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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #321  
Old 06-12-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by futureshock999 View Post
Real white knuckle time...we slow considerably, but pick up speed off the back of it..then WHAM, the second wave, larger than the first, stops us dead.

And then I see the third one coming at us, knowing I have no helm control to even point the bow to it, and we capsize...
Great Story
Let's see.
1. Pregnant fiancée of three months.
2. Three big waves too close together.

Timing is everything.

Last edited by davidpm; 06-12-2010 at 10:05 PM.
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  #322  
Old 06-13-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
Great Story
Let's see.
1. Pregnant fiancée of three months.
2. Three big waves too close together.

Timing is everything.
Let me guess...............triplets?
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  #323  
Old 07-02-2010
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Just started sailing this spring when I picked up an '87 MC Scow, and saw a '75 Butterfly for $200 with trailer that was hard to resist. I took the Butterfly out for her maiden voyage in ~5mph wind with a few blows here and there and she handled like a champ (mast raked aft a bit in retrospect). It seemed like a fun little one person scow and was very responsive, so I jumped at the chance to take her out again.

When I saw the wind was in the 10-20 mph range a weekend or so later, I thought it would be a fine time to take the boat out and really get it planing. Due to my previous "sense" of confidence, I learned the following lessons that day ...

1. Make sure the main sheet is not not twisted on multiple blocks before you head off into the wind. I was still using the originals, and they _definitely_ do not swivel. The first big puff hit me, and I could barely let it out before I flipped because it was twisted so bad. At that point, I realized that I couldn't even let the sheet out far enough without letting go to keep from going over entirely. Now the boom is perpendicular to the boat with the sheet knot stuck in the block ~ 6' away from where I can reach. Not wanting to disconnect all 3 blocks on the main sheet in the middle of a lake while it's blowing, I manage a 30 minute excruciatingly slow reach across the lake into the weeds on the other side.

2. Main sheet is untwisted and the blocks are reattached. I head back out across the weeds, and scare the crap out of a fishing boat when I pass within 20' or so out of control because I haven't realized that the weeds popped the tiller back up.

3. Sheet is fixed, tiller is back in the water, but the boat is still handling like crap compared to before. I blame it on the wind and head back to shore after fooling around for a bit. Once I drop the main, and pull the dagger board up, I realize I've had it in backwards the entire time.

Ah ... the joys of sailing and learning what _not_ to do
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  #324  
Old 07-04-2010
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Just after getting back into sailing after 30 years getting out to the lake 45 plus miles away every weekend were the boat stayed stored on the hard during the week. I felt like a 5 yr old at Christmas. Around the 5th Friday I just couldn't wait any more and headed out to the lake just after lunch time. Had my sail bag, (clothes and food) in the truck so off I went. Get to the lake, hook up the boat and get it launched and tied to the dock. park the truck and jump aboard to install the sails likke I have done the 4 times prior with one problem....NO SAILS... I took them home from the last outting to clean them and forgot to grab them from the spare bedroom.
So standing on deck with alot of powerboaters there launching at the ramp feeling a little dumb, wondering if I should just put the boat back on the trailer and put it back in the corral or make the 2 hour drive round trip to get the sails.

I'm sure my face was much redder then my hair as I walked up to the marina office to explain that I was going need to leave my boat tied to the back side of the launch dock to get my sails. It didn't help much that the office person yelled out the window to the Dock master that my boat would be there a few hours because I forgot my sails.

Stayed out all weekend and put a semi permanent sign on my dash that says "got sails?"
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  #325  
Old 07-23-2010
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I try not to post unless I can contribute something that hasn't been discussed - but given this topic, I have something to contribute given the "Bonehead" subject.

After a lovely passage to Bermuda with Dan Goldberg's BCR this June, I headed back to New England, leaving St. George with a lovely little breeze from the SW. The boat looked sharp, having been scrubbed and polished - everything in harbor shape - as we left. At NE Rocks, my son went forward with another crew and raised the asymmetrical spinnaker in its sock. As the sock went up, a visual check showed that the forward end of the leeward sheet was mis-lead under the lifelines, having not been reworked from it's harbor coil. Down came the sock and the line was refastened and lead properly. Up went the sock, and as I looked at the head of the mast, I saw that the halyard had been lead inside the headstay. Down came the sock and the halyard was refastened and lead properly. Up went the sock and the sail filled nicely and as one of my new crew began to trim the sheet, I looked from the wheel to the winch and saw that the sheet at this end TOO, was lead improperly and was chafing against the aftermost life lines.

Here is the bonehead part. (I mean the real bonehead part.) Rather than dropping the sock again and taking the air out of the 2,000 sq foot sail, I grabbed the synthetic sheet in my hand and taking a firm grip told the crew to get the line off the winch and re-lead it while I held the sheet.

Right.

A loaded 2,000 sq foot spinnaker is not like dinghy sailing. The line ripped through my right hand, burning across fingers, palm and side as I stupidly tried to hold it. Once we got the sail and sheet tamed, I coated the hand with cortisone cream for an hour and then kept it soaking in a pail of salt water for the next two days.

Lessons for the boneheaded. 1/don't hold a loaded sheet. 2/don't be lazy - drop your sails and get the wind out of them. 3/make sure that the crew really DID do the visual check to make sure all lines/halyards are lead properly. Good news for the boneheaded. At least I have always remembered (even when boneheaded) not to wrap a line around my hand. I probably would have lost some of it.

Painful. Literally and figuratively.

Live and learn.
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  #326  
Old 07-23-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmalkin View Post
I try not to post unless I can contribute something that hasn't been discussed - but given this topic, I have something to contribute given the "Bonehead" subject.

