how much is too much wind - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 28 Old 08-23-2007
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sailortjk1's boat is actually the big flybridge powerboat on his avatar's starboard dock side. < G >

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post #12 of 28 Old 08-23-2007
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Full sail is usually comfortable in winds up to 15 kts with our ketch rig. But, our boat can be a bit tender and so is my wife in her ability to accept excessive heeling.

Therefore, when reaching in winds exceeding 15-20 kts, I often sail with just the mizzen and a reefed main for good balance.

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post #13 of 28 Old 08-23-2007
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It only LOOKS like a Hylas...he is trying to disguise it!! hahahahah!!
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post #14 of 28 Old 08-23-2007
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Not a Haylas.
It's a Bending Toy as they are reffered to around here.
I could not afford a Hylas so I got the next best thing.

Courtney is My Hero

If a man is to be obsessed by something, I suppose a boat is as good as anything, perhaps a bit better than most - E.B. White
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post #15 of 28 Old 08-23-2007
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The tenderness or stiffness of your boat is a big part of it. I have sailed on boats that seem to be overpowered over 20 knots (even with a reef) and on boats that love 30+. The one thing that I would say is, if in doubt, reef.
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post #16 of 28 Old 08-23-2007
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I got it
but the point is that certain boats can handle more wind than others because of materials of construction and design
This thread started with an Irwin 25.5 which is much different than a full keel ocean design ketch for instance and the righting moments of the responders are quite different
plus the answer lies also in the ratio of the main to headsail and what reduction combinations are available.
The best advice given was to reef early then shake it out until things appear to be stressed or the boat looses it footing
New sailors always feel like they are going faster when they are excessively heeled. There is a point where increase in the waterline is neglegible compared to the loss of exposure of the sails to the wind. This changes from boat to boat and relates to overhangs and deadrise, etc. and thus hull speed

and when your arm hurts from holding the tiller all day, you have sailed an unbalanced helm and essentially have been putting the brake on all day
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post #17 of 28 Old 08-23-2007 Thread Starter
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thanks for the information handled the 10 to 20 the other day not sure about the 25 not ashamed to reef myself just not sure what the boat was desinged to handle oh yes if i am nbot sailing alone i have my dad with me in that case hes got the tiller and i am the crew
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post #18 of 28 Old 08-23-2007
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Hi,

One point I would like to make is the sea conditions can have just as much of an effect on your sailing as the wind speed. Where are you sailing? A small lake will be a lot different than open water where bigger waves can develop. Also, which way are you going? If you are just out for day sail, then it doesn't matter but if you have a destination, beating upwind for a few hours will not be comfortable, while sailing downwind will be a lot easier.

I sail on the Long Island sound, on the south side. A 20 kt wind from the south is great because the water will be flat (the land prevents big waves from forming). Last night I went racing. The wind has been from the east at 15 kts for two days. The sound is very long to the east and 3-4 ft waves developed. Going upwind was 'interesting' The apparent wind was 20 kts, the boat was heeled 25 degrees (even with 5 people on the rail and the #2 headsail) and we pounded through the waves with a wet ride. When we reached the windward mark and and headed downwind, it was like a different world. The apparent wind dropped to about 10 knots, and the waves made it fun as we surfed down them.

If you haven't tried it, I suggest you put a reef in the main, roll up the headsail 20% or so (the max most roller reefing headsails can tolerate and still have any sort of shape), and go for it. Try to start on a beam reach. This will be fast and should not heel too much. If that
seems ok try beating upwind. After beating for some time turn and run downwind home and enjoy the ride!

I like fall sailing because there is usually a lot more wind. I take my 150 genoa down and put up my 100 jib.

Good luck,
Barry

Barry Lenoble
Deep Blue C, 2002 C&C 110
Mt. Sinai, NY

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post #19 of 28 Old 08-23-2007
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My Buccaneer 18 dinghy/daysailor can manage 12-15 kts solo, up to 25 with crew. I've been caught out with no warning in 35+ with crew; it wasn't pleasant, but we made it. Absolute windspeed isn't the only factor, IMO. A heavy but steady blow is easier to deal with than a gusty or shifty one.

Sail trim is important. Our blown-out old main really twists off the wind above 30 kts, and the damned creeping halyard can make the luff lose shape. I have to invite a certain amount of jib luff to keep the wind thru the gap from collapsing the main. (I furl the jib if I can get to it.) Finally, I have to accept less than ideal points of sail: I raise the centerboard a bit to lessen the heel, then either fall off to a beam reach with some sail luff (this boat seems to like that heading), or I pinch just to this side of flogging. Harder to do the latter when the winds are shifty.
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post #20 of 28 Old 08-23-2007
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I would say that if you just learning to sail (like me) or learning a new boat (like me), then reef earlier. That way you feel more comfortable, and can gain more appreciation for the boat, and what she can handle... and what you can handle. Once you get more feel for everything, you will be able to judge when to reef not by a number on a gauge, but by the way everything feels... which I think is the best way.

So, reef early, and learn the boat. Later, it will become a sense that controls when to reef.

-MysticGringo

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