What do YOU do in a squall? - Page 6 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
 Not a Member? 

Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #51  
Old 08-25-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Sailaway21-

I am perfectly aware that we're talking summer squall lines and not larger, longer duration heavy weather. I'm still not a fan of sea anchors. In either case, the shock loading caused by the sea anchors, if they're properly sized to stop the boat, is too high for the deck hardware on most boats to deal with most of the time. There's a huge difference between a sea anchor and a drogue.

Earlier this year, I help rebuild the deck on a C&C that had been damaged by the PO's use of a sea anchor. Now, if you beef up the deck hardpoints and design them to take the loads a sea anchor can exert... that's fine.. most boats don't have hardware that can.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #52  
Old 08-25-2007
hellosailor's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 10,893
Thanks: 2
Thanked 103 Times in 100 Posts
Rep Power: 10
hellosailor has a spectacular aura about hellosailor has a spectacular aura about
Alas, the Sampson Post, rarely to be found in a plastic production boat.

Probably worth adding a stanza to the Young Lass From Nantucket limerick, if there isn't something topical on that already. (Anyone?)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #53  
Old 09-14-2007
Lancer28's Avatar
I'm the FNG still...
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 397
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Lancer28 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaschrumpf View Post
Somebody posted before that they were "not a fan of sea anchors." If there is searoom enough, is there any reason not to employ a sea anchor? That always seemed to me to be a good solution to dealing with a sudden squall that one knows will not last long. Are there problems with it that of which I am unaware?

Thanks!
I understand that sea anchors are only to help you make your point to 45 degress into the wind when you heave-to and your boat won't completely stop forereaching or point properly.

Some boats point on a main, some point on both sails, some point only when helped with a 'chute.

The safety valve of heave-to is in the wake you leave on the weather side of the boat, if you are always going forward, you leave the wake and protected area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #54  
Old 09-26-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 139
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
maxcontax is on a distinguished road
safety first.

Yeah, piling on, but drop all the sails since you have no idea what sort of a squall you are hitting, power up, and adjust as seen fit: if you are head to wind try a bit of headsail to stiffen the boat, if you are running, same holds true, a bit of headsail to take the roll out of her. Squalls are dramatic but end. Go sailing afterwards but not during.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #55  
Old 09-26-2007
SVAuspicious's Avatar
Mermaid Hunter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: on the boat - Chesapeake
Posts: 3,673
Thanks: 0
Thanked 132 Times in 117 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SVAuspicious will become famous soon enough
I think a lot depends on how your boat handles. I carry a 100% jib on the furler. The boat doesn't point well without a headsail. My response is in order, since it is possible I won't get all the way through the list before a squall hits.

1. Quick run through boat to shove anything in the sink that may slide or break -- turn on nav lights before going back topside and bring up inflatable PFDs for all hands -- additional life jackets are in cockpit locker
2. Hatch boards in and slide closed
3. Come up into the wind and pinch a bit (gives me more room off lee shore and makes subsequent steps easier)
4. Reef main (I have three reefs, and when overpowered get a lot of weather helm -- the main is reduced first -- all halyards are at the mast)
5. Rig inner forestay
6. Get staysail on deck, hanked onto inner forestay, and sheets run
7. Double-check for lines over the side
8. Start engine, but leave in neutral
9. Rig jacklines on deck (tethers in cockpit locker)
10. Sail the boat

If it looks like it is going to be really ugly I'll roll up the jib and get the staysail up. My thresholds for some of this may change when I get a 135 genoa this Fall. The anchor is always ready to go and I have a windlass control in the cockpit -- anchoring is an option on the Chesapeake where I sail these days. The VHF is on when I am sailing; I have a remote VHF station at the helm and usually monitor 13, 16, and 68.

