What's your biggest bonehead move sailing? - Page 41 - SailNet Community

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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #401  
Old 05-11-2011
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Oh, and...

How many times have we all routed the jib sheets on the inside of the shrouds???
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  #402  
Old 05-11-2011
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Of the boats I've sailed the Merit 25 was the most tender. They have a pretty high sail area to displacement ratio. Anything above 12 knots I start to think about reefing.

I don't understand why you couldn't just have let go of the tiller? Then it would have rounded up. Once rounded up, you could have heaved to while you reefed the main!
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  #403  
Old 05-11-2011
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Okay, I have gotten to page 11, and I feel a little better, a little wiser, and a little less agnostic.... there seems to be a little bit of intervention going on. But then sometimes I know there isn't (stories we'll never read) so I am back to where I started. Thanks to all, especially Charlie for starting the thread, Sabreman for copious contributions.

I will add my bonehead sequel now. The "move" was not making a thorough inspection of the 9.9 after the afore-reported close encounters of the bridge kind, perhaps submitting to a professional. Circumstance made that inconvenient at best and, hey, the motor, er... engine, worked.

The plan was to sail north from Jones Inlet, LI to New Bedford in 5 days including overnight sailing. We started on a reliable sea breeze, made Fire Island inlet buoy by dusk, switched to tacking into a NNE breeze, revisiting the FIE buoy a couple times. The decision by the captain to douse the sails and motor is approved by the crew. We motor through the night, clear skies, shooting stars, a little queasy as the seas are from the SE and when I don't control the yaw with the tiller one feels not so good...

6pm presents the option of Shinnecock Inlet for good night's rest. We enter, refuel, anchor an sleep, ready to leave at 6 a.m. planning to motor against a 15kn NE breeze and refuel at Montauk if necessary or simply sail north to Block Is. Exiting the inlet is a Galloping Gertie but we can see the waves and they ease up once in deeper water, we settle in.

Suddenly, it is curious how they do this very quickly without fanfare, it is very quiet, well, we can now hear the wind in the rigging, the white caps and the shore surf crashing. The Captain orders the sails raised, main with storm jib, and assigns his faithful son to take the helm.

I gather me tools, milady braces herself at the fuel well, tools in sweatshirt pouch, I incorporate myself into the stern rail, raise the engine, and proceed to investigate the situation.

Suddenly the jib sheet is flapping , the block having broken loose from its track mount. I return the tools, get out my well organized tray box of bits and install a screw and lock nut to resecure the block. While I am doing this the block that runs on the mainsheet track breaks through the track and is now teathered by the little skinny keeper lines stuck in the little cleats byt e little knots in the ends of the line. With jib sheet re-secured, I rig a secondary traveller line with shackle and secure the main sheet block to that and regain control.

Returning to the engine, I discover the cracked spark plug, but am frustrated that replacing the plugs draws no response from the engine... not even a thank you. I check for spark and get nothing, so I proceed to change the power pack (had two spares), but could not get adequate access to the lower bolt what with the pitching and rolling and not quite the right combination of tooling to do it effectively.

We turned back to Shinnecock Inlet and sailed her right back to the anchorage of the night before (down wind of the fishing vessels). My son crashed in the V Berth, milady got a book to read, ready to assist, and I spent three hours slowly backing out that bolt, replaced the power pack, the spark plug boots (learned how to make them up from the kit) and after three hours of careful methodical, not dropping anything into the bay, the engine started. After that it would not start hot, so refueling became nightmarish. Refilling a near empty tank was fine, but topping off left us unable to move off in tight quarters.

That night (11pm) we motored out at slack water, made Lake Montauk with a couple gals left, and then headed slowly to Block Island.

Our last day was classic, we caught the fair current all the way into New Bedford Harbor, under sail until we approached the hurricane barrier.

Now, with the right OE spark plugs and OE (as well as used) power pack, she starts up at our command and not only when it suits her.

We are looking forward to a less boneheaded season.... but I am afraid that may require a visit to the guillotine.

Irishskipper - I was thinking about just that sort of sounding method as I loaded my batteries on board.

ChucklesR - So that's why there's two boat hooks on the boat... my Dad was pretty smart.
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  #404  
Old 05-11-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkSF View Post
Of the boats I've sailed the Merit 25 was the most tender. They have a pretty high sail area to displacement ratio. Anything above 12 knots I start to think about reefing.

