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post #471 of 499 Old 11-10-2011
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And what's sickeningly crazy about them is that they appeared to be a confused sea (short-period, steep waves jumping up everywhere) - not just swells!

If that doesn't give you the old pucker - nothing will. Insane.


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post #472 of 499 Old 11-10-2011
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It is hard to believe that there are too many under 50 foot boats that would survive that.
I dunno. Depends on whether you believe in the "albatross" or "corked wine bottle" model of small boat behavior in a storm.

In deep water, when the waves get really big, they also get really long. From the perspective of a small boat (or an albatross or corked wine bottle bobbing on the surface), the seas may be steep but they're not that rough. So as long as you can remain buoyant and handle steep waves, you should be okay in a small boat.

Of course this assumes breaking waves aren't an issue, and breaking is a function of steepness. But in this video if you look past the effects of the ship's bow crashing through the crests, I didn't see a lot of breaking waves.

There are heavy weather tactics that purport to deal with both steep seas and breaking waves.
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post #473 of 499 Old 11-10-2011
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I
Of course this assumes breaking waves aren't an issue, and breaking is a function of steepness. But in this video if you look past the effects of the ship's bow crashing through the crests, I didn't see a lot of breaking waves.
I'm not sure I agree with you on this one. What I saw looked like 60+ foot waves with the tops of maybe 10-15 foot of whitewater coming at them. I'm assuming the freeboard on this ship is about 60 feet loaded. You can see some of this when they shoot out the port wheelhouse window.
If you ran off in these conditions with a drogue, you would take some serious whitewater at the companionway. If you fore-reached and the whitewater didn't knock you beam on, you might be OK, but that is a big IF. If you stuck out a parachute sea anchor it would be one monstrous battle against chafe, and if you won that, would you have a rudder when you were done.

There really are times at sea where you just are overwhelmed in a small boat. These pics looks like one of them.

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post #474 of 499 Old 12-17-2011
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What's the difference between VOR racers and normal sailors? These guys actually CHASE DOWN tropical storms to SAIL IN THEM! Volvo Ocean Race 2011-2012 | Golden ticket for Groupama as Sanya gamble in the north


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post #475 of 499 Old 01-11-2012
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Anyone seen this movie? Check out the wave smack at about 1:20!



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post #476 of 499 Old 01-12-2012
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There seem to be more than a few who have experienced Heavy weather in the Gulf of Mexico.

I have learned from experience that the forecast of "slight chance of thunderstorms" doesn't always mean mostly clear calm conditions. A major storm with waterspouts, and pebble sized hail can brew up in short order.

IF it is between you and the coast heading in may not even be an option.

One tactic I have used successfully, (it worked great), that is always an option on the gulf coast, is to find a large oil rig, and heave to in it's lee.

I could see huge waves hit the rig, and split in two, to pass by on either side of me. My boat got barely a ripple. The wind was so severe the tops of the waves were pulled off in sheets, but as long as I could keep the boat in the "slick" created by the rig the effect on the boat was day and night as far as noise, wind, no more hailstones to the face, and calm quiet seas.

Definately a good thing to try in the future. I didn't need to do anything else to prep the boat.
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post #477 of 499 Old 01-12-2012
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That's actually a great piece of advice Bill. I hadn't thought of that as an option. And, as I've discovered, there sure are plenty of those things out there!


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post #478 of 499 Old 01-12-2012
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One problem, as I see it, is that when you're actually in the sh**, you don't really have time to evaluate your actions. If you survive, you assume that it was because of what you did, but it may well be in spite of what you did (or because of what you didn't do).

Even though I recorded my thoughts shortly after a harrowing experience sailing through a typhoon in a 28' boat, I am still not sure whether running before the storm was the best course of action.

I am not even sure that having "been there, done that" is any real advantage. I (luckily) have not been in anything remotely like that since and hope I never am again. I can take some comfort from the fact that I handled the situation without panic and, eventually, brought my vessel into port without outside assistance (sans a mast and accompanying rigging). But, other than that slight comfort, I am not sure what I would do or not do next time -- for one thing, that was one specific instance and every instance is going to be slightly different.
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post #479 of 499 Old 01-12-2012
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Originally Posted by sneuman View Post
One problem, as I see it, is that when you're actually in the sh**, you don't really have time to evaluate your actions. If you survive, you assume that it was because of what you did, but it may well be in spite of what you did (or because of what you didn't do).

Even though I recorded my thoughts shortly after a harrowing experience sailing through a typhoon in a 28' boat, I am still not sure whether running before the storm was the best course of action.

I am not even sure that having "been there, done that" is any real advantage. I (luckily) have not been in anything remotely like that since and hope I never am again. I can take some comfort from the fact that I handled the situation without panic and, eventually, brought my vessel into port without assistance (sans a mast and accompanying rigging). But, other than that slight comfort, I am not sure what I would do or not do next time -- for one thing, that was one specific instance and every instance is going to be slightly different.
A typhoon??? Dude, where is that write up?!?!?!?


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post #480 of 499 Old 01-12-2012
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A typhoon??? Dude, where is that write up?!?!?!?
It looks like it's still online. Mind you, this was for a general audience, so a lot of the sailor details are left out.:

http://asap.ap.org/stories/510321.s
http://asap.ap.org/stories/512278.s
http://asap.ap.org/stories/514506.s
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