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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #41  
Old 04-15-2008
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First it depends on the dingui. If it a inflatable w/ hard bottom or a aluminum or fiber glass dingui, it should have a U bolt in the bow. In that case a rope atached to de bolt an then w/ a bowline to a line that cross the stern of the sailbota from a cleats in each side should work perfect for daisailing. If the dingui is soft or the sailing longer I recommend storing it in a locker or on deck.
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  #42  
Old 04-15-2008
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I have thought about making a tight-fitting cover for the dinghy, ... with a ridgepole (probably mast) stem to stern underneath, It should keep water out. Anyone try that?
Skip,

I did a sunbrella tight fitting cover for a RIB dinghy, the bungees were tight enough the first year to support the cover and keep any water from accumulating, but the second year the bungees needed replacing. So i put up a collapsible pole, BoatersWorld. The only difficulty I had was the bungees attaching just below the dinghy rub rail, otherwise the bungees would have run underneath the hull and there add minimal drag, but accumulate growth.
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  #43  
Old 04-15-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad View Post
You don't stowe the BBQ, ever. What kind of seamanship do you guys practice?? Exactly HOW are you supposed to grill and sail with the BBQ stowed?? Foul weather should never stop a man and his grill... not a real man.

HEHE!

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So to be clear, I don't need to remove the BBQ from my dink when I'm towing it?
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  #44  
Old 04-15-2008
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Has anyone here had experience with the Dinghy Tow system? It's method is to drag a dinghy backwards with only the bow in the water, sort of like a semi-davit. If the dinghy ships any water it is only a bow's-worth and, I guess, would not amount to much. It keeps the dinghy under control in tight quarters, too.
We used a dinghy tow for probably several thousand miles - several times up and down the ICW and in (not to) the Bahamas. We had it swamped once by a Gasshole on the Cape Fear River who thought it would be prudent to run his 6 foot wake right next to our boat. Busted one of the clips that hold the dinghy to the bracket.

Had it come loose on the Albermarle once - same clips came loose in a nasty chop.

And the final straw was in the Bahamas. We were anchored on the Banks between Bimini and Nassau. The wind picked up at about 90 degrees to the rollers that were coming in off the Atlantic. We had tied the mizzen halyard to the painter to hoist the whole dinghy out of the water, but we were bouncing so much it was slamming into the water with a horrible crashing noise about every sixth wave. One of the square pipes of the dinghy tow bent, and the dinghy turned and snugged its side up to our transom - rubbed part of the name off the boat. And ruined the dinghy tow. Needless to say, sleepless night - and I could do nothing - it was as dark as the inside of a cow out there and the boat was a carnival ride.

So we towed or stowed the rest of the trip and we now have a davit system which I'm going to install next chance I get.

My advice echoes a lot of what was said above. Double up on your lines if you're towing and connect to different cleats on the deck and tow points on the dinghy - lines break and so do cleats, d-rings, etc.

I don't think I would purchase a dinghy tow again, though in calm waters it was handy, I don't always sail in calm waters.
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  #45  
Old 04-15-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryandSusanMacDonald View Post
We used a dinghy tow for probably several thousand miles - several times up and down the ICW and in (not to) the Bahamas. We had it swamped once by a Gasshole on the Cape Fear River who thought it would be prudent to run his 6 foot wake right next to our boat. Busted one of the clips that hold the dinghy to the bracket.

Had it come loose on the Albermarle once - same clips came loose in a nasty chop.

And the final straw was in the Bahamas. We were anchored on the Banks between Bimini and Nassau. The wind picked up at about 90 degrees to the rollers that were coming in off the Atlantic. We had tied the mizzen halyard to the painter to hoist the whole dinghy out of the water, but we were bouncing so much it was slamming into the water with a horrible crashing noise about every sixth wave. One of the square pipes of the dinghy tow bent, and the dinghy turned and snugged its side up to our transom - rubbed part of the name off the boat. And ruined the dinghy tow. Needless to say, sleepless night - and I could do nothing - it was as dark as the inside of a cow out there and the boat was a carnival ride.

So we towed or stowed the rest of the trip and we now have a davit system which I'm going to install next chance I get.

My advice echoes a lot of what was said above. Double up on your lines if you're towing and connect to different cleats on the deck and tow points on the dinghy - lines break and so do cleats, d-rings, etc.

I don't think I would purchase a dinghy tow again, though in calm waters it was handy, I don't always sail in calm waters.
Just a warning as I have also pulled a dink on davits and behind for many, many miles - I doubt under most circumstances I would take my tender to sea on davits. It is even sometimes tough in the ICW. If you get into a rolling sea of better than 5+ feet or so (depending on your boat), that thing starts slamming around back there. If you get pooped, it is gone along with part of your transom.

I am not contradicting you at all. Just sharing my experience. But the davits are great at night... cause it is still there in the morning!!!!! I would buy them again in a heartbeat (and did). Just make sure if you raise it on davits for any long runs you really lash it hard for lateral movements.

Good posts and enjoy your contributions.

- CD
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  #46  
Old 04-15-2008
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Cruisingdad:

100% agree. Big seas, or chance thereof - dinghy on deck! Every time I had trouble with the dinghy tow it was unanticipated. Whodathunk a powerboater would have put up a six foot wake ten feet from a sailboat? Oh, yeah, what am I saying?

The other two times the weather reports were good. Whodathunk NOAA would tell tall tales? Oh, yeah, what am I saying?
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  #47  
Old 05-13-2008
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Originally Posted by Valiente View Post
As I am switching to a nesting dinghy and a Portabote, I will likely only tow tenders short distance in the future.
any word on your nester?
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  #48  
Old 06-17-2008
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Hoping to have a new inflatable by the end of the summer

I didn't see the need to start a new thread so i'm just tacking my question onto this one.

I'm thinking that we would tow behind most of the time but during heavier weather we could just deflate and lash it in front of the mast... if not stowing it down below.


Our boat is 27'... would keeping an 8 foot inflatable inflated on the deck be too much and in the way of running rigging? What about the genoa and chafe? I know there is physically enough room on our boat but i feel like it would make things too tight up there. What is your experience?
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Old 06-17-2008
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Originally Posted by Joel73 View Post
I didn't see the need to start a new thread so i'm just tacking my question onto this one.

I'm thinking that we would tow behind most of the time but during heavier weather we could just deflate and lash it in front of the mast... if not stowing it down below.


Our boat is 27'... would keeping an 8 foot inflatable inflated on the deck be too much and in the way of running rigging? What about the genoa and chafe? I know there is physically enough room on our boat but i feel like it would make things too tight up there. What is your experience?
I have a 27 foot Cheoy Lee and sometimes I tow the dink, sometimes I deflate and tie it to the cabin top below the boom and sometimes I stow it down below. It's situational and it is the captain's call. If the weather is good, tow it,i f the weather is bad, stow it. I do not want to end up at a nice tropical anchorage with no way to get ashore.

Buying a new dinghy will cut into my "buying a new case of beer money."
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Old 06-20-2008
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I read all the previous post but still don't know what to expect re the dingy we're getting. Its a Port. Pudgy...And while we had no problems in towing an inflatable, though didn't do it during heavy weather either, this new dingy likely weighs too much to haul aboard but it is self bailing. We have a 30' Morgan so we'll see re davits or that other half davit thing next year, if necessary. B.O.A.T.=Bring Out Another Thousand!
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