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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #81  
Old 01-19-2008
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Aground standing still

Several years ago my brother and I were bringing my Columbia 29 from Long Island where I had bought her to Florida. Somewhere on the ICW as it was getting towards evening, we anchored in a cove for the night. I checked the depth and we were ok so nothing to worry about. In the early morning hours, the tilt of our bunks woke us up! The tide had gone out and left us with barely 2 feet of water with a 4' draft. Another mitigating event could be that the wind had swung us around into shallower water than where we stopped. In the future we checked the tides and put two anchors out to stop any swing.
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  #82  
Old 01-19-2008
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This is why you're supposed to check the chart for your swinging circle when you anchor out...
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Originally Posted by dvdcnl View Post
Several years ago my brother and I were bringing my Columbia 29 from Long Island where I had bought her to Florida. Somewhere on the ICW as it was getting towards evening, we anchored in a cove for the night. I checked the depth and we were ok so nothing to worry about. In the early morning hours, the tilt of our bunks woke us up! The tide had gone out and left us with barely 2 feet of water with a 4' draft. Another mitigating event could be that the wind had swung us around into shallower water than where we stopped. In the future we checked the tides and put two anchors out to stop any swing.
Rocky coastlines are very pretty, but very unforgiving. From Cape Ann north, going aground is usually a bad thing and a losing proposition for most boats. Even quite a bit of the shoreline in Buzzards Bay is bad news if your boat meets it. Northern California and north is the same way... few sandy beaches—most are hard, nasty, mean rock.
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Oh! this is something you don't want to do in the PNW and ANE of the USA & Canada.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #83  
Old 01-20-2008
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Using halyards to tilt the boat over a sandbar

In April 2007 someone had dredged around the marina at the Northeast River Yacht Club and created a sandbar. A morning race was scheduled and the first boat to head out drawing 7 feet found it but luckily was close enough to the dock so the skipper could toss the main and spinnaker halyards to onlookers on the dock. By pulling on the halyards they tipped the boat over enough so the captain could use his engine to back off the sandbar. Needless to say, with half the race participants stuck in the marina the race was called off and all proceeded to get as tipsy as that boat!
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  #84  
Old 01-21-2008
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BAH! Kedging, tides and towing are for the old folks... I sent the wife and her friend out to hang off the boom. hahaha
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  #85  
Old 01-22-2008
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Thumbs down Hitting the Bottom

Alright is everybody doing to hit the bottom, at some time? Do I spend all my time watching the deep gauge. How many people have gone a ground?
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  #86  
Old 01-22-2008
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End-

There was a thread on going aground in the seamanship forum just recently, suggest you read it.

Do you have up-to-date charts of your sailing area? What boat do you sail? Where do you sail it?

BTW, there are three types of sailors when it comes to going aground. 1) The ones that have and admit it, 2) The ones that have and lie about it, 3) the ones that never leave the dock. There are some that never leave the dock but have gone aground anyways... and will fall into one of the first two categories.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #87  
Old 01-22-2008
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Welcome to the forum, End!

Everybody touches the bottom every once-in-a-while. As you become familiar with the area where you sail, you'll learn where the shallow spots are. Get a chart of the area, and study it. It'll show you most of the shallow spots. Usually, if you're in water that is marked on the chart as being deep, you don't have to watch your depth sounder so carefully. Sometimes you have to sail through a shallow area, and when that happens, slow down so that, if you touch bottom, you won't go hard aground. If you're going slow when you touch bottom, it'll be easier to get free. If you touch, it's usually best to back out the same way that you went in, because you know that the water was deep behind you, just before you touched bottom.

The more familiar you are with the area, the less you'll worry about the depth.
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  #88  
Old 01-22-2008
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In the past four seasons with my 5'-2" draft boat - we only went aground once, and that was a soft grounding in muck. The shallow channel was not sufficiently marked and we were sailing through at about 3 knots with main and mizzen, while carefully following our depth sounder and chartplotter. The bottom suddenly came up from 9 to 3 feet and clamped onto the keel like a vise - stopped us dead in our tracks.

Fortunately it was windy, so unfurled the Genoa, kicked on the iron genny and turned the helm to leeward and deeper water - nice having a 90 hp diesel and 22" 3-blade prop when you need it.
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  #89  
Old 01-22-2008
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I had never touched the bottom until 2 weeks back. I was at the helm taking a boat to a brand new marina. I think that they are probably at about 60-70% capacity at the moment. I had never sailed into that marina before, so I was very careful, going in very, very slow, since the entry channel is really narrow. The boat's draft was 5'-7", I was right in the middle of the channel when all of the sudden the depth sounder went to 4.8 ft really fast. Sure enough we lightly touched bottom...I am guessing that the depth sounder was not very precise. Luckily, the boat kept moving. To make a long story short, we touched bottom two more times, before tying it up.....and this is a brand new marina. Needless to say, the expressions on our faces were worth a millon $$.

Afterwards, we have been talking to other sailboat owners on how they go in and out, and it is a tricky place. Luckily, we talked to the owner of a Beneateau with a draft of almost 8 ft and he gave us the 101 course on that marina.
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  #90  
Old 01-22-2008
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hitting a rock

I hit a large rock last fall in over six feet of water with a four foot draft. My 24 C@C bounced of as I was heeled over. I checked it after haulout and there was only some superficial damage. Later other sailors from our Marina told me they've hit it, too. I guess, it's the price we pay for our water levels in the Great Lakes dropping to record lows. Lake Saint Clair is a historically shallow lake and thankfully, most of the bottom is soft. A previous boat a 24 Shark got jammed up on rocks many years ago but with a steel keel took it with no damage although it took two powerboats to pull me free.
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