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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #11  
Old 01-16-2009
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I will behave myself, I just wanted a good laugh from everyone. That's all. If I did offend anyone, I do whole-heartedly appologize, I love to laugh, and I love everyone around me to laugh. That's all.
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  #12  
Old 01-16-2009
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bubb2 has a spectacular aura about bubb2 has a spectacular aura about bubb2 has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by DNHen View Post
Well, to Americans, a Fender is either a brand of electrical guitar or the thing on either side of an auto. I am still trying to figure out exactly what a "bumber" is, other than the rear end of a very well endowed lovely lady! HAHA!
It's like trying to make sense of what a HAMburger is made of and why it called a hamburger. But we in America know it's a German thing
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  #13  
Old 01-16-2009
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I laughed until tears came. That was a good one. Why is it called a "ham"burger when it is made from beef? Or chicken. Or bison. Or cariboo. Or anything else but pig???
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  #14  
Old 01-16-2009
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Lets face it. The English language can be confusing to anyone who has learned it as a second language.
Various words have several meanings and you really need to know the context of the sentence in order to apply the correct diffinition to that word.
Fender can be a guitar or a device used to fend off other vessels or a pier.
bumbers are on the front or back of a vehicle. Unless it is a bumper crop where your garden have out produce all the other gardens in the area.
Now do you understand what I'm saying? Or do I have to bounce this fender off your head thus raising a bumper crop of bumps.
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  #15  
Old 01-16-2009
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What is the difference between boasun and boatswain? Nothing. In either word, the "t" is either not there or not pronounced. Otherwise, the "vowels" are pronounced the same way. It is pronounced "bow-swain". That is my point. But yes, I will grant you that the words in the English language are confusing. However. some words remain the same, regardless of direct spelling.

Seeman im keine Deutchland ist Seaman in English.

Seeman or Seaman both mean Sailor. Understand where I am coming from?
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Old 01-16-2009
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Dear contributing etymologists:
DNH may not just be a few years late finding the Sailnet website. Did anyone notice the original posting date of this thread? By now, Dirk and his crew have had enough time to all learn Sanskrit, and not need any help with English.
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  #17  
Old 02-11-2009
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Typically, on Lealea commands will go something like this:

"Let go the F@#$%^ dock lines!"
On the starboard tack, hoist the g*&^%$%$# jib, ya @#$%^!"
"Watch the &^%$# boom! #$%^*&!!"
"Get those %$#@^& fenders out of the #$%^& water!"

And so on... Politely, of course

video
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Last edited by vega1860; 02-11-2009 at 11:52 AM.
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Old 02-11-2009
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How do you say 'lederhosen' in Sanskrit?
Some German words are cognates (meaning are similar) to words in English. That is because they both have some common roots.
Fortunately for the German speaking world it's words are a bit more literally translated then the arcane and undecipherable English (whatever brand). Italian may be much more consistent in it's pronunciation but they have nothing over the 'Tchermans'.
An early name for a vehicle that became known as 'der tank' was something like 'schutzen vergrabenzie automobilenzie' (bad spelling) which translated as: shooting, armored automobile. Verstehei?
Passe auf!
I should have been a linguist and I would have been cunning at it.
Cunningham = smart pig?

Hey Dirk,
Where have you und your international crew sailed to und back from since your initial (first) post here? Ja?
Velcomen!
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Old 02-17-2009
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Need for calm language however

Nothing is worse than being shouted at by another adult. It also adds to confusion in situations where calm is needed.

So my two cents here is to always use a clear calm voice.

A good captain can issue clear commands when the heat is on, so why do sailors have such a bad habit of yelling at their crew members when situations call for the need to be clear and calm.
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  #20  
Old 02-18-2009
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Grantheadifen—

Please read the marine industry special interest thread in the Boat Buying forum.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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