The unseen tide may be doing things to you that the visible wind is not. If everything is going "just ducky", hook the mooring and be done with it. If things are looking a little squirelly, make a mental note on a different approach on the next pass. Too many make the mistake of thinking they're Sir Francis Drake picking up his mooring off the Lizard with the monarch watching. The minor caution involved in a couple of passes is nothing to the chagrin felt when things go really bad, as illustrated by TrueBlue's experience.

The bleach bottle idea is excellent. I would put it on a cement block or something, and leave it out. Then, each time you go out, you can stop on the way in and pick up your "mooring", under a variety of conditions. IMHO, this will give you a lot better practise than just spending a whole morning under static conditions will.

I second the opinion of practising alone. Another person along, even just standing by the anchor, will make you behave differently. Maybe the first couple times, but then ditch them and practise on your own.
__________________
“Scientists are people who build the Brooklyn Bridge and then buy it.”
Wm. F. Buckley, Jr.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 03-27-2007
hellosailor's Avatar
Plausible Deniability
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 10,611
Thanks: 2
Thanked 87 Times in 85 Posts
Rep Power: 10
hellosailor has a spectacular aura about hellosailor has a spectacular aura about
"The bleach bottle idea.. I would put it on a cement block or something, and leave it out. "

How about, put it on a lobstah pot, and check for dinner while you're out there?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mooring Equipment question Dcneuro Bristol 0 11-08-2006 08:39 AM
Mediterranean Mooring John Kretschmer Seamanship Articles 0 12-22-2003 07:00 PM
Temporary Moorings Dan Dickison Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 07-21-2002 08:00 PM
The Mechanics of Mooring Mark Matthews Seamanship Articles 0 05-19-2002 08:00 PM
Mooring RobGallagher General Discussion (sailing related) 4 03-02-2002 04:59 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:32 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.