After a lovely passage to Bermuda with Dan Goldberg's BCR this June, I headed back to New England, leaving St. George with a lovely little breeze from the SW. The boat looked sharp, having been scrubbed and polished - everything in harbor shape - as we left. At NE Rocks, my son went forward with another crew and raised the asymmetrical spinnaker in its sock. As the sock went up, a visual check showed that the forward end of the leeward sheet was mis-lead under the lifelines, having not been reworked from it's harbor coil. Down came the sock and the line was refastened and lead properly. Up went the sock, and as I looked at the head of the mast, I saw that the halyard had been lead inside the headstay. Down came the sock and the halyard was refastened and lead properly. Up went the sock and the sail filled nicely and as one of my new crew began to trim the sheet, I looked from the wheel to the winch and saw that the sheet at this end TOO, was lead improperly and was chafing against the aftermost life lines.

Here is the bonehead part. (I mean the real bonehead part.) Rather than dropping the sock again and taking the air out of the 2,000 sq foot sail, I grabbed the synthetic sheet in my hand and taking a firm grip told the crew to get the line off the winch and re-lead it while I held the sheet.

Right.

A loaded 2,000 sq foot spinnaker is not like dinghy sailing. The line ripped through my right hand, burning across fingers, palm and side as I stupidly tried to hold it. Once we got the sail and sheet tamed, I coated the hand with cortisone cream for an hour and then kept it soaking in a pail of salt water for the next two days.

Lessons for the boneheaded. 1/don't hold a loaded sheet. 2/don't be lazy - drop your sails and get the wind out of them. 3/make sure that the crew really DID do the visual check to make sure all lines/halyards are lead properly. Good news for the boneheaded. At least I have always remembered (even when boneheaded) not to wrap a line around my hand. I probably would have lost some of it.

Painful. Literally and figuratively.

Live and learn.
Jim,

Great story! The machinations on the foredeck while hoisting the sock sound oddly familiar to me.

Sorry about that hand, though. Ouch! Next time, jibe maybe?

Always good to hear from you! - John
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  #327  
Old 08-16-2010
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On our current boat, on the night we went to move it, I fired up the engine and backed out of the slip. Funny enough, forward didn't work, and I realized it wasn't in gear. So we just sat there in the dark drifting towards the other boats when a nice gentleman in a dinghy swung by, pushed us safe, hopped on, put it in gear, said good bye, and zoomed away. We gave him a couple bottles of wine the next day.
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  #328  
Old 08-16-2010
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Running out of diesel/sucking air (twice) or wrapping the jib sheet on the prop (twice).
Or was it not double checking the shift cable installation.

So many choices.
Still, only two occured as captain, for the others i was just deck monkey.
Will elaborate after futzing with the car while we have daylight.

This BTW is a goldmine thread.
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  #329  
Old 08-18-2010
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So far mine was forgetting which way the wind was going and having a crash jibe on my O'Day 22.
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  #330  
Old 08-21-2010
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New One From Me - A Family Affair

Hi all, I just returned from a trip to Santa Cruz Island with my wife and two sons. We had a great time on our fairly-new-to-us Catalina 36. Which leads me to why I am posting.

First, I left the marina in heavy fog, less than 1/2 mile visibility, while the family slept. Radar and GPS got us to within 1/2 mile of the island before we could even see it. Froze my #ss off on this leg, but made it safely.

As I explained the different systems on the boat, water, thru-hulls, head, etc., the family started to get the hang of it. My wife mentioned that the water pressure pump was not working, even though we had three full tanks and the switch was on. Hmmmm, sound of runniing water in the head. Opened the door to find the shower/faucet on full blast and everything absolutely soaked. One tank down, and we have been anchored for about 1/2 hour.

After diligently explaining the process of turning on the propane and the solenoid valve to use the stove, and then turning both off after use, I broke my own rule. I left the propane on (in an approved locker) and just used the solenoid valve to shut it off. While climbing up the ladder on the transom I smelled gas. So, one water tank empty and now the propane tank is empty. Only a day and a half left in the trip. I took the spare tank off because it was extra clutter. Doh! We managed, but getting my coffee to perk using the BBQ took well over 1 hour due to wind.

Next, trying to get my stern anchor up was impossible. I used my dinghy from all different angles just like everybody else out there, but no luck. Finally, I brought the stern line to the bow and raised my bow anchor first. This sounds like a great idea, and it did work, but there were boats nearby and a brisk crosswind. In the midst of scurrying back and forth trying to get everything done, I kicked something on deck (no shoes) with only my little toe. Well, a useless appendage was made much more so by injury. But I wasn't done. Within about 5 minutes the same toe connected with something else solid.

Okay, both anchors are up and we are heading out into 20-25 knot cross wind. Sounds great right? Well, due to my being flustered over the anchoring debacle and my now rapidly discoloring foot, I was well out of the anchorage and into the sea before I tried to raise the mainsail. Although doable with an experienced and able crew, no so much with my wife and kids. Turned into the wind once to give it a go and started getting beat up so badly we fell of and went with the iron genny and the real genny only.

We made it back in good shape, and in retrospect, I learned more lessons to add to my limited sailing catalog. Biggest one? Wear your F##%ing boat shoes while doing important tasks. One less thing to worry about. Also, check that all faucets are closed before turning on water switch. Another is to check the connection (less than hand tight) on your propane cylinder and turn it off after every use. Oh yeah, bring the spare if you have the room (I do).

I hope I gave you all some chuckles and reminders of basic rules to follow. It was a great trip and the family hardly noticed the water and gas shortages. Now if I could just get my foot to fit in a shoe...

Cheers, Bill
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Last edited by montenido; 08-21-2010 at 12:15 PM. Reason: spelling
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