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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #1  
Old 10-23-2009
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Stories of towing hard tenders in high seas

I've seen and heard a lot of different opinions about towing tenders and safety at sea. I curious to know what stories folks have both about successes and failures out there, particularly when it counts, in high seas.

Looking forward to some interesting stories,

Colin
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Old 10-23-2009
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I've only ever towed a hard dinghy e few times, until I found out it costs a knot or two. Besides that there's too many that have lost/capsized/swamped their dinghy when towing it.
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Old 10-23-2009
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I cant be of any help to you because we basically never tow any more. You have to keep an eye on the dinghy and the painter.

We lift the dinghy up even overnight in a quiet anchorage. Always ready to lift anchor and go as experience has taught us over an over.

On any passage - the dinghy will not be on davits - it will be on deck (upside down of course). Most davits also house solar panels, wind gens and/or radar. They are around the backstay. Anything that can rip the whole structure off - eg1-2 tonnes of water in a dinghy can seriously affect your day.

Towing means you will have to run the dinghy at a wavelength away - You wont see the dinghy at night - only the tension and release on the painter. You can lose the dinghy. Do you take the outboard off? - if so why not bring up the dinghy as well.

I am too 'delicate' to add any stressers to my life.
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Old 10-23-2009
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We have been using a hard dingy for a few years in the Puget Sound area, and tow it