Man Overboard - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
 Not a Member? 

Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 01-07-2008
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
I would highly recommend, if you've just lost the only crew you had on-board, hitting the MOB button on the GPS ASAP, just in case you lose sight of them.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 01-07-2008
Gryzio's Avatar
Spam, Food of the Seagods
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 212
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Gryzio is on a distinguished road
Red face Really depends on circumstances

This something I like to practice regular and it something to do on the boat for others besides sitting around.

I done various scenarios from using the boom pole to get a person on board the boat (One person to save).

To my falling off and having to get on board alone!
(This I practice with someone on the boat, but, they are not to intervene unless I call for help).

So, practice is best I know and different ways as mentioned; Figure 8, Engine Power etc.). But, in my opinion we need to practice and try various ways of doing it. On a calm day, maybe the Engine work great. But, in rough water with the boat raising up and slamming down in the water, maybe a boom pole to keep them from the boat more until they up. It a hard call to make until we in a particular situation. But, practicing other alternatives before we need them is best to be prepared for the situation.

I wanted to add; the MOB Button can help. Once my Niece's miniature Doberman fell overboard. I guess the waves were around 5 feet. I hit the button and went right to the dog. He was swimming his heart out. Scooped him up with a small crab/fish net on a pole I always keep handy.
__________________
All the rivers run into the sea, yet the sea is not full.
Ecclesiastes, 1:7
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by Gryzio; 01-07-2008 at 06:38 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 01-07-2008
soulesailor's Avatar
blue collar cruiser
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Casco Bay, Maine
Posts: 370
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
soulesailor is on a distinguished road
For me and my boat using the motor is extremely inconvenient. I have an outboard in the lazarette so to employ it I would have to:

Open the lazarette hatch
Un-wingnut the plug
Put the plug on the cockpit floor
Raise the motor out of the resting position and install in the hole
Tighten both turn screws
Get out the gas line from the cockpit locker
Hook up the motor to the gas tank
Prime the gas line
Start pulling the starter cord
Engage motor in gear and go after swimmer

Sailing back to the MOB really is the only option for me in most scenarios. I like the figure 8 method. I don't think I could just stop and let the wind push me back in a straight line, my bow always falls off the wind and I have no steerage unless I'm moving a little faster.
__________________

who is staring at the sea is already sailing a little
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 01-07-2008
Sasha_V's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 459
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
Sasha_V will become famous soon enough
Well, yeah, that does change things.


Sasha
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 01-07-2008
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
sasha-

I'm going to send you a big treble hook, that your wife can use during the time she's dragging you in the water... She might just catch a shark using you as bait.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 01-07-2008
speciald's Avatar
Special Delivery
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: live on boat
Posts: 661
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
speciald is on a distinguished road
Send a message via Skype™ to speciald
We were having a discussion in the marina one night years ago and the question came up as to what a wife would do if her husband fell from the boat. One woman gave a very detailed account of how she would start the engine and motor the boat home. We had to ask her -" What about your huband, Jim?" OOPS!!!!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 01-08-2008
tenuki's Avatar
Helms ALee!
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Pacific Northwest, USA
Posts: 1,245
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
tenuki will become famous soon enough
Good posts everyone, especially Sasha - I'm planning on taking my wife and son over to lake washington this summer and make them recover me from warm water. I'm pretty confident I can recover somebody else with my life sling and tackle and prefer the quick stop, but I'm worried about my own ass if I ever fall into the puget sound freezer.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
member
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 01-08-2008
Living & Cruising on Dana
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: on my boat
Posts: 574
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Robby Barlow is on a distinguished road
Sorry to say that I wouldn't want to be the MOB sailing with most of you guys on a 40'-50' yacht, in 35+ knot wind and a 12' swell. In these conditions you can't see the MOB in under 2 minutes even when you're looking straight at him.

