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rperret 06-18-2007 10:23 PM

anchoring question
 
Basic question - i have now moved to a boat that has two bow cleats - Port/Stbd, as opposed to a single bow cleat.

Question - for short term anchoring - what is best way to secure the rode? it seems that if you would attach to one cleat, the boat would sit off angle to the wind.

Thx

sailingdog 06-18-2007 11:14 PM

If you don't want the boat to sit off angle to the wind, use an anchor snubber bridle... I wouldn't really worry about it... many boats will sit at anchor better if they're only anchored by one side, since they'll tend to sail a bit less at anchor then.

sailaway21 06-19-2007 12:50 AM

I assume that you mean chocks and not cleats? Or maybe you do mean cleats, I dunno. The truth is that it don't really make a damn bit of difference but, if you want to stay with tradition, use the port in the northern hemisphere and the stbd in the southern hemisphere.

camaraderie 06-19-2007 12:58 AM

Make a bridle and tie it to both cleats...if you sail at anchor rig a small steadying sail that will keep you into the wind. Like this:
Banner Bay Marine - News & Articles
http://www.bannerbaymarine.com/image...wpointer01.jpg

Craig Smith 06-19-2007 08:20 AM

I like sailingdog's reply.

If it's too much of an angle, use a bridle. Or work out a way of leaving the rode over the bow-roller.

TrueBlue 06-19-2007 08:49 AM

I made up a snubber with double lines spliced to a chain hook for use whenever anchoring out. It takes the strain off our windlass, especially when powersetting the anchor.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v1...berCloseup.gif

Although not representative of our bow pulpit, this drawing illustrates how the snubber is used:


SanderO 07-12-2007 10:45 PM

I use a all chain and for a snubber a 3/4" nylon line with a heavy rubber snubber to absorb shock. When I set the anchor I wait until the bow point to windward or where the anchor is set (when there is no odd currents). Normally the wind will blow the bow off if I am not making way... when the anchor sets it pulls the bow to windward. This is the first sign the hook has set.

Next I take the snubber line, already cleated off to one of the bow cleats and hook the chain hook on the chain and let out more chain. This pulls the snubber line with the rubber snubber over the bow robber. I let out enough chain so that the load is now taken by the nylon snubber line. The excess chain drops into the water. Both the chain and the snubber of being led over the bow roller. I usually lift the now slack chain to the side.

To achieve a fail lead on the snubber I run it around the drum of my vertical windlass similar to the set up in the post above.

There is no chafe on the snubber line as there is when you use a bridle and the boat shears about through the eye of the wind... which mine tends to due (though lessened by a riding sail). I also have a stainless stem fitting with some bolt heats which can chafe a line pulling across the bow.

To retrieve the anchor I simple use the windlass and it pulls the chain hook of the snubber right over the roller. I stop the windlass and unhook the chain hook and snubber and continue retrieving the chain.

I have been very successful with this approach on my boat.

One interesting aspect of the rubber snubber is that is a clear telltale that the hook is set. As the pressure on the rode increase you can see the rubber lengthen. If the hook is dragging the rubber snubber will not elongate as there is not enough force on the slipping anchor rode

jef
sv shiva

sailingdog 07-12-2007 11:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SanderO
I use a all chain and for a snubber a 3/4" nylon line with a heavy rubber snubber to absorb shock. When I set the anchor I wait until the bow point to windward or where the anchor is set (when there is no odd currents). Normally the wind will blow the bow off if I am not making way... when the anchor sets it pulls the bow to windward. This is the first sign the hook has set.

The size/diameter of the nylon line is dependent on the size of the boat.

Quote:

Next I take the snubber line, already cleated off to one of the bow cleats and hook the chain hook on the chain and let out more chain. This pulls the snubber line with the rubber snubber over the bow robber. I let out enough chain so that the load is now taken by the nylon snubber line. The excess chain drops into the water. Both the chain and the snubber of being led over the bow roller. I usually lift the now slack chain to the side.

To achieve a fail lead on the snubber I run it around the drum of my vertical windlass similar to the set up in the post above.
Most windlasses aren't designed to take the repetitive shock loading of an anchor rode. You should probably be leading the snubber to a mooring bitt or cleat.

Quote:

There is no chafe on the snubber line as there is when you use a bridle and the boat shears about through the eye of the wind... which mine tends to due (though lessened by a riding sail). I also have a stainless stem fitting with some bolt heats which can chafe a line pulling across the bow.
You should be using a woven chafe guard of some sort for the snubber IMHO. If the snubber breaks suddenly, the shock load when the chain comes up short could break something on the boat or it could rip the anchor from the sea bottom, and leave your boat dragging.

Quote:

To retrieve the anchor I simple use the windlass and it pulls the chain hook of the snubber right over the roller. I stop the windlass and unhook the chain hook and snubber and continue retrieving the chain.

I have been very successful with this approach on my boat.

One interesting aspect of the rubber snubber is that is a clear telltale that the hook is set. As the pressure on the rode increase you can see the rubber lengthen. If the hook is dragging the rubber snubber will not elongate as there is not enough force on the slipping anchor rode

jef
sv shiva
The rubber snubber has to be sized properly for it to work as an indicator of the anchor being set properly. If it is undersized, it will elongate regardless of the hook being set properly. If it is oversized, it may not elongate when the hook is properly set.

Sapperwhite 07-12-2007 11:56 PM

ABI makes an item called the Chain Grabber. I use it and lead the two bridle lines back through my hawse pipes to the samson posts(or cleats in your case). The grabber is really heavy duty.Works great for me.

270077

Boasun 07-13-2007 01:14 PM

Remember Folks!! When you do set your Anchor. Be sure that the Bitter End of your Anchor Rode is secured to the boat. Or it will be all for naught on anchoring. LOL


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