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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #21  
Old 01-19-2009
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Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice
Sway..stick to the politics...really (VBG)
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  #22  
Old 01-19-2009
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One of the key things to successful docking is knowing the characteristics of your particular boat. Boats vary tremendously in behavior in forward or reverse; windage; stopping distance; turning radius; prop wash; etc. Spend time with your boat in differing conditions and not in close quarters to learn how it behaves. It will make it much easier when you are docking for real.
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  #23  
Old 01-20-2009
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Originally Posted by Giulietta View Post
Sway..stick to the politics...really (VBG)
Anybody who uses their anchors the way most people string Christmas lights should be making their comments in the Bass fishing forum. Perhaps cod, in this case. (g)
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  #24  
Old 01-20-2009
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Giu,

Don't take my comments personally. Actually I wasn't writing about you or anyone else's post. That's just the way I do it when it's really bad. After some embarrassing experiences and being rescued by the dock committee one time too many I really like a process where, if necessary, I can stop and contemplate my next move. Warping into the dock in really bad conditions does that for me. All you have to do at first is get close to a piling. No prayers required. Frankly, most of the time it's more work to warp in but I'm always in absolute control. My comment about knowing your boat is, I think, really important. I could do things with the Pearson that the Islander just won't do, so I also need a process that offers the control the boat won't give me.

Most of the time I agree entirely with you. If you are too tentative you'll drift past your slip before you get there. I was pulling into a slip in Jacksonville in a pretty heavy crosswind and had to aim at a slip three away from the one I wanted to get into. There were three guys standing on the dock waiting to save me from the inevitable crash. We slipped in pretty as you please and the Dockmaster said "Nice job". That's a good feeling.

Dick


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Originally Posted by Giulietta View Post
Dick,

I don't think anyone here said to com in hot at full steam like the Titanic about to hit the iceberg.

The trick is momentum, not speed..a slow boat in gear has more momentum than a slow boat with gear disengaged (up to a certain level), slowly bobing around to place.

The idea I was transmitting is to come in positively, (that theory of coming in at the speed you would like to hit the pier is very nice when the conditions are calm)..and thus keep control of the boat, before wind or current picks it.

Maybe was the way I wrote it.
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  #25  
Old 01-20-2009
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Sway- "Cleared Anchors"???? For real??? Do you really want to have to worry about anchor rodes potentially fouling during a docking proceedure? I can just see these cleared anchors tangling with the dock lines of other boats during a failed approach.

Maybe you should have them sail past the slip, drop 2 anchors as they pass, and then warp the boat in??!!!!
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Last edited by T34C; 01-20-2009 at 10:07 AM.
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  #26  
Old 01-20-2009
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Sway- "Cleared Anchors"???? For real??? Do you really want to have to worry about anchor rodes potentially fouling during a docking proceedure? I can just see these cleared anchors tangling with the dock lines of other boats during a failed approach.

Maybe you should have them sail past the slip, drop 2 anchors as they pass, and then warp the boat in??!!!!
I knew it....I was surprized it didn't arrive earlier...you guys are flexing....

I can only imagine...coming in cascais to dock and throw the anchor....

eheheheh

But again..my boat's not steel and I don't have 500.000.000 tons displacment..nor do I have a port, a starboard and a stern anchor....I try..but no.
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Old 01-20-2009
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Originally Posted by Giulietta View Post
I knew it....I was surprized it didn't arrive earlier...you guys are flexing....

I can only imagine...coming in cascais to dock and throw the anchor....

eheheheh

But again..my boat's not steel and I don't have 500.000.000 tons displacment..nor do I have a port, a starboard and a stern anchor....I try..but no.
I think they must do a lot of Med. mooring on those lakes over in MI.
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  #28  
Old 01-20-2009
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You know, I'm glad you guys are scratching your heads over that whole anchor thing too. I'm certainly no Destroyer Captain (BTW-is that the holy grail of stinkpotting?) so I don't know enough to really judge it one way or another - but it sure sounded weird for a sailboat.

When I think about dragging anchors all over my marina I have a very clear vision of disaster - or at least loud laughter coming from the cockpits of surrounding boats. Kind of like wearing a bow-tie to a strip joint.

Sway, I for one don't doubt you at all. And to quiet these nay-saying Philistines, I'll give you 21 bucks to put up a video illustrating the technique on your 21-footer (that's a buck a foot). Who else will throw in some juice?
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  #29  
Old 01-20-2009
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Thanks for the information. I'll try to put it to good use. I'm sure others will also.
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  #30  
Old 01-21-2009
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Talking

Docking is often perceived as more difficult than it actually is because of the potential for damage to expensive boats (yours or the one you might hit)!

The key is to figure out which direction your boat will be blown (or carried by current) once it enters the slip. Usually, one or two lines will hold the boat in place while you get situated so you want to be sure to get the lines on that oppose the wind direction and not worry about the others.

This might be a spring line from the end of the finger to a midship cleat if the wind is from behind as you enter, or maybe you need to grab a bow line to keep from being blown back out. You also can use you engine to hold the boat where you want it, once you are in the slip. Usually one strategically placed line and the propeller turning is enough to hold the boat in place. Don't be afraid to turn the rudder to control which way the engine pushes the boat. If you have a spring line on keeping the boat from going forward, the engine in forward can push the bow left or right when the rudder is turned, even if you are not moving forward. Also put fenders out using the same logic, but make sure they are not going to snag on pilings or dock fingers.

As other have said, you basically have to keep the boat moving with enough way on to maintain steerage, but not so much way that you cannot stop the boat before it hits the end of the dock. This comes with practice, but don't be bashful about using lots of reverse when you need it.

If you are coming into a dock with pilings on the outboard end, someone can stand amidships on the upwind side and drop a loop over the piling as the boat passes the piling. Then slip that line around a cleat or winch and gently take up tension as you slow the boat.

Beware of helpers on the dock. Inexperienced help can be worse than no help. Tell them what you want them to do LOUDLY. Often a dock hand will grab a bow line and cleat it off tight before the boat is stopped. this causes the bow to swing in and consequently the stern to swing out usually so far you cannot reach the piling/cleat and end up against the opposite side if there is one.

Practice is key and you can practice in light airs using your heavy air technique so you know what to do.

Have fun!

Colin Ward, Mandalay (formerly)
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