How to improve my boat and sails for +20kts wind? - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 12 Old 09-09-2009 Thread Starter
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How to improve my boat and sails for +20kts wind?

From 4-15kts wind my boat sails great. 15-20 is lively, I tighten backstay, put the (only) reef in the mainsail, and roll in the Genoa 10 turns max. A bit more wind than that though, I start to have issues going upwind. Rolling up the Genoa further makes the sail baggy and the boat starts to get cranky. Furling the Genoa entirely and sailing with just the mainsail is peaceful but the boat is slow and appears to make a lot of leeway. I have sailed just with reefed genoa OK but I heard this puts a lot of stress on the rig? Ultimately I just furl away the genoa and motor w/reefed mainsail unfortunately. I'd like to be able to sail in +20kts.

My setup now:
130% Genoa on roller-furling, sheet blocks are on toe-rail.
Mainsail w/1 reef point

Any suggestions? Do I just need a good working jib? Would be an ordeal to lower the genoa and hoist jib every time the wind kicked up.

1980 S2 9.2A (30') in Anacortes, WA
Aux power 13hp Volvo MD7A

Last edited by FishFinder; 09-09-2009 at 04:44 PM.
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post #2 of 12 Old 09-09-2009
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How old is your mainsail? I had the same kind of issues you're describing. I had an old blown out mainsail, and in any kind of wind the boat would be over on its ear (even reefed). I purchased a new mainsail last season, and it's amazing how much better the boat performs with an actual sail (vs and an old bag). Now when the wind picks up the boats stands up and sails, rather than being blown sideways.
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post #3 of 12 Old 09-09-2009
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The sails sound worn, and no foam in the luff of the headsail? Stretched sails will put you on your ear, and going to windward sluggish.......i2f

20 MPH ain't fast unless, you do it in a 1000sq 3/2 house on 10foot waves
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post #4 of 12 Old 09-09-2009
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You need a good working jib. A roller furling genoa, even a brand new one with luff pads/tapes to assist in furled shape, will end up baggy when furled more than 20%. If I'll be sailing for even a few hours, I always take 10 minutes to switch down to the small jib, although it is a pain to dump the large genoa. I just stuff it down the forward hatch and hope to put it back on again before I need the v berth.

That said, having a small jib with a full or reefed main makes for very nice handling in 20-28 or so, after which just the small jib works good to mid 30's or so. Definately the way to go.

You should make sure that you can and do put in a tight reef, i.e. the reef clew trims aft and back to touch the boom and a lot of halyard tension... and put your traveller to leeward as useful.

A final point is if you really care about performance you should consider an inboard jib track for the small jib, which is just a valuable for the small sail and it is for the genoa. Gets you another 5 degrees closer to the wind with no loss in speed.
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post #5 of 12 Old 09-09-2009
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Good advise so far.

One question: Are you moving your jib cars forward after you have furled the genoa to reduce sail area? If not, give it a try.

Jack

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post #6 of 12 Old 09-09-2009 Thread Starter
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I don't have enough experience to know how to tell when a sail is "blown out" but my mainsail isn't too bad, I have no idea how old but looks good. I can get the main to set pretty flat even when reefed. The Genoa on the other hand has seen better days, had to patch it up a little this year and I would guess it's blown out to a degree.

Sailingfool you mention inboard jib track ... sounds like a good idea. Even in lighter winds I cannot get the genoa to work as close to the wind as my mainsail.

I would like to try a working jib.

1980 S2 9.2A (30') in Anacortes, WA
Aux power 13hp Volvo MD7A
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
Good advise so far.

One question: Are you moving your jib cars forward after you have furled the genoa to reduce sail area? If not, give it a try.

Jack
I usually just leave the sheet blocks where they are, because they are shackled to the toerail ... genoa is probably out of trim a bit after reefing but moving the blocks isn't that easy. Could be done though and I'll try this, I should make marks on the toerail I suppose for where the blocks should go when the genoa is reefed to make this easier.

The idea being I guess to have the sheet put even pressure on top & bottom of sail?

1980 S2 9.2A (30') in Anacortes, WA
Aux power 13hp Volvo MD7A

Last edited by FishFinder; 09-09-2009 at 08:41 PM.
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post #8 of 12 Old 09-09-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FishFinder View Post
I usually just leave the sheet blocks where they are, because they are shackled to the toerail ... genoa is probably out of trim a bit after reefing but moving the blocks isn't that easy. Could be done though and I'll try this, I should make marks on the toerail I suppose for where the blocks should go when the genoa is reefed to make this easier.

The idea being I guess to have the sheet put even pressure on top & bottom of sail?
The leech and foot should have a similar shape.

You might try using snatch blocks on the toerail. You could either move them if they on on snap shackles, or have two sets on each side. I would favour the former solution. You should moving the jib lead forwatdas you go further down wind and aft as you go upwind. That provides the proper twist in the leech.

Jack

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post #9 of 12 Old 09-13-2009
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I agree, moving the jib sheet blocks forward when reefing is very important to keep the foot and leach at proper tention to prevent luffing of the upper portion of the leach. This is probably obvious, but change the blocks on the leeward side while not under tension, then tack and change the other side. It's much easier and safer even when you have a sliding block car like I do on my Catalina 350.

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post #10 of 12 Old 09-14-2009
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Do you not have a genoa track along side your cabin sides ? I have a 9.1 but and that is all we use. I am not familair with the 9.2 but i would think they have an inboard track already.

I would second the suggestion that you need a true 100 % jib and change down to it when conditions warrant.
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