I can carry the full jib in a good amount of wind and it really helps the boat to point. I can run the furling line to a secondary winch and furl in pretty high wind.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #56  
Old 09-26-2007
chucklesR's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Pasadena Md - Magothy side
Posts: 5,979
Thanks: 10
Thanked 31 Times in 31 Posts
Rep Power: 10
chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough
Hit a +45 kt squall the first week on my new boat this spring -
Saw it coming with 10 minutes notice and Navy training kicked in, lights on, pfd's and foulies on, VHF on (no lighting, just wind and rain- and it's rarely on normally), hatches down and latched, doors shut - I don't tether if in the cockpit, it's big wide and deep. Cell phone and hand held VHF into a zippy (ditch bag). We were already bare poles, motor on, so we put the leeward centerboard 1/2 down (Gemini catamaran). Headed dead into the wind, and held the boat to 1kt, monkeying the throttle to keep it there. With the twin hulls funneling the air it's a choice or bow on, or bow off, and watching that you keep it there in wind shifts. Stayed dry, bounced a bit, but man we came out of it loving our new boat. On our previous Hunter 31 it would have required a change of underwear, and more than likely shredded the bimini

Main point is, take ALL of these inputs, have a plan, know the plan, Communicate the plan, and use the plan(including carrying fresh underwear if needed). Afterwards, review said plan and incorporate lessons learned.
Besides, the point isn't just getting thru this one, it's keeping it calm and relaxed enough to talk the crew into going out again.

Now opinion time:
I think sailing at all in a squall is bad mojo - a down burst can hit from any direction at any time. You can literally be hove to one minute and beam on the next second (followed by broached, then poached). You can't heave to on most boats adequately in the varying wind speeds of a squall - most boats require fine tuning the sail/rudder trim.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #57  
Old 09-26-2007
arbarnhart's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 761
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
arbarnhart is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by chucklesR View Post
Now opinion time:
I think sailing at all in a squall is bad mojo - a down burst can hit from any direction at any time. You can literally be hove to one minute and beam on the next second (followed by broached, then poached). You can't heave to on most boats adequately in the varying wind speeds of a squall - most boats require fine tuning the sail/rudder trim.
What do you think MTBF on boat motors is? Anything that makes it quit running is a failure, even running out of gas. I have not been able to find anything exact, but the wide range of estimates I found says 300 hours is good and 20 hours is poor. Others have pointed out that gas sloshing around in rough conditions can stir up sediment. My point is that having the engine quit on you is not an incredibly rare event.
__________________
-Andy
Newport 17 - "Kohanna"
At sea Darwin's hypotheses is the final arbiter of right of way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #58  
Old 09-26-2007
SVAuspicious's Avatar
Mermaid Hunter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: on the boat - Chesapeake
Posts: 3,673
Thanks: 0
Thanked 132 Times in 117 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SVAuspicious will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by chucklesR View Post
Now opinion time:
I think sailing at all in a squall is bad mojo - a down burst can hit from any direction at any time. You can literally be hove to one minute and beam on the next second (followed by broached, then poached). You can't heave to on most boats adequately in the varying wind speeds of a squall - most boats require fine tuning the sail/rudder trim.
You have every right to your opinion. I happen to disagree with you with respect to my boat. With three reefs in the main and a staysail up Auspicious is very controllable in high wind. Weather helm does build up, but even in 60 kts gusting higher she hasn't rounded up.

On the other hand, in my old Catalina Capri 22 I would certainly drop all sail and run for cover.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #59  
Old 09-26-2007
speciald's Avatar
Special Delivery
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: live on boat
Posts: 661
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
speciald is on a distinguished road
Send a message via Skype™ to speciald
The decrease in wind seen as you aproach a squall will usually equal the increase in wind speed you will experience as you enter an off- shore squall and give you an indication of how much wind to expect in the squall and what to do with sail area before you enter a squall. It really depends on your boat as to what to do before entering the squall. If you can tolerate 25-30 knots without reefing- go for it, otherwise reef before you enter the squall.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Speedboat missing in bad squall (Lynn News) NewsReader News Feeds 0 07-28-2006 05:16 AM
At sea. Volvo Ocean Race: Huge squall pushed movistar to 30 knots in the wrong direction @ BYM Sailing News NewsReader News Feeds 0 04-16-2006 03:15 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:51 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.