Proper Line Cleating Method - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
 Not a Member? 

Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 09-05-2007
Sabreman's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Yeocomico River, VA
Posts: 1,604
Thanks: 2
Thanked 14 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Sabreman will become famous soon enough Sabreman will become famous soon enough
I agree with the statement that on large vessels, lines are warpped w/figure eights and never cleated. I spent a week on the schooner Heritage (Rockland, ME) and when I hitched one of the jib sheets, they gently instructed me as teo the proper way to cleat a line on their vessel. The same went for halyards.

Regarding smaller vessels, I believe that hitches (on horned cleats) are safer because the smaller line diameter doesn't exhibit the same friction as does the larget diameter line on a schooner; smaller diameter line will slip far easier and must be hitched. I don't know where the demarcation point is with respect to line diameter but we'll continue to use hitches on Victoria for halyards, dock lines, and similar.
__________________
Sabre 38 "Victoria"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 09-05-2007
punjabi's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 168
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
punjabi is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReverendMike View Post
For powerboats, which operate under different rules of course, there is a different method: wrap the line around the cleat under both horns at least three times, then make figure eights over the top until the cleat is no longer visible or you run out of line. Pile any remaining line loosely on top to help hold it in place.
So true.

By the way, if you want to be a real reverend, go to the following. I'm already a man of the cloth and it only took about 2 minutes...

http://www.themonastery.org/?destination=ordination
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 09-05-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 825
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
chris_gee is on a distinguished road
I suspect 1 wrap and a figure eight are enough to hold it, though people often do more because they can. Although the hitch shown is on the free end I have struggled long enough to untie a warp done by crew to never want a hitch on the end.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 09-05-2007
pirateofcapeann's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Gloucester, Mass. USA
Posts: 373
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 13
pirateofcapeann is on a distinguished road
Yea, that’s right. But you must remember that hitch was intended for natural fiber lines. Synthetic lines tend to be a bit more slippery and an extra hitch over the opposite horn of the cleat wouldn’t hurt any. Same goes when I’m splicing. 4 tucks was the rule in Manila line but I tuck 5 or 6 in Nylon.
__________________
________________________#\__
"Who would go to sea for pleasure
would go to hell for pastime."

PoCA
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 09-06-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,710
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SEMIJim will become famous soon enough SEMIJim will become famous soon enough
Hmph. Depends on the line and my goal. I've got the shore end of two of my dock warps, which lead to cleats, with one wrap, a couple figure-eights, and a couple hitches. Those are meant to stay put. For any line I expect to have to remove soon, and certainly won't be unattended: A wrap or half-wrap and two-to-three figure-eights. For cleated halyards: A wrap or half-wrap, a couple figure-eights and a single hitch. The same for sheets, except I may leave out the hitch, "depending."

N.B.: I yet to have a cleat hitch jam on me on a halyard or sheet. Not saying it cannot or will not happen--just saying it's never happened to me.

Jim
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 09-06-2007
danjarch's Avatar
Siren 17
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Grapevine TX
Posts: 1,899
Thanks: 1
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Rep Power: 8
danjarch will become famous soon enough
Remember, that bigger boats expect to be out for weeks at a time. You might be on the same tack for days. This lets hitches the probably would have been fine to tighten up. If your not going out that long then why would you need to make sure it can't slip., so why bother with a hitch. This is the traditional way of looking at it. Also, newer boats use the friction to ease off a line too, it just usually done by having two wraps on the self tailing winch. You pull the line out of the cam cleat and ease it over the winch drum. If you pull back, the friction of the winch drum allows you to hold an otherwise heavy load that would pull through your hands. I don't think that modern lines are as persnickety as the older ones, so I wouldn't worry to about the halyard, unless you just want to. Its nice to know extra tricks, just in-case.
__________________
!! WARNING !! The above information is to be used by intelligent people only. If you are Stupid, could be considered a moron, or otherwise. You are instructed to disregard this information and seek the help of a licensed and bonded professional.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 09-07-2007
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Azeotrope is on a distinguished road
The diagram and deficient directions for making off a line at a cleat in the referenced link are grossly incorrect. All lines are wrapped on cleats, Samson posts, bollards, bits, capstans, winches, wildcats, pilings, your mother-in-law’s neck etc. in a CLOCKWISE direction. There are good reasons for this: 1) It maintains the lay of twisted line. 2) In the dark the next guy knows how the line will come off. 3) It’s the custom of mariners worldwide.
It also neglects to tell you to wrap the line around the cleat AT LEAST one full wrap.

On well-rigged boats it will be clear to anyone who bothers to look that the cleats are angled when necessary (e.g. for winches) to accommodate a clockwise wrap. A walk down the dock with an eye on mooring lines will clearly revel who is an experienced hand and who isn’t. The wrap of their lines tells it all.

BTW the “square knot” directions are in error. Boy Scouts tie “square knots” sailors tie “reef” knots (not “reefing”….*reef* knots).
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 09-07-2007
trantor12020's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Singapore
Posts: 674
Thanks: 2
Thanked 10 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 9
trantor12020 is on a distinguished road
I don't like the Cleat Hitch shown as under load its could be difficult to remove. I would prefer making another 1/2 loop and cleat-off. That way its easier to remove. Also if the berthing is in choppy waters, we (as in Sg) tends to, after the cleat-off pile the rest of rope looping on the cleat. This create a soft spot for when the boat bounces and roll the rope would fend off the hull from metal cleats. Often the dock cleats are verticle i.s.o. sloping back thus could damage boat hull.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 09-07-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,710
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SEMIJim will become famous soon enough SEMIJim will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by Azeotrope View Post
The diagram and deficient directions for making off a line at a cleat in the referenced link are grossly incorrect. All lines are wrapped on cleats, Samson posts, bollards, bits, capstans, winches, wildcats, pilings, your mother-in-law’s neck etc. in a CLOCKWISE direction. There are good reasons for this: 1) It maintains the lay of twisted line. 2) In the dark the next guy knows how the line will come off. 3) It’s the custom of mariners worldwide.
Hmmm... I tend to bring the line around the side/end of the cleat opposite of where it's heading off to. That is to say, for example, the starboard bow warp "enters" the on-shore cleat on the left side of the cleat, as you're facing the bow of the boat from shore, and, thus, wraps around the cleat anti-clockwise. The port side warp does the opposite. Just always seemed to me that's the way it should be. I'll have to take this "always clockwise" rule under advisement.

Jim
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 09-07-2007
CapnHand's Avatar
humble pie rat
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 867
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
CapnHand is on a distinguished road
I see no mention here of the foot cleat or the butt cleat. Both are practiced on a regular basis by me and the crew.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Line Sight @ Proper Course NewsReader News Feeds 0 04-08-2006 03:15 PM
Getting Good Starts, Part Two Zack Leonard Racing Articles 0 01-15-2004 07:00 PM
Getting Good Starts, Part One Zack Leonard Racing Articles 0 12-18-2003 07:00 PM
Hold That Line Tom Wood Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 10-03-2002 08:00 PM
Using Winches Safely Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 08-18-2002 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:39 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.