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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #181  
Old 01-06-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgmartis View Post
I keep my boat on a trailer at the lake.
Lucky you're on a lake, some of us have done that with the tide just turned and on the way in .

Andre
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  #182  
Old 01-06-2008
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Red face I wasn't going to touch this, but .......

When I was younger I had both a small sailboat and my "play" powerboat (Outboard).

One night it was a full moon and we were partying when this girl said she always wanted to water ski in the nude. Well we were more than willing to make her dream come true. There were plenty of "spotters" to keep an eye on her and I had this light for her to wear in case she crashed, she turn it on to help find. But, full moon it was like day time.

When we were finished instead of tying up at the end of the dock I just beached the boat and we all went back in the house to finish off the beer.

The next morning a buddy wakes me up saying my boat was swamped. The automatic bilge pump did not come on. So, him and me went down to the boat to fix. He was holding the battery so I could reconnect the wires.

I was young, remember? I only had two hands and decided my mouth work as a third hand to hold a wire. My friend start yelling; "No, No, No"! Too late, I stuck that wire in my mouth standing in the water and my hangover was cured. I was lucky it not kill me.

That was the stupidest, bonehead thing I ever done. After that I learned to keep a few small strips of "Duck Tape" on my nose to grab when I needed to stick something to hold as my third hand.

I doubt anyone here can top that for the "Bonehead Award"
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Last edited by Gryzio; 01-06-2008 at 10:46 AM.
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  #183  
Old 01-06-2008
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Gryzio-

Why didn't you put the GROUND wire in your mouth... That would have been much, much safer... but you probably wouldn't have learned as much..
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #184  
Old 01-06-2008
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Talking I was standing on ground in the water

After that I never going to put any wires in my mouth.

Even when they not connected to anything.
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  #185  
Old 01-06-2008
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One of mine...

It was June, several years ago. I had finally got insurance on the boat, and was eager to get out and start sailing.

Down to the marina, do the checks, get the engine started, do all the prep work for enjoying the day. It was my first ever sailboat (although between naval experience and motorboats - the only big hurdle I had was the actual sailing factor). And this would be the only second time taking "Amante" out. I had refrained from doing so without insurance as I had always been trailer sailor - and being in a fancy dancy marina and all - it seemed prudent to well - wait.


So with all systems checked, I jump off - toss off the lines - the boat hook is at the ready. Start the backing out process, when to my dismay - I am suddenly not going backwards but towards my port side where there was a larger 35 footer... Realizing with increase of power, that nothing good was happening - and having to reach for the boat hook to push off the neighbors boat. I try to forward and get back to a point I can nab one of the mooring cleats...

At that point - amidst the panic phase: The gentleman that owned the boat next to mine came out onto the pier and yelled:

"Do you mind if I cast you off"...

I had left the storm line attached...
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  #186  
Old 01-17-2008
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Back in my powerboat days I cruised my 35 Mainship from Albany, NY to the FL Keys, following the ICW from Norfolk down.

One afternoon we were cruising past Hilton Head when a squall-line began approaching from the SW. We ducked into a creek and went up it aways and anchored in 12 ft. of water. The anchor held nicely as the storm raced through, so we decided to spend the night.

Because it was nice and calm and dinner wouldn't be for a couple hours, I figured that this was a pretty good time to crawl below decks to replace the impeller in my generator's water pump. By the time I climbed back up on deck, it was almost dark.

As I sat down to supper, I noticed that the boat felt funny. When I went out on deck I was dismayed to see that nearly all the 12 ft. of water I had anchored in was gone! Duh! I had anchored when the tide was high and Hilton Head enjoys nearly a 12 ft tidal range. Fortunately, none of the folks in the houses along the creek could witness our stupidity because it was dark.

When the rising tide floated us free the following morning, we raised anchor and tried to look dignified as we left the creek. Thankfully, the boat suffered no damage from lying on the soft bottom.

