What's your biggest bonehead move sailing? - Page 14 - SailNet Community
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post #131 of 591 Old 09-28-2007
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Dang! I'm surprised you kept sailing. Ah, ya didn't need her anyway right?
Actually, that event had nothing to do with eventual demise of our marriage but you're right, i didn't need her anyway.

My current wife is new to sailing I hope it goes better this time.
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post #132 of 591 Old 09-30-2007
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This has been a wonderful thread. Couple of my personal lessons - 1: when rushed to leave a dock to make a tide always make sure the water hose is filling the water tank rather than the diesel tank. (Although this is better than the alternative.) 2: When heading south out of NY Harbor, don't tell the guest to leave the Statue of Liberty to starboard and go below to make lunch. The Lady is on an island and keeping her to starboard as you go around will put you right on a sandbar to the south on Columbus Day in a falling tide with all the CG, NY Waterpolice and Park Police boats and helicopters (plus tours, ferries, rec boats) available to offer helpful hints. At least, as we came completely dry on the sandbar with the topsides on the bar, I noticed we hadn't settled on either the cement slabs or rusted ironworks usuallly 7 feet below water...


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post #133 of 591 Old 10-01-2007
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My wife and Iwent out sailing with a work aquaintance of my wife's (also our financial 'engineer') - just both couple's aboard on thier liveaboard 43 ft Voyage catamaran. On the way out one of the diesel's overheated so we went to a single engine; while troubleshooting that I noticed that the husband and wife team relied on Auto as a skipper more than I would have (we were on the South river near Annapolis, in August, not exactly void of traffic).
Anyway we go out, slowly sail across the bay and back. I've never been there before so I have the skipper point out the river mouth,from a mile or so out. He sets the course, slaps on the auto and goes back to socializing - we're sailing away at about 3-4 kts on a close reach. Cruise mode, no sail trim no skipper.
After a while he ducked into the cabin to muck about for something and while he was inside I stepped from the back of the cockpit to the helm and unobtrusively peeked under the jib. I noticed the red spider mark (huge triple piling) about 200 yards forward on a collision course. I yelled out to the owner what I saw and that I was changing course to Port(towards the center of the river) by 15degrees - he acknowledged that, and then I did so.
I picked up my drink, and proceded to the back of the cockpit. Meanwhile the wives were sitting on the port side conversing - the owners wife with a clear view forward.
The owner came out with hamburgers and proceded to the gas bar-b- que on the stern - never looking, oblivious.
We smacked into the piling on the starboard corner of the forward crossbeam - the owners wife and I went forward while the owner cranked the engine and backed us off - we and only noted a tar smudge (we were looking at the wrong place as it turns out - we looked at the port side, we hit on the starboard - four feet of leeway less and we would have cleared the bouy.
I felt terrible because I should have known that I was the only one paying attention (I had experience with similar Catamarans but up until this point had never sailed on this one). I commented I'd make it right (thinking it was compounding off some tar), while the owner was giving me at ration about not paying attention.
Turns out the forward crossbeam was dented and bent six inches deep, the fiberglass on the starboard bow had three of four tearing rips and had almost separated from the beam - but we didn't truly notice that until I went forward to look - AFTER tying up the boat to the pier, the owners wife had pratically stood on the ripped up section to tie up the boat and not noticed it. Getting to be a theme here isn't it....
oh, yeah, we continued sailing with that damage, oblivious to all...Wonder how much ripping and bending occured because of that 400 sq ft jib pulling away...
6 weeks or so later, I get an email with a bill for 7500 bucks - the total cost to repair. I'm nice, but not rich. I asked the owner what he thought my fair share was. He said 100% as I was sailing the boat. Two weeks of emails getting more and more contenious and he never once took any of the responsibility (or decreased his demand for 100% of the bill) and I finally told him bugger off, take a course on responsibility at sea and grow up.

Needless to say, I paid nothing - except now I NEVER, EVER take the helm of someone elses boat - so I paid nothing in cash, a lot in LIFE.

The bone headed part - I went sailing with him in the first place. Considering the fact that he lives on the boat, goes to the Bahama's 6 months of the year etc.. the boat was dirty, poorly maintained and inadequately skipped. I never once asked were the PFD's were or other safety gear. He was a a**hole, I was a bone head because I exposed myself and my wife to his level of safety at sea.

JG - hope you subscribe, I'm talking about you

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post #134 of 591 Old 10-01-2007
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Took a newbie sailing this weekend. (The wife's friend who flew in from Seattle to go sailing)
He wanted to spend all weekend on board, fine with me I said.
Saturday was a good day logged 32 NM's floating around. It started slow, but we made the best of it. By the end of the evening we were beam reaching at around 5knots.
The newbie on board says, "I want it real rough! I want storms! I want thunder and lightning!" I told him to be preppared because the nexts days forecast (Sunday) called for choppy 5-7 foot seas.
So the next day we are out in the choppy seas (I have video I will try and post at a later date), the newbie is hooping and hollering, waves are crashing, and we are beating along at 6.5 - 7.2. All is good for about an hour, I'm having a blast. Than he says to me "Do I look green?"
I say no, "You look more White than Green. Did you take the Ginger capsels I gave you?" "Yes, I did......... " Right before he brings up his breakfast.
My bone headed move, taking a newbie out in choppy seas. I always do that. Should have left him on shore.

