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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #281  
Old 08-19-2009
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Ouch pac - that'll leave a mark! Welcome to SN dude.
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  #282  
Old 08-19-2009
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Ouch... Funny how them things get tangled in things they shouldn't... Nice to see this thread still active.
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  #283  
Old 08-22-2009
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Painful to my ego

We were on a trip up to Desolation Sound from Vancouver. Me, my wife, my 2 young daughters and a good friend. We made it up to Lund where we stopped at the public warf for a shower and quick trip to the store. Before leaving my wife asked if we should get some fuel since we were right beside a fuel dock (know where this is going?) I said we should be fine having 1/4 tank and not far to go. We went and anchored for the night and talked about where to go the next day. I had thought we all agreed to go up to Pendrell sound and do some swiming in what is supposed to be the warmest water north of Mexico (complete lies I say). We got there and it turned out nobody wanted to swim in the rain and cold. Oh well I knew a good fishing spot outside of Gorge harbour and having a new downrigger my friend and I wanted to hook into some nice sized salmon for dinner. As we passed Refuge cove (another spot for fuel) I checked the gauge and still had between 1/4 and E. So we pressed on. As we passed the channel to gorge harbor I called the marina to see if we could tie up for the night and what time the fuel dock closed. No space and fuel was closed in an hour. No big deal we can anchor and get fuel in the am. So we start fishing around the outside of marina Island with nothing but rock fish, it was time to head in. Wind was about 5-6 knots and I thought we should sail up to the entrance and use our remaining fuel to get in and anchored. Wind died and we are really close to the reef. I started the engine and motored out around the reef and back into some wind. Engine died. Out of fuel. I knew it was going to happen. Oh well we are a sailboat right? Wind died. I talked about dropping the anchor should we start to drift into the reef but luckily we were still making 1.5 kts away from the reef. I called the coast gaurd on ch.83 and explained the problem and said we needed assistance into the harbour and to get anchored. They sent out the fast response vessel and towed us in. There was a big spot open on the fuel dock so when I said that they probably don't want a boat docked there for the night. The coast gaurd replied " Nobody tells the coast gaurd where to dock a boat". Awesome! But pretty easy for people to figure out what happened when you get towed in to the fuel dock. Oh well got some nice pictures of my boat under tow and I learned how to bleed the fuel system at 1:00am. The rest of the trip went awesome and we did get some nice salmon in the next few days.

P.S.
As I was buying everyone dinner it turned out the fuel dock manager was there and came over and loudly asked if we were the sailboat at the fuel dock that ran out of fuel. But he came down at 10 o'clock and gave me fuel. Still pretty embarasing.
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  #284  
Old 09-04-2009
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Hi Everyone,

I've been lurking for a while and enjoyed many of the stories in this thread so I thought I would share some of my own. This is my first post.

I sail a Precision 15K, a small boat with a fixed keel that draws about 18". It's trailerable and most of my boneheaded moves center around the trailering aspect. For example:

Once I was launching from the town ramp in Duxbury, MA. Beautiful bay there, great sailing. Anyway the tide was on its way in but still fairly low so I had to back pretty far out to the portion of the ramp where the pitch is not as steep. I got as far in as I could without getting the car too wet (there were bubbles coming out the exhaust pipe) and still the bunks on the trailer were not completely submerged but I figured that I could just give it a little shove and it would float off. I unhooked the trailer winch and the safety chain and began pushing on the bow. It didn't budge so I pushed harder and still no go. A couple of local guys (did I mention I was visiting?) saw me struggling and offered to help. Well the three of us pushed and rocked the boat and just couldn't manage to get her to float. After a couple of minutes of this I noticed that I had forgotten to undo the tie-downs to the trailer. I pulled forward, untied those lines and backed up to the same spot, then I gave one easy shove and she floated off sweet as you please. The guys were nice about it. They clapped me on the back and said "Don't feel too bad, I've done stuff like that before." I was pretty embarrassed though.

Another time I looked up into the trees at home and saw that there was a nice breeze so I decided to go sailing. I hitched up the trailer and loaded on the mast, boom, sail bag, outboard, tool kit, pfds, cooler full of ice and drinks, wife and dog and headed out on the 1 hour plus drive to the lake. Once there I got the mast up, sails bent on, outboard mounted, dog walked and I did one last check to make sure I was ready to launch. It was at this point that I realized that I had left the rudder in my garage. I de-rigged the boat, drove it home, went straight to my room and cried into my pillow.

Well that's it for now. I'm sure that more will come to me.

Cheers,
Bob

Last edited by CaptFoolhardy; 09-04-2009 at 10:48 PM.
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  #285  
Old 09-05-2009
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Which ones to talk about?

I have two that deal with Nonsuch 30 masts alone.

1. Coming out of the Welland Canal in Lake Erie many years ago, we have a freighter coming out of the lock after us (they did that back then) and a laker waiting to go in the lock and I have the chart book open on the seat next to me and there should be a green spar buoy here somewhere close that we go around and then turn into the marina and ... BONG hit it head on - it was hiding right behind the rather wide mast of the Nonsuch. We hit it with our very substantial anchor platform and it came up right beside the cockpit but our quarter wave stopped it from hitting us again (or us hitting it to be more accurate), no damage at all but really got my attention.