I don't understand why you couldn't just have let go of the tiller? Then it would have rounded up. Once rounded up, you could have heaved to while you reefed the main!
Exactly! And thus the "Bonehead" move!
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  #405  
Old 05-12-2011
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Sabreman,

I am sorry, you are not the only one who can flip a boat in a dead calm. I can do it too, and without the advantage of the open seas or river. At the Community Boating pavilion in Boston milady was going through the drill lessons the first time, there was no wind and I was preparing to rig one of those aforementioned Mercurys at the dock and demonstrate that I could (recertification process). They are sandwiched in like sardines tied so they don't rub, but that's about it. Rudders, sails and centerboards are stored in the shed so I had these items with me. I stepped on the boat, over she went, and I had a refreshing swim with centerboard, rudder and sail went in too; just love that muddy water.
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  #406  
Old 05-17-2011
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I've never routed the jib sheets inside the shrouds, but last year on my season-opening sail I forgot to attach the sheets to the jib.

Motored out of the creek, turned into the wind and raised the main, then hoisted the jib... and watched it blow freely in the moderate Spring wind, unhindered by attachments such as a jib sheet.

Sigh.

Turn back into the wind and get the jib aboard again, then attach the sheets. The rest of the day was uneventful.
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  #407  
Old 05-18-2011
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Smile

Oh well..... Me and a friend took my Hobie Wave into Moriches Bay (Long Island, NY, South Shore) and decided to try, for the first time, to shoot the Moriches Inlet and go for an Ocean sail.

The inlet is about 200 yds. wide with a 3 knot, plus or minus, current and a lot of chop. There is also a lot of boat traffic, of all sizes, usually moving at a good clip.

We head into the mouth of the channel on a light wind from the Northwest. I say to my friend, "We're doing great!" He points up at the sail which I see is beginning to loose the wind. I fight the panic of realizing that the current is pushing me through the channel, not the wind. I have no rudder control, but am still straight in the channel.

Before things got worse, I quickly lowered the sail while my friend hailed a passing powerboat for assistance. We tossed him a line and suffered the humbling experience of being towed behind three Yamaha 250's back into the Bay.

That was not the end. In the Bay, the wind began to slack and we were then being pushed slowly back toward the channel. We took the remaining wind and beached on an emerging shoal. We then had to suffer the further humbling of calling my wife to come get us with the Yamaha Waverunner, resulting in my second tow of the day.

A few weeks later, my, and my boats, ego were somewhat restored when the Waverunner needed to be towed for repair and the proud little Hobie Wave came to the rescue.
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  #408  
Old 05-27-2011
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replacing the furler line while the jib was furled. go for a nightsail, unfurl the jib and oops.. had to undo the line and tie it off more than half way up the starboard side.. next day go to the marina, same type of line, same length, same guy who sold it to me the day before, same stupid look he gives me when he knew i botched something up ...
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  #409  
Old 05-28-2011
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Got my MOB drill done for the season, yesterday.

Took a lady friend (from my Frostbite crew) sailing. Before we left, I routed the spinnaker sheets and attached the spin bag to the foredeck in anticipation of a nice run back hom.

An outgoing tide against the 15kt breeze from the south made for a steep chop, really tossing the boat around. The breeze was also still building. I opted not to fly the spinnaker but decided that there was no harm in leaving it securely tied to the stanchions.

Yeah, the bag was tied but the sail inside wasn't tacked or sheeted. The vacuum in the slot between the main and genoa basically sucked the spinnaker out of it's bag and dumped it overboard. We were chatting casually when I noticed a brightly colored ball of fabric go streaking by... and I uttered a stream of profanity learned from 20 years of Navy service.

I was a little over canvassed by now, and couldn't gybe around, so I tacked around. My partner couldn't reach the chute, so she went below for the gaff while I kept circling, watching my chute spread out and slowly sink.

At last, she came up with the gaff in hand. I told her this would probably be our last chance. She snagged the spinnaker and I immediately abandoned the tiller and grabbed it with my hands so that the gaff wouldn't tear a hole in it.

We hauled it back aboard, laughing. Only then did I realize that we'd done a MOB drill. I wasn't happy about shrimping my spinnaker, but I was happy that we'd kept our eye on it and recovered it as we would have a person. The breeze and waves made it less than easy.

All I could think of was "Where am I going to get another $800 on such short notice if I lose the 'chute??"
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  #410  
Old 05-28-2011
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Nice recovery! If I fall of your boat please don't use a gaff on me.
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