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If a man is to be obsessed by something, I suppose a boat is as good as anything, perhaps a bit better than most - E.B. White
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post #135 of 591 Old 10-01-2007
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Depends on the newbie. I took my friend's teen-age son out on a pretty choppy day, where it was blowing about 20 knots, and we had an absolute blast.

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #136 of 591 Old 10-03-2007
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You call this fun?!?!

Our first boat, a Chrysler 22, was a great boat; heavy, forgiving, etc. It was our first year, indeed, our first few weeks after purchase, on her. We went to Crooked Island, roughly a four hour run along the coast, to spend the weekend with some friends. They had a Hunter 235. We had a great time and all too soon it was time to head for home. There was little wind so I knew we would have to motor most of the way (Johnson 6hp 2 stroke, aka "gas eater") It was a bit rough and we were bouncing along when I decided to check the fuel level. Hmmm, it sure feels light. Uh oh, I didn't think we would have enough to get back in. My wife gives me one of those loving affectionate looks. She is already white knuckled and this just added to the pucker factor. I hoist the sails in the freshening wind and we are getting bounced around alot. My wife looks over at me after about an hour of this and says, in her soft sweet voice, "You call this fun?!? I am NOT having fun!!" Right then and there I start swearing to her that I will sell the boat as soon as we get back. "Ohhhhh Noooo! I am not going to be the one to "crush" your dream! YOU ARE NOT SELLING THIS BOAT!"

We make it back, the only damage is to my pride. Mental note to self, "check fuel level before every trip."

A few weeks later, we go back to the same place for another weekend. Another great time. We start back. Did I mention that the pass out of Crooked Island is named "Hurricane Pass"? We enter the pass. Our friends in their boat are about 500 yards in front of us. The wind is a brisk 20 knots. The sease in the pass are maybe 9 to 10 feet and quick! When in the trough, we loose sight of our friends mast. When cresting, we get air under the keel and then slammmm down with a crash to head down the back side of each wave. I am holding on for dear life to the tiller with one hand and the lifeline with the other. With great trepidation, I steal a glance at my wife on the other side of the cockpit. She is clamly reading a magazine! What a difference a few weeks makes.
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post #137 of 591 Old 10-03-2007
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I hope you realize that you've lucked out and gotten one of the better wives in the deal... and are properly thankful of that fact....
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Our first boat, a Chrysler 22, was a great boat; heavy, forgiving, etc. It was our first year, indeed, our first few weeks after purchase, on her. We went to Crooked Island, roughly a four hour run along the coast, to spend the weekend with some friends. They had a Hunter 235. We had a great time and all too soon it was time to head for home. There was little wind so I knew we would have to motor most of the way (Johnson 6hp 2 stroke, aka "gas eater") It was a bit rough and we were bouncing along when I decided to check the fuel level. Hmmm, it sure feels light. Uh oh, I didn't think we would have enough to get back in. My wife gives me one of those loving affectionate looks. She is already white knuckled and this just added to the pucker factor. I hoist the sails in the freshening wind and we are getting bounced around alot. My wife looks over at me after about an hour of this and says, in her soft sweet voice, "You call this fun?!? I am NOT having fun!!" Right then and there I start swearing to her that I will sell the boat as soon as we get back. "Ohhhhh Noooo! I am not going to be the one to "crush" your dream! YOU ARE NOT SELLING THIS BOAT!"

We make it back, the only damage is to my pride. Mental note to self, "check fuel level before every trip."

A few weeks later, we go back to the same place for another weekend. Another great time. We start back. Did I mention that the pass out of Crooked Island is named "Hurricane Pass"? We enter the pass. Our friends in their boat are about 500 yards in front of us. The wind is a brisk 20 knots. The sease in the pass are maybe 9 to 10 feet and quick! When in the trough, we loose sight of our friends mast. When cresting, we get air under the keel and then slammmm down with a crash to head down the back side of each wave. I am holding on for dear life to the tiller with one hand and the lifeline with the other. With great trepidation, I steal a glance at my wife on the other side of the cockpit. She is clamly reading a magazine! What a difference a few weeks makes.

Sailingdog

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #138 of 591 Old 10-03-2007
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Charlie Cobra --- you started a classic!
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post #139 of 591 Old 10-03-2007
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Lucky me

Absolutely am lucky. Tomorow night, we are leaving about 8:00 PM for a night sail to Apalachicola. Our first night sail. It's about 14 hours. Luckily, we are going in a flotilla of three other boats. Only one skipper has extensive experience, so he is the leader of the pack, as it were. I hope I can sleep tonite, I am so excited. 55 years old and feeling like a teenager about to get "lucky" for the first time. Hopefully, I will not be adding to this thread on Monday except to say we are back safe.

Let's see...checklist...yeah...that's the ticket...batteries for flashlights, check...full fuel tank, check...double check...note to self, remember to disconnect the shore power cord...towing insurance paid up, check
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post #140 of 591 Old 10-03-2007
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Sonofasailorsailing-

I hope you have checked the running lights on your boat, and have jacklines, tethers and harnesses for you and your better half. I fully believe that you should be tied into the boat if you're out at night... night-time MOBs are no fun...

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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