Singlehanding a gaff ketch. - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 22 Old 11-27-2008
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doesn't tow a dinghy daysailing.
did swim the anchor far enough.
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post #12 of 22 Old 12-17-2008
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I sailed a 37 ft gaff rigged ketch with topsails and three jibs, for 8 years (until it sank in the bay of Biscay1.December this year) single handed. But it helps a lot having an autopilot. The ship reached hull speed (7,5 knots) with around 25 knots wind-speed. Then it is time to reduce the sail area. If sailing against the wind, I took down the jibs first then topsails, if the sailing with the wind the topsails came down first, then the jibs, if the wind increased above 25 knots. The first jib went down anyway when the wind was more than 20 knots.

The topsails are the trickiest to get down, so lazy-jacks are a must. If the wind was weak, under 6 knots, and the current strong, then I would need help from the engine to bout the ship.

Bouting (is that the proper word for turning ship?) must be taken in steps, first steer the ship directly in the wind, tighten the sheets on both sides, the steer to the course and release the sheets on the wind side and tighten on the lee side. Single handed that may be difficult without an autopilot, depending of course on the size and weight of the ship.

Use your head, ram the wall till it falls.
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post #13 of 22 Old 12-17-2008
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I
Bouting (is that the proper word for turning ship?) must be taken in steps, first steer the ship directly in the wind, tighten the sheets on both sides, the steer to the course and release the sheets on the wind side and tighten on the lee side. Single handed that may be difficult without an autopilot, depending of course on the size and weight of the ship.
Bout (from "about", as in "put the ship about") is an obsolete term in English, T., at least for pleasure-craft sailing.

The usual terms are "tacking" (putting the bow through the wind) and "gybing" (putting the stern through the wind). Gybing used to be called "wearing about" or "wearing ship", but these are terms more associated with square-riggers of previous centuries.

Some older directional terms are still used by the more informed sort of sailor, simply because they are more precise and less likely to cause confusion. Such terms include "abeam" (which I usually take as the midpoint of the ship), "abaft" (tending toward the stern or "behind" an object on deck), "athwartships" (across the beam, such as the way I want to set up the berths in my aft cabin!) and so on.

But it is quite possible to encounter sailors who do not even use "port" or "starboard". I find this curious, because the language of sailing tends to be very exact and free from ambiguity. It may sound to the landsperson like an affectation or a series of anachronisms, but I do not think so. Every trade (and sailing was a trade for many thousands of years) develops its own specialist language, and sailing terms in English reflect the lore of many nations...as a Scandinavian would know from the most common sailing words, many of which are Viking in origin.
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post #14 of 22 Old 12-17-2008
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Thank you Valiente for upgrading my English. When I was young there really were only two courses of career, either one became a sailor or one continued schooling after primary school. (seven years at that time). Obviously if one went to school for the eighth year one was not a sailor and thus English terms for sailing was absent in the education.

So I more or less hope that a translation of the Norwegian terms will do the trick.

Use your head, ram the wall till it falls.
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post #15 of 22 Old 12-17-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valiente View Post
Gybing used to be called "wearing about" or "wearing ship",
My understanding is that "wearing ship" refers specifically from turning from one upwind tack to the other by first bearing away (i.e. by gybing). This was preferred to tacking ship on a square-rigged due to the limited ability of such ships to sail upwind.

I have this strange feeling that I've seen the term used to refer to turning from one downwind tack to t'other by first heading up (i.e. by tacking), which I imagine is useful in a fore-and-aft rigged ship to reduce stresses on the rigging and other dangers of bringing the boom across in strong winds.

In other words, I feel like "wearing" means "coming about the long way".

When you gaff-rigged folks say "topsails", do you mean those triangular sails that whose foot is the gaff and whose head is the masthead? Or do you have square topsails hung from a yard?

p.s. can we see pictures of your gaff-rigged boats?
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post #16 of 22 Old 12-17-2008
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Having lost everything when I lost my ship, the only pictures that I have are those that I already have posted on different web-sites. Here is one that I have posted here:

What is the age of your boat?

When I use the term "topsail" I mean a triangular sail that is above the gaff, although there are gaff rigs that may have rectangular topsail. The following link illustrates:

Topsail - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Use your head, ram the wall till it falls.
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post #17 of 22 Old 12-18-2008
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Wow, she was a beauty. Sorry for your loss. I am glad you're still here to tell the story.
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post #18 of 22 Old 12-18-2008
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So I more or less hope that a translation of the Norwegian terms will do the trick.
Surprisingly, that is often the case.

Sailing, whether in navies or in merchant service, was the first United Nations. It brought together a wide variety of people who tended to use each others' sailing terms until they found a popular choice. The more I sail with people from other countries, the more terms I hear that I assumed were English, but obviously aren't. At least, not originally.
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post #19 of 22 Old 02-01-2009
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...and if you have two hands you're at an advantage.
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post #20 of 22 Old 02-02-2009
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Valiente—

Wearing ship is not gybing technically, it is as Adam said—a way of going from one upwind point of sail to another by turning the boat downwind and then back upwind so as not to risk getting caught in irons. Some of the less well designed multihulls, usually charter catamarans, I've seen have to do this since they don't have the mass or inertia to coast through the eye of the wind and have far too much windage for them to try making a tack normally.

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

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