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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #11  
Old 06-05-2008
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Double the line back to your cleat, lets you single up all lines before leaving and makes it so you can leave by retrieving your lines instead of having someone on the dock tossing them to you.
US Navy, lesson learned - leave when you want, not when a dockhand is there.
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  #12  
Old 06-05-2008
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THat's more a problem with 600' long ships than boats the size you see here.

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Double the line back to your cleat, lets you single up all lines before leaving and makes it so you can leave by retrieving your lines instead of having someone on the dock tossing them to you.
US Navy, lesson learned - leave when you want, not when a dockhand is there.
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  #13  
Old 06-05-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chucklesR View Post
Double the line back to your cleat, lets you single up all lines before leaving and makes it so you can leave by retrieving your lines instead of having someone on the dock tossing them to you.
US Navy, lesson learned - leave when you want, not when a dockhand is there.

I agree, as long as you're aboard and awake.
If you go ashore for any length of time and the boat is moving much, you do stand a good chance of chafing your lines.

Steve
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Old 06-06-2008
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Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Valiente-

The rail is probably not brightwork, since it is mounted on a dock.
Yes, I reread the OP...oops. Use a ******* grappling hook, then....
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  #15  
Old 06-06-2008
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Two additional options... make a half turn through the rail, and then tie two half hitches or a tautline hitch back to the line. Another way you can go, AFTER you're in, is to tie a bowline and feed the working single end of the line through the rail, back through the bowline and tie off on the boat.
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Originally Posted by knothead View Post
If the line is excessively long I would grab a bight in the standing part of the line and tie a clove hitch. Then, still using the bight, tie two half hitches around the standing part.
I'd do almost the same thing, except I'd do two round turns, rather than a clove hitch.

When our boat was in a temporary slip, just prior to her mast coming down last fall and going back up this spring, this is how her bow lines were secured to rings on the sea wall, and they held like that just fine--through wake from passing craft, and wind and wave from weather.

If I really wanted to make sure, I'd tie a Fisherman's Bend with the bight.

There's a trick to neatly dressing the excess line, using successive small bights passed through one another, that is quickly taken-down by pulling the bitter end out of the last bight and giving the whole thing a tug, but I'm at a loss how to explain it

Jim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEMIJim View Post

There's a trick to neatly dressing the excess line, using successive small bights passed through one another, that is quickly taken-down by pulling the bitter end out of the last bight and giving the whole thing a tug, but I'm at a loss how to explain it

Jim

Jim,

I think you are referring to what is called a chain sinnet or a monkey braid. I used to use it a lot when I was a climber for longer pieces of webbing and runners to keep them reasonably compact yet readily accessible on my harness.

It looks kinda cool too.

Cheers.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEMIJim View Post
I'd do almost the same thing, except I'd do two round turns, rather than a clove hitch.
I'm pretty sure that would work just as well for the short term.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SEMIJim View Post
When our boat was in a temporary slip, just prior to her mast coming down last fall and going back up this spring, this is how her bow lines were secured to rings on the sea wall, and they held like that just fine--through wake from passing craft, and wind and wave from weather.

If I really wanted to make sure, I'd tie a Fisherman's Bend with the bight.Jim

That's a really great knot too.

The thing I like about the clove hitch or running hitch is that the line isn't allowed to move over the surface of the rail or whatever you've secured it to, once the knot has been set.
The Fisherman's bend is great in that it kinda doubles the amount of line that is being chafed and thereby extending it's life, but with a hitch the line won't chafe at all, (or at least very little), at it's point of attachment when the boat starts tugging at her lines.

That's what I like about knots. There is at least one knot for every imaginable situation.
But there are a few knots that will get you through most situations.

Steve

Last edited by knothead; 06-06-2008 at 06:58 PM. Reason: spelling error
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A round turn with two half hitches generally doesn't move or allow the line to chafe.
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  #20  
Old 06-06-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
A round turn with two half hitches generally doesn't move or allow the line to chafe.
You're correct. It's acting like a hitch. (it probably has a name somewhere in Ashley's), That's why I said ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by knothead
I'm pretty sure that would work just as well for the short term

I was refering to the Fisherman's bend when I said....


Quote:
Originally Posted by knothead
The Fisherman's bend is great in that it kinda doubles the amount of line that is being chaffed and thereby extending it's life, but with a hitch the line won't chafe at all, (or at least very little), at it's point of attachment when the boat starts tugging at her lines.
But thanks for keeping an eye on me.
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