2. Went through the Erie Canal and arrived at the Castleton Boat Club to put the mast up. (Beyond the theme of Nonsuch masts, there is an additional one - if I stayed on Lake Ontario none of these things would happen.) In the canal we had stood the wishbone leaning against the mast so that it would not take up too much space (enough to worry about with a 50' mast on the deck of a 30' boat) and 30 locks to go through. Mast went up fine and then it was time to hoist the wishbone into position - it really couldn't be upside down could it? Spent a few minutes trying to figure out if it was possible to use it upside down (switch a few things around) but it was not to be. Lift the mast and flip the wishbone. At least there was no one around to ask us what we were doing.

A corollary to this - after getting rigged we took one of the club moorings across the river for the evening (the guest docks were full). Decided to go up the mast to fix something (can't remember what). While I was there two 35' (or so) power boats went roaring by - I saw them coming and had my arms and legs wrapped around the mast (no stays to hold onto or hold the masthead more or less in one place). At one point I was sure that I was going to be launched into the next county the 5" diameter top of the mast was whipping around so much.
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  #286  
Old 09-19-2009
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Since I am new to the Sailing part of being a sailor but spent a few years in the RCN and since Saberman posted a Destroyer story.....

I was an ABRP on the HMCS Terra Nova and sent down by my Chief to work on the refueling party. We were on A RIMPAC exercise off Hawaii and pulled up alongside a USN AOR (Oiler). I was the first guy closest to the rail pulling in on the light messenger when the heavy messenger came inboard, which is tied to the refueling probe, when the detentioning rig on the oiler jams. One minute I am holding on to the line standing on the deck the next second me and one other guy are hanging 25 feet above the water about 10 feet away from the side of the ship. Luckily they 2 other guys managed to maintain the lines grip on the capstan. As the ship started to sway together again they hauled like crazy to get us inboard and as we were hauled inboard over the railing I must admit my shorts were in need of a quick change. The only benefit to this evolution was the double tot of Navy Rum we got issued. Lesson learned ....if the line starts to run let figgen go.
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  #287  
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I just remembered one of my worst all time dumb moves. the excuse I guess was we were only 20 years old and extremely drunk. Now you have to understand that in the Canadian Navy it is a bit of a tradition when tied up along side to steal the other boats flags. they of course get returned after a suitable ransom is paid, usually alcoholic. We were in San Diego and had met some guys at the NRTC Junior ranks mess. They were Submariniers so we wound up at this Subies bar on base with a bunch of Nuke boats tied up nearby. After a few too many beers and our new friends in the head we decide that it would be a great Idea to sneak on to one of these nuke subs that were tied up and get their flags. Its about 19:30 so all of them are still up but its winter and the light is a bit dim. We shinny on the Head rope being quiet as all hell, amazing we could do that as walking was abit of a challange at the time. Sneak aft and climb up the sail. We can see the quartemaster at the aft end of the sail and we manage to get the commisioning penant, admirals flag ( turns out the boat was the flag at the time) and grab a couple of signal flags that are in the conning tower. Back on deck still unnoticed and back across the head rope.

Back in the bar with our loot we meet up with our new buddies only to be told that the USN is a real navy and they dont take kindly to intruders on Nuc subs. They explain that sentries are armed and will friggen shoot. We decide that it may not be wise to return the flags and slink back to our DDE with our loot and a life lesson. I wound up with the commissioning pennant and I must say when my house burned down 5 years later post navy the one thing I regreted loosing most was that pennant.
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  #288  
Old 09-21-2009
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No real worries

Hey Kootenay. I don't think you were ever in real danger from a submariner with a pistol. I was on a sub tender and a drydock taking care of submariners for 4 years and I don't think they were even issued ammo with the side arm. I'm sure if they did have ammo it wasn't in the pistol. If they got it loaded, they wouldn't have hit anything. We're talking Navy not Marines.

You were more in danger of falling down a hatch in your condition and hitting every rung on the ladder on the way down.
Mike
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  #289  
Old 09-21-2009
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Just yesterday

My most embarrasing so far was just yesterday. There were plenty of pleasure craft fishing and crabbing on Yaquina Bay yesterday and there was a beginning sailing class nearby. The incoming tidal current was as strong as any I've seen on the bay this season and the wind was light and variable. I was basically sailing in place just going side to side against the current and making a little headway.

Well I passed a navigation bouy and thought I had plenty of clearance before I tacked across in front of it. I was so sure I had plenty of clearance that I didn't even look back. Then suddenly the bouy was coming at me fast and I was about to be hit hard directly abeam. I quickly tacked the other way and managed only a glancing blow across the stern to my OB motor and swim ladder. I took some paint off the bouy and bent the ladder platform a little.

I decided to motor down bay and find some more wind so that wouldn't happen again. I was too busy to look, but I'm sure none of the pleasure boats or sailing students missed it.
Mike
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  #290  
Old 09-21-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MtHopeBay View Post
I was so sure I had plenty of clearance that I didn't even look back. Then suddenly the bouy was coming at me fast and I was about to be hit hard directly abeam.
I haven't hit anything lately but I've experienced the same thing with light wind and strong current. It is amazing how fast the distance closes.
I have a theory that their is some acceleration going on to. It seems as though the boat starts to loose control to the current then the wind catches the topsides and they combine to sweep the boat into what you don't want to hit at a faster and faster rate.
At least that is what it looks like.
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