What's your biggest bonehead move sailing? - Page 34 - SailNet Community

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  #331  
Old 08-21-2010
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
I'd point out that toes, fingers and heads were the most commonly injured body parts as reported in a Safety at Sea seminar I attended a few years ago. Wearing shoes is REQUIRED on my boat if we're actively sailing. Broken toes are real PITA when you're not near medical help.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #332  
Old 08-22-2010
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flatchpa is on a distinguished road
Cool more bonehead chuckles

Channel Islands marina, early spring with moderate breeze in the morning coming out of the southwest. Earlier in the day was doing maintenance and found the fuel shut off valve on the diesel tank stuck...a little lubricant and turning it on-off, on-off a few times remedied the issue. Left the dock under power but just as I get to the end of the finger of slips the engine sputters a few times then no engine, so I use the momentum to clear the finger and get out to the channel...time to drop the anchor before drifting into some expensive fiberglass down wind...oh #$%&, anchor locker locked with padlock and no time to find the key...lets get the main up...hurry...hurry...I'm drifting, and oh yeah I'm single handling the Hunter 37 legend...forgot one sail tie #$%&, Main goes up and I narrowly escape expensive fiberglass tied up at the dock downwind from me. Tack a few times to an empty slip, sit down, swear to myself for not having the anchor unlocked and ready, find the valve, swear a bit more at my oldtimers disease. Now on the list of pre-flight is UNLOCK the anchor locker.
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  #333  
Old 08-22-2010
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second biggest bonehead move was failing to reef the main in 35 kn winds and ripping out the sail. 1st biggest bonehead move was doing the same thing a second time ten years later.
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  #334  
Old 08-23-2010
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Hi,My biggest goof was in Cowes yacht haven-the first one to starboard as you enter.They have long finger pontoons for alongside mooring.Saturday our boat was first in and so was at the end of a slot with a pontoon at right angles to the bow.The helm made a good aproach and the crew made all fast with the warps.Sunday,time to go the warps were slipped at my instruction.The helm selected astern and increased rpm,at my instuction.The boat went nowhere.More throttle,still no movement.Sunday morning in Cowes is very busy and by now everyone is looking at this boat at high revs going nowhere.I asked the helm to shut down and select neutral while I checked the prop for fouling -all ok.It was at this point someone from a nearby boat pointed out a bow line still attatched on the port side! A crew member had seen twin bow lines on another boat and had put one on without letting me know! If you are going to f**** up do it at the mecca of yachting in front of a very knowledgable audience.
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  #335  
Old 09-09-2010
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Well, I've only skippered a vessel once (my '74 Javelin), but I've already got a boneheaded move under my belt. It's a one-two punch.

1) I assumed that the previous owner had a clue when rigging the mainsheet. I was trying to sheet the main through one block on the centerboard trunk, shackled to the middle of the boom. 1:1 mainsheet purchase, even on a 14-foot boat, is no happy job. The fact that the cleat on the centerboard trunk was totally rounded off made things worse, as I had no way to keep her sheeted and rest my quickly-tiring hand/arm.

2) Since my arms and hands were getting tired, I decided to turn her up into the wind, sheet her in hard, and cleat it off (I can already hear you yelling at me ). I figured, "If I get a puff, I'll round up into the wind, and we'll do fine."

I made a couple of tacks, and we seemed to be doing well. It was about then I got the bright idea to give the jib a shot, so I hoisted it up, tacked, and sheeted it in too. I turned too far off the wind, and we got a puff, and no amount of rowing on the tiller was gonna point us back up. We started heeling madly, I stood on the trunk, leaning over the rail, and my girlfriend got drenched with entirely too much of the Cooper River, which was now flowing into the cockpit.

"Uncleat the main!" I yelled.
"What does that mean?", she yelled back.
"That! Take off that rope!"

She uncleated the mainsheet, I the jib, and we leveled off, sails flapping madly. I bailed for about 10 minutes with her water bottle, and we decided that was enough excitement for the day, we ran downwind, back to the boat ramp, and called it a night.

