Problem leaving the dock...... - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 25 Old 07-02-2008
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With a 27 ft, you could just about walk it down port side finger pier and shove the bow around, then jump on and reverse the stern into the wind a bit more, then shift to forward and drive it out. I've handled my old 30 foot like that with good results (depends on just how strong that prevailing wind is).
In higher winds, springing off the upwind finger pier piling is the best way, I'd have a spring to the downwind piling ready to slip the first couple of times just as a safety. Also put a nice fluffy fender on the upwind finger pier piling so you can rotate around on it and not your gelcoat.
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post #12 of 25 Old 07-02-2008
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The same post by the same person was put on cruisersforum.com a couple of hours before here and attracted 5 replies within an hour.
It takes some time to write detailed responses. Time which is wasted if the question has already been answered elsewhere.
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post #13 of 25 Old 07-02-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris_gee View Post
The same post by the same person was put on cruisersforum.com a couple of hours before here and attracted 5 replies within an hour.
It takes some time to write detailed responses. Time which is wasted if the question has already been answered elsewhere.
I guess the OP is not entitled to more than one opinion?

There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
Shakespeare, Julius Caesar IV, iii, 217
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post #14 of 25 Old 07-02-2008
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I cannot echo Martha's advise enough. Listen to us women! Learn how to spring in and out of any docking situation. Practice this until you get it down cold. I am glad to see I am not the only crazy person who's springlines are a different color than the rest of the lines. Mine are red. Easy to find. With dockline helpers or newbies, it is easy to give out instructions that are EASYLY understood by everyone. Jack Klang videos and books are a must in every sailors library. Losing control of your boat is not a good situation under any circumstances. You will hurt something more than your pride or ego if things go badly astray.

Melissa Renee
Moondance
Catalina 445, Hull #90

Last edited by Melrna; 07-02-2008 at 03:53 PM.
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post #15 of 25 Old 07-02-2008
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Good idea having your spring lines a different color than the other dock lines.

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I cannot echo Martha's advise enough. Listen to us women! Learn how to spring in and out of any docking situation. Practice this until you get it down cold. I am glad to see I am not the only crazy person who's springlines are a different color than the rest of the lines. My are red. Easy to find. With dockline helpers or newbies, it is easy to give out instructions that are EASYLY understood by everyone. Jack Klang videos and books are a must in every sailors library. Losing control of your boat is not a good situation under any circumstances. You will hurt something more than your pride or ego if things go badly astray.

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post #16 of 25 Old 07-02-2008
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I agree with ChucklesR, even though we have lots of room behind Paloma to back out, we walk her out of the slip and give her a hard shove in the right direction before stepping on and motoring on our way.

s/v Paloma, Bristol 29.9, #141
Slipped in Bahia Marina, easy access to Corpus Christi Bay and the Gulf of Mexico.
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post #17 of 25 Old 07-02-2008
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I agree with the prior posts regarding backing in. At our marina everyone backs in (both power and sail) because of very tight slips and short finger piers. We use the springlines as others have suggested to keep the boat centered while backing in, particulary in wind and also to counteract the prop walk. I also rigged fixed lines from the pilings at the end of our slip to the dock, which help to keep the boat centered when the winds and current are not cooperating. They also help to keep the neighbor's boats in their respective slips (not everyone is as careful as one would like).
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post #18 of 25 Old 07-02-2008
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I also do the walk the boat out of the slip, then shove off and hop on. I have a strong current in my marina and this has been the best way for me to get out...just make sure you don't miss that step on the boat because it's a doosie if you do.

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post #19 of 25 Old 07-02-2008
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Why is it important to go bow out? In my slip, most times I'm able to go bow out. However, when the wind is blowing snot out of the west, I just know I'm going stern out. Either way works.

Having said that, if it is that important to you, the line methods described above are appropriate (just more work) :-)

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post #20 of 25 Old 07-02-2008
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To avoid the effects of prop walk I accelerate quickly with the rudder centered then shift to neutral when I have enough flow over the rudder to steer.
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