Tenuki - before you jump overboard - let them practice with something else.
__________________
Your pleasure is my business !!!
________________________
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 01-08-2008
Owner, Green Bay Packers
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SW Michigan
Posts: 10,318
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice
I would emphasize a point that Sasha has made also. In a for real MOB situation the only thing that is essential is keeping an eye, preferably eyes, on the MOB. I favor the quick stop method, but each situationis different and the sailing conditions and boats do not lend themselves equally to set procedures. What must be a set procedure though is that everyone, absolutely everyone, keep their eyes on the MOB. If there is shiphandling or sail handling to be done it can be effective to pass off lookout duties to each other, but it must be absolutely a certainty that the relief lookout actually has the MOB in sight, and as soon as possible all crews eyes should be trained again on the MOB. Regardless of how you return the vessel to the MOB, hoist him on board, etc... it is all futile if you lose sight of him.

He may well freeze to death alongside the boat while you're trying to hoist him on board, but it is far surer that he'll do the same alone if you lose sight of him. I do not believe in anyone going below for lifesaving gear, blankets, lines, and the like. There will be time enough for that as you come back upon the MOB. That one person you send below may be the set of eyes that keeps the MOB in sight. Of course, this will be the time that your lookout gets smacked by the boom during a crash jibe as well, and if you're steering and your two other crew are making up lines, you've just lost sight of your MOB. It's very important that the person who sees the MOB make sure that the others on board do as well. The tendency is for people, when they hear, "I see him, I see Him", to assume that the lookout function is fulfilled. what they should really be saying is, "Where away?" Especially in weather there's going to be a degree of panic and mistakes made. The one man that sees the MOB suddenly will get his foot fouled in a line and look down losing you your lookout if other's are not spotting the MOB as well.

I prefer to send a bowline on a bight to the MOB, but it's surely preferable to send a simple bowline if that's what can be reliably tied by the person handling the line. Getting a bight around the MOB is going to go a long way towards calming the MOB and, I believe, is more important than passing a life jacket. Once he's secured to the line about his chest, or the bowline on a bight can have his legs slipped through, it's fine to pass a flotation device-you're not going to lose him now. There are so many ways to bring him back on board, and the boats and conditions so varied, that it's difficult to attempt to suggest one of broad applicability. It certainly is of great help should the water be not too frigid as the vessel can be brought under control and even manoeuvered to make landing the MOB easier. In those cases, more often than not, the MOB's strength will be the prime mover in getting him on board. If hypothermia is not an issue, and the MOB has been exerting himself, little is lost by allowing him to float, rest, and recover his strength. In a heavy boat, in a running sea, it may prove beneficial to move the MOB towards bow or stern. As the boat scends the MOB may find himself on a level with or above the lifelines and be able to grab ahold. This is a good time to have a crewmember get the medical kit out as well as a blanket and bandages. The likelyhood of injury during boarding is not slight, with head injury being the most likely.
__________________
“Scientists are people who build the Brooklyn Bridge and then buy it.”
Wm. F. Buckley, Jr.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 01-08-2008
Omatako's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Auckland New Zealand
Posts: 2,426
Thanks: 0
Thanked 28 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Omatako will become famous soon enough
It's interesting that (I think) all of the scenarios sketched above use the "running downwind" description. You could of course be beating hard and then it's a case of quickly heaving to and drifting back to the MOB .

As far as dropping the sails, I (partly) disagree with that for two reasons. First, when you get back to the MOB with at least the main still up, the boat can be heaved to and will be a lot more stable and second, in a hove-to attitude, the leeward rail will be deeper in the water (much less freeboard) as you drift onto the MOB.

Of course,the second advantage is not there for the multis because remember, they are always level .

Whenever we do these drills we immediately luff the boat, furl the headsail, sheet the main up hard and motor back to upwind of the MOB, heave to and drift back. For a practise MOB, a horseshoe life ring tied to a bucket to stop it drifting too fast.

Andre
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Search for man overboard in Long Island Sound - WTNH NewsReader News Feeds 0 03-28-2007 10:15 PM
RE: MAN OVERBOARD POLE MOUNT sailstactics Gear & Maintenance 2 08-05-2003 05:29 PM
Crew Overboard Sue & Larry Seamanship Articles 0 07-23-2002 08:00 PM
Overboard Emergencies John Kretschmer Seamanship Articles 0 11-16-2001 07:00 PM
Overboard Emergencies John Kretschmer Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 11-16-2001 07:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:18 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.