So, a little less luck, and a little more experience. Here's hoping the experience fills up before I run out of the luck
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  #336  
Old 09-09-2010
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Might want to read about John Vigor's Black Box theory.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 5hortBu5 View Post
Well, I've only skippered a vessel once (my '74 Javelin), but I've already got a boneheaded move under my belt. It's a one-two punch.

1) I assumed that the previous owner had a clue when rigging the mainsheet. I was trying to sheet the main through one block on the centerboard trunk, shackled to the middle of the boom. 1:1 mainsheet purchase, even on a 14-foot boat, is no happy job. The fact that the cleat on the centerboard trunk was totally rounded off made things worse, as I had no way to keep her sheeted and rest my quickly-tiring hand/arm.

2) Since my arms and hands were getting tired, I decided to turn her up into the wind, sheet her in hard, and cleat it off (I can already hear you yelling at me ). I figured, "If I get a puff, I'll round up into the wind, and we'll do fine."

I made a couple of tacks, and we seemed to be doing well. It was about then I got the bright idea to give the jib a shot, so I hoisted it up, tacked, and sheeted it in too. I turned too far off the wind, and we got a puff, and no amount of rowing on the tiller was gonna point us back up. We started heeling madly, I stood on the trunk, leaning over the rail, and my girlfriend got drenched with entirely too much of the Cooper River, which was now flowing into the cockpit.

"Uncleat the main!" I yelled.
"What does that mean?", she yelled back.
"That! Take off that rope!"

She uncleated the mainsheet, I the jib, and we leveled off, sails flapping madly. I bailed for about 10 minutes with her water bottle, and we decided that was enough excitement for the day, we ran downwind, back to the boat ramp, and called it a night.

So, a little less luck, and a little more experience. Here's hoping the experience fills up before I run out of the luck
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New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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  #337  
Old 09-09-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Might want to read about John Vigor's Black Box theory.
*googles*

Yup. Sounds very similar to the sentiment I paraphrased. If I didn't read it on Sailnet, I don't know where I got it, but it basically goes "A rookie sailor starts off with a full cup of luck and an empty cup of experience. You just have to hope that the experience fills up before the luck runs out."
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  #338  
Old 09-09-2010
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I was given a Bayliner 16 for trade for an engine build and gave it to my brother-in-law. so him and his wife to be with that boat and me and the 1st mate on our C-22 went out to the lake to check it out. The brother -in laws wife to be needed to use our porta head while we were tring to get back to the docks before a storm was rolled in, while she was utilizing the not fastened down pot a gust of wind caught us and heeded the boat over till we were washing the port windows. she talked like a vintage sailor if you ever heard one. she seems to walk away anytime we talk about sailing.
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  #339  
Old 09-10-2010
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Well, I've only been sailing...and racing since this spring. Last night was our last race of the season. Skippering in 15+ winds it was blowing nicely. This was race #2 of 2 and I had come in last place on the previous race. I won the start on the first race with a ballsy start on a port tack. Shortly across the line, the boats with rights were slightly ahead and I had to dip causing me to loose my lead. I would not let that happen again!!!

At the start of the second race, we timed it perfectly. Over the line with 1 second to spare, on a port tack and clearly ahead of all the other racers. As I left them in my wake, they had all fouled their air and were dead in the water. We steamed for the windward mark with speed and great Velocity Made Good. As we approached the windward mark, none of us could remember which way to round the mark. (The previous rounding was to starboard which is not conventional) We had enough room to round the mark in either direction and decided to round it to starboard again. As we rounded the mark, we picked up speed on the downward leg and saw the fleet approaching.

With rights over the fleet, speed and all the room in the world, I decided to plow right through the middle of them in an effort to throw them off of their line. I was happy. About to unseat the best racers in the club. A newbie on top and blowing away the experts. As the fleet passed us, the skipper of the first boat yelled "Round to port! Round to port!" DOH! Was he screwing with me? Making me take a needless re-round in an effort to slow me down? That is what I would have done. As the rest of the boats passed us laughing and yelling, "port, port," I realized I was done. A swift re-round was not enough to recover the lead. We ended up in 3rd. I guess I have learned my lesson.
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  #340  
Old 09-14-2010
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Running aground in front of a nudist beach
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