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-   -   Jib sheet knots (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/seamanship-navigation/51076-jib-sheet-knots.html)

lancelot9898 02-02-2009 12:47 PM

Jib sheet knots
 
I can't seem to find the thread where I read about tying a knot unto a jib. I use a bowline having two seperate lines to the yankee, but someone told about just using a continuous line passing a loop at midpoint through the clew and then putting both or just one line through that loop. Not sure if it was both or just one line?? The reason for asking is that when I tack with my cutter rig the yankee will sometimes get hungup on the staysail baby stay. It's hanging up on the knots tied in the clew of the yankee and it seems like a continuous line will offer less area.

US27inKS 02-02-2009 01:00 PM

I use a continuous jib sheet. I just passed the center of the line made into a loop, through the clew, then passed both ends through the loop. I've seen some guys use a fisherman's bend for this, but then it's just about impossible to untie.

I'm sure someone else can offer a more secure solution, but this works well for me.

JohnRPollard 02-02-2009 01:16 PM

We do it as US27 described -- works fine. It is a bit lower profile at the clew than two separate bowlines, so might reduce somewhat the hang-up on the staysail.

Just a note on terminology. In my experience, the term "continuous" jib sheet usually refers to a single sheet, with an end tied at the clew of the sail, then led aft along one side of the boat to the cockpit (through sheet leads), where it spans the cockpit, then continues through the sheet leads back up the other side of the boat, where the other end of the line is tied off to the clew. Many smaller racing style boats are set up like this.

I think it would be more apt to describe the arrangement discussed here simply as a single sheet?

Wayne25 02-02-2009 01:17 PM

The knot described above for a single sheet is called a Larks head The Girth, Strap, Cow, Lanyard Hitch, or Lark's Head
I have a sheet attached with a larkshead for all of my head sails so I only have to feed them through the fairleads when the sail is changed. Works well on my 25 footer.
I was cautioned about using snap shackles at the clew due to injury if you happen to be forward on deck and have a flapping clew flying around with a half pound of metal on it.

AdamLein 02-02-2009 01:21 PM

If you were reading about it recently, then it was probably this most useful and enlightened thread spawned by Giulietta.

heinzir 02-02-2009 01:30 PM

I know there is a better name for it but it escapes me at the moment. The most descriptive is "luggage tag" hitch. This is how I attach my jib sheets; they also used to hang up on the inner forestay.

I attach my staysail sheets with this soft toggle arrangement; they have never flogged loose in over 30 years of sailing. It is easily undone and allows me to reef the staysail quickly.

http://inlinethumb59.webshots.com/42...600x600Q85.jpg

AdamLein 02-02-2009 01:48 PM

Heinzer: very interesting setup, but I'm not sure I'm interpreting the photo correctly. Is it an eye spliced into the middle of a the sheet, and then passed through the grommet? Also, how is the... purple thing constructed? Is it stiffened in any way?

I'm surprised to hear that it doesn't hang up on an inner stay, especially the protruding part.

heinzir 02-02-2009 03:50 PM

Quote:

Heinzer: very interesting setup, but I'm not sure I'm interpreting the photo correctly. Is it an eye spliced into the middle of a the sheet, and then passed through the grommet?
Yes, the eye is formed with a Brummel splice.

Quote:

Also, how is the... purple thing constructed? Is it stiffened in any way?
The purple toggle is a piece of old 3/8" double-braid sheet doubled over. I stiffened it slightly by using hot-melt glue to hold the two sides together and then put a whipping over the whole thing. I could simply have used a larger diameter stiffer line but this is what I had.

Quote:

I'm surprised to hear that it doesn't hang up on an inner stay, especially the protruding part.
It probably would. I use this on the staysail (set on the inner stay) on my cutter rig. This sail does not overlap the shrouds so there is nothing to get hung up on.

I use a similar attachment for my asymmetrical spinnaker and my drifter sheets. This lets me use the same sheets for either sail. I keep the sheets rigged on deck even when not using either large sail.
I tack/jibe the drifter/spinnaker through the slot between the inner and outer forestays just like a genoa. These sheets do occasionally hang up on the inner forestay but a quick tug releases them.

I use the lanyard "luggage tag" hitch on my jib, flown on the outer forestay. It has never hung up on the inner forestay itself but would frequently get caught on one of the piston hanks of the (inner) staysail. I solved this by replacing the offending hank with a smooth carabiner.

IslanderGuy 02-02-2009 04:43 PM

Thanks Heinzer, I have been looking for a simple and reliable way to make a single sheet removable to use with multiple sails. We have not had our boat long, but I quickly tired of pulling the the sheets out of the blocks every time I changed sails and having to re-rig the whole thing.

I did come up with a temporary fix for last summer, but ended up with a large knot flailing around in the wind which did land a few good blows, enough to let me know that was NOT a long term solution. :)

Thanks!

lancelot9898 02-02-2009 04:48 PM

A lot of good info posted! Thanks


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