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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #41  
Old 11-12-2008
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learning curve

Things that do not kill you, only make you stronger

I read that somewhere. There are worse things that can happen to you than meeting your maker in a storm...........................

DW
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  #42  
Old 11-12-2008
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My advice is to find some likeminded, competent sailors to join you, pick a day where the wind is a constant 30 plus knots, but under 45 knots. Anything over 45 is just too uncomfortable close to land, remember you are doing his for fun not necessity. Set your main at the dock with your smallest reef 2nd or if you have one 3rd. It is much easier to shake out a reef than put one in. Go out and play. First try hooving too under bare poles, then with a small main then add some headsail feel the difference in the boats attitude. Try sailing downwind with just a small section of head sail and no main, try different points of sail. If you have storm sails try them, better now than when you really need them. The only way to find what you particular boat likes is to get out and do it when you are fresh and prepared. You may just surprise yourself.
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  #43  
Old 11-12-2008
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Agreed. That's one of the reasons I sailed in nasty weather last year.
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  #44  
Old 11-12-2008
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Valiente,

How would you go about rigging a downhaul for a foresail?

-Spencer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valiente View Post
I prefer going out undercanvased when high winds are predicted, but have yet to appear. And to rig a downhaul on the foresail...it makes things significantly more controlled and yet is a simple thing to rig.
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  #45  
Old 11-12-2008
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Run the line from the top most hank or so down along the luff of the sail, threading it through or attaching to the hanks to a block located near the base of the forestay and then run it back to the cockpit.

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Valiente,

How would you go about rigging a downhaul for a foresail?

-Spencer
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  #46  
Old 11-12-2008
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I need one for my Staysail so I don't have to send anyone forward in the slop.
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  #47  
Old 11-13-2008
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bobmc - thanks for the walkthrough on heaving to. It seems like one of those extremely basic sailing terms that "everyone should know". I see them used in the books I'm going through - but never quite explained the way you explained it. Thanks again.

omatako - I'm actually looking at the CC for my cruising boat. So now another reason to like them. I just finished "Heavy Weather Sailing" (the book) - and they definitely come down on the side of the chute-off-the-bow technique. I'm starting to think that if I have a "GaleRider" aboard, that might give me the best of both worlds (off the bow or stern). I'm going to look into that more. As for the rudder issue, I hadn't thought of the reverse motion hammering it. In the off-the-bow technique - I suppose you'd just lash/lock the wheel to center? Anything else that one would need to think about there?

Duckwheat - Looks like that fish you're holding got the short-end of the "Existentialism", eh? Agree with your quote.

Simon - hey, dude! Great advice. I'm starting to do that - but in smaller conditions for now since I'm so new at this. But I totally agree with you about preparing one's self through practice. I'll tell you though, thinking about going out in 40 knts right now makes me gulp pretty hard. Holy crap. But I'll get there someday soon. Have a great time in Oz - and if you happen to head up into the Solomon Islands let me know. I lived on Guadalcanal for 2 yearts. I can hook you up with some beetle nut.

Thanks all. It's very cool to talk with real sailors about this stuff. You guys rock.
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  #48  
Old 11-19-2008
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Thanks guys this is a great thread, I would recommend the The Complete Riggers Apprentice to anyone that is considering cruising. The tools of rigging will prove very valuable after heavy weather breaks something, which it will. The adage that duct-tape can fix anything might be somewhat true on a boat, but line and knots WILL fix any sailing component on a vessel.

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  #49  
Old 11-19-2008
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I grew up landlocked and knew no sailors when I started out so learned everything to start with by reading every book and magazine I could get my hands on. Then with only two voyages to my credit managed to talk my way into a delivery job (I had read enough to sound like I knew something) and had my trial by fire. Would not recommend this but managed with a little trial and error, to put into practise what I had read.
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Old 11-19-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Run the line from the top most hank or so down along the luff of the sail, threading it through or attaching to the hanks to a block located near the base of the forestay and then run it back to the cockpit.
Sorry...didn't catch this last week at all.

I concur entirely with SD. That's a great way to douse a sail either from the mast or from the cockpit, depending on where you have your stoppers.

You can either tie or shackle the line to the topmost hank, the thimble at the head or even to the jib halyard itself. The line needn't be heavy, nor should it require much effort to do much more than aid gravity and speed up the process. If you are head to wind and have high enough lifelines or netting, the foresail will more or less "self-flake" and if you tighten both sheets and the downhaul and the halyard (obviously not too tight!), you can usually keep the sail safely down on deck "pinned", which is one less thing to worry about if you are steering or trying to get the main down also.

I don't always put a jib downhaul in, but I don't necessarily wait for heavy weather to do it. Solo sailing in fresher breezes, with even a chance that the autopilot might be overwhelmed, and I'll rig it so I can go no farther forward than the mast.
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