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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #81  
Old 01-11-2008
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sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice
Not having tried it, I can say no more. The results of a test wouldn't surprise me one way or the other.
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  #82  
Old 01-11-2008
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Sailaway-

I'd rather give the person something that will actually increase my chances of keeping them in sight, or help keep them afloat. A bunch of styrofoam plates really does neither. If you happen to have big blocks of orange styrofoam or a big styrofoam cooler... by all means heave it overboard to the COB... they'll probably help... I just don't see any point in polluting for absolutely no good reason. Recovering a floating styrofoam cooler is also a lot easier than recovering a dozen floating styrofoam plates.

BTW, you would still be in violation of MARPOL since MARPOL forbids the discarding of plastic anywhere... you might want to read up on it.


PS, I have a sneaking suspicion that OMFG is a troll that has been previously banned from sailnet.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Last edited by sailingdog; 01-11-2008 at 09:51 AM.
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  #83  
Old 01-14-2008
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hmsbluechip is an unknown quantity at this point
Styrofoam plates

Well I certainly found a couple people that I would never want to crew with. More worried about violating a law rather than saving a crew member.
Let’s see, twenty Styrofoam plates weight about an ounce or two, they are made from hydrocarbon so that means I’ve dumped about 2 ounces of crude oil into the water. Contrary to unlearned opinion, Styrofoam does not last forever. It actually breaks down into smaller and smaller particles when exposed to UV rays, in a short period of time those plates will have disappeared. Can a body of water handle millions of tons of Styrofoam repeatedly? No. Can it handle a couple of ounces that might have helped to save a life – I believe so. I wouldn’t hesitate to dump the whole Exxon Valdez if I thought it would save a life.
I really think that the people - that off the bat dismissed my suggestion have probably never been off shore to see how big the ocean is. There is nothing out there but miles and miles of nothing. I heard another person say that if you drop a basketball in the water in 6 foot seas, in 15 seconds you can’t see the ball any more. I believe that. While I’m not a huge blue water sailor, I have made several crossings of six hundred miles or more. Many times I’ve seen some float sum going by and by the time I could point it out to a fellow crew member it was gone.
The person I referred to in my original note that gave me the idea of marking a MOB with Styrofoam plates does have a bit of sailing under his belt, he’s an Ausie and he has sailed in the Hobart race among others, he’s also a solicitor, so I wonder how much he’d laugh to hear that the legality of tossing a few plates in the water out weights the possibility of saving a life. And that’s what this tread was about. Mallory (the guy from Sailnet that started the thread) wanted to get some discussion about this very serious subject and many people had good ideas. It’s something that we don’t think about enough, but when it happens you better be acting out of instinct. That person in the water might only have a few minutes if it’s cold and if you have to go read up on what to do, then it’s too late.
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  #84  
Old 01-14-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
a big styrofoam cooler... Recovering a floating styrofoam cooler is also a lot easier
So this brings up an important issue. Do you empty the beer out of the cooler or will the MOB like having a cool beer while waiting to be recovered?
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  #85  
Old 01-14-2008
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I was wondering with all the thoughts of the man over board issue, that besides being clipped to ones boat should one not think of other things in the event the clip on fails such as trailing a lenght of rope behind the boat and lines over the side so one can climb back aboard if they do fall over. I read once where a sail boat had been recovered and no one was to be found but with further checking is was noted that the haul seemed to have the markings of finger nail scraps, suggesting the MOB could not get back aboard. I myself and my first mate will soon be heading out for long voyages and aside from other things this is our most concern, of being a MOB
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  #86  
Old 01-14-2008
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Take the beer out... first it'll make the cooler more buoyant and they shouldn't be drinking until they're back on board....consider it motivation for them to get rescued.
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Originally Posted by tenuki View Post
So this brings up an important issue. Do you empty the beer out of the cooler or will the MOB like having a cool beer while waiting to be recovered?
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New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #87  
Old 01-14-2008
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The line behind the boat isn't such a good idea unless the boat is under sail and the line is setup to disconnect the self-steering gear so the boat ends up head to wind and stopped. If the boat is moving at any speed over two knots or so, you won't be able to hold onto the line, much less pull yourself forward and back aboard.

Having a ladder that you can deploy so you can climb back into the boat is an excellent idea. However, such a ladder is only useful if the person in the water is conscious and strong enough to climb it. Make sure any ladder you setup for this purpose has at least two or three steps below the waterline when deployed, since ladders with fewer steps below the waterline are very difficult for most people to climb up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by theartfuldodger View Post
I was wondering with all the thoughts of the man over board issue, that besides being clipped to ones boat should one not think of other things in the event the clip on fails such as trailing a lenght of rope behind the boat and lines over the side so one can climb back aboard if they do fall over. I read once where a sail boat had been recovered and no one was to be found but with further checking is was noted that the haul seemed to have the markings of finger nail scraps, suggesting the MOB could not get back aboard. I myself and my first mate will soon be heading out for long voyages and aside from other things this is our most concern, of being a MOB
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 01-14-2008 at 09:29 PM.
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  #88  
Old 01-16-2008
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I posted this thread in the Gear and Maintenance section, but thought it would be useful to add to this thread as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by scottbr View Post
In the recent e-mail from Sailnet and the thread on the MOB / COB rescue techniques, I had not seen any mention of this new product from Mustang Survival. It is esentially a self-inflating collar on a stick. They claim accuracy up to 100 - 150 ft. away. It allows you to get buoyancy to the victim quickly and accurately and goes farther than a throw rope, rescue ring, or anything else you wish to throw at the victim, including styrofoam plates.

http://www.mustangsurvival.com/rescue_stick/index.php

I saw this at the Toronto Boat Show last weekend and will definately be adding one onboard this spring prior to launch.
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  #89  
Old 01-16-2008
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Quote:
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Take the beer out... first it'll make the cooler more buoyant and they shouldn't be drinking until they're back on board....consider it motivation for them to get rescued.
With a cold brew in my hand will I really be motivated to get them back on board or just motivated to laugh at their misfortune? I suppose there are all sorts of ways of looking at the beer/cooler question. If the beer goes over with the COB, then at least the crew is motivated to retrieve the cooler, in which case the boat may be close enough for the COB to find the swim ladder and crawl out while they are retrieving it. I guess my new strategy will be to tether onto the cooler!
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  #90  
Old 01-16-2008
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Final Report for Crew Overboard Symposium

I thought this thread could use a reference to this report with information that addresses the question of the original post:
http://www.boatus.com/foundation/fin...OBfinalreport/

From the report:
At the Symposium, held August 9-12, 2005 on San Francisco Bay and funded in part by the BoatU.S. Foundation, 115 volunteers conducted almost 400 tests of 40 types of rescue gear and many maneuvers. Using volunteer “victims” who went into the water, testers addressed questions like, “What’s the best way to make contact with the victim?”, “What methods work best for bringing a victim back on deck?”, “Is there any chance of rescuing an unconscious victim?”, and “Do swim platforms help or hinder rescue?”
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