Attaching snubber to chain... - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 30 Old 03-01-2009 Thread Starter
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Attaching snubber to chain...

or when using dual anchors (bahamian or hamerlock):

I have used:
* Chain hooks - I've never had one come off, but I've always wondered; do they ever come off? I use these on a bridle, where the rode is still attached to the boat.
* Slings with prusick hitches (I know some use a rolling hitch) - eventually chafe is a concern. Quick and easy for a bridle.
* Long-D shackles, carefully sized, not through the links but across like a chain hook. I suppose the shackle could stretch under extreme load and slide, but it should stay on. I use this mostly when using a bahamian moor - it allows me to connect the rodes away from the boat and avoid twists.

I have G5 chain and so getting anything through the link that is strong enough is not possible. Many quickly say" shackle the chains together - nope - not enough room between the links on this chain. On other chains, yes there is, and that would be a simple solution.

With the latter 2 methods I install the sling or shackle between the windlass and the roller and then let the chain out to make the final attachment on the other side, rather than lean over the bow to fool with it. The chain hook is easy enough to attach while leaning.

Has anyone tried either the Wichard locking chain hook or the Kong Chain Gripper? Will either fit over the roller, so that I do not have to fool with them leaning over the bow?

Because I have a catamaran and use a bridle every time, this is a nightly concern. Though I have never had a failure of any sort, there is always room for improvement.

(when asked how he reached the starting holds on a difficult rock climbing problem that clearly favored taller climbers - he was perhaps 5'5")

"Well, I just climb up to them."

by Joe Brown, English rock climber




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post #2 of 30 Old 03-01-2009
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We use a hook..I think its Wichard but definitely not locking.

I've heard say that they bend or even break but even in a stinking southerly gale when we dragged half a boats length and were in waves you could have surfed (at a pinch) the thing did not give.

I find it comes up over the anchor roller with nary a complaint and I've yet to have it come off by itself even when there is no strain on the snubbing line.

To deploy I usually just let out the chain to required scope then hook on and let out a few more metres.

Andrew B

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post #3 of 30 Old 03-02-2009
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I'm the same as TW, use a anchor hook for the last two years no problems. I also use a double bridle to keep the boat centred and avoiding chaf on the bobstay.

Just sat through a 20-30kt strong wind last night & had no problemo (plenty of other things went wrong over the weekend ah well.

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post #4 of 30 Old 03-02-2009
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Putting anything into a link is a bad idea, as the links are likely to deform and fail. I'd recommend a chain hook. The best one I've used is basically a flat rectangular plate of stainless steel with two holes and a slot. The slot goes around the chain, a shackle can attach to each hole, so you can either use it as a snubber or as a bridle.

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post #5 of 30 Old 03-02-2009 Thread Starter
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I like tha idea - custom fabrication, or do you have a source?

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Putting anything into a link is a bad idea, as the links are likely to deform and fail. I'd recommend a chain hook. The best one I've used is basically a flat rectangular plate of stainless steel with two holes and a slot. The slot goes around the chain, a shackle can attach to each hole, so you can either use it as a snubber or as a bridle.
Is it rated for use in a wide angle (45- to 90-degree) bridle? The resulting pull will be apart, which may change things a bit, though not greatly, depending on the design.

Is there a provision to prevent the surely remote possibility of the chain jumping out? Depending on the position of the holes, a simple latch plate would be simple (a small plate with matching holes that crossed the slot).

Second Sailingdog's comment on "nothing through the link"; that has been the conventional wisdom and I have seen the after effect when loaded hard in a rigging application. A screwed up link.

(when asked how he reached the starting holds on a difficult rock climbing problem that clearly favored taller climbers - he was perhaps 5'5")

"Well, I just climb up to them."

by Joe Brown, English rock climber




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post #6 of 30 Old 03-02-2009
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A friend of mine made me mine, but I've seen them commercially available.

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post #7 of 30 Old 03-02-2009
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Quote:
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A friend of mine made me mine, but I've seen them commercially available.

Sounds a step up from what we now have...pics ?

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Basically looks a lot like this:


from Steve Dashew's Setsail.com site.

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post #9 of 30 Old 03-02-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Basically looks a lot like this:


from Steve Dashew's Setsail.com site.
Nice. I like it.

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post #10 of 30 Old 03-02-2009
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We use a basic old chain hook. From there a line comes off with an actual snubber (a rubber snubber). From there, we have two lines to tie on to two seperate cleats forward to spread the load. Hope that makes sense?? Works VERY well.

The chain hook will come off. I have heard say that it will wear the chain too if you keep using the same link, so spread it around. We actually use a cheap little bungie cord to hold on the chain hook. It takes no strain... just keeps the hook from falling off.

You can make your own. It is really simple.

Brian

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