What did I learn? Pay attention to tidal ranges!
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  #187  
Old 01-17-2008
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There is just too much 'good stuff' here to ignore or for that matter, even read through at this point. Much of it is amusing but mostly it is educational for each and everyone of us who admit to our sophomoric learning experiences. Since I can't top Robert Gainer in trying to sail across a hurricane and some of the other near death or possible Darwin awards I will only offer that I have broken a mast on a power line (lucky the mast broke and not the power line!) with a trailer sailor, I know a lot more about moorings and securing my boat in a blow and have seen what chafing will do to a single line mooring pendant (yup, my boat was riding free in 40kt winds in the western Sound bashing up someone's dock with her expensive furling unit), nearly lost the same boat due to a leaking stuffing box, gone to look for my 19' Lightning that was attached to a 15# 'river anchor' only to find her washed up safely on shore in a salt marsh, left the jib up on the same Lightning when a thunderstorm came through when I had beached the boat (yup, it sailed away and tipped over and drove the mast into the clean harbor mud - at least we found clams in the mud when digging it out), and those are only the highlights without all the set up and ambiance.
I think what is most important about this thread is that we learn from each set back and our stupidity level decreases as we become more aware of all the possible pitfalls. I think it was John Vigor who talked about a sailor's Black Box where you keep all your little pearls of learned wisdom and safety that will hopefully guide you the right way the next time. As long as you keep coming back to sailing there will always be a next time (corollary of Murphy's Law - even though Murphy was an optimist, just not the dinghy sailor type).
It is good to be alive.
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  #188  
Old 01-22-2008
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Lesson packed day

The admiral and our one year old were a bit under the weather so I decided to take my three year old out for a nice overnight trip. We got to the mooring and found that I had not shut off the batteries and a light in the V-berth had been left on so no power. Lesson 1. Alone with my daughter I decided to not try the trip powerless so I got a jump from the marina. I did power the boat about an hour to get some charge and raised sails before we hit the broad part of the lake. There was a steady 25 knots gusting to 35 on the nose and with the 25 mile fetch the waves were sizable.

As I was adjusting to how the boat felt (our first season with this boat) my three year old daughter looked at me and said "daddy I have to go pee" Lesson 2. This was when my parenting and and sailing lives began to merge. I locked the wheel as best I could and hustled her to the head and ran back and forth as I could. Up until then I had seen no reason to set up the boat's autopilot. I thought using an autopilot on a lake no matter how big was frivilous. Lesson 3. It's not. It's just smart.

Because of our late start due to sickness at home and the dead battery and wind on the nose in the direction we were heading I knew it would be dark when we reached our objective. In order to try to save a little time and one tack I started the engine to point a little higher and avoid a fourth (or was it fifth?) tack and managed to accomplish that goal. But in the 3 minutes or so the engine ran I sucked air as we were heeled pretty good and stalled the engine. Lesson 4. Don't cheat.

So we eventually made the harbor and dropped one anchor under sail blew down on it and used the main to creep forward and set a second anchor as the winds were to remain pretty high that night. I served my daughter juice, crackers, cheese and boat candy for dinner that night. It is still by far her favorite dinner ever because she had a free hand in the boat candy bag.

I bled the engine the next morning took my daughter ashore for a good breakfast following the boat candy dinner and she promptly ordered choclate chip pancakes. The waitress was in cahoots with her so I could not countermand her order. Lesson 5.

I was not going to post because I could only think about the time I tried to tow our dyer dink with the mast up - we were only moving a few hundred yards, but forgot I had the centerboard down and fliped the dink and broke the mast. Know anyone wanting to part with a mast for a dyer 10'?

I loved the lessons in this thread. I should review it before the boat splashes this spring.

LH

Last edited by lharmon; 01-22-2008 at 11:17 PM.
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  #189  
Old 01-23-2008
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as i was prepping to set sail i watched a couple of guys come into the marina on a pontoon boat(brand new) it was working hard to get 3 knots and sat kind of low in the water for its kind when they approached the ramp with the trailer still tethered to the boat???
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  #190  
Old 01-23-2008
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That`s a funny one! I heard something similar to that when I was out in San Diego... Perhaps it is more common of a problem than powerboat owners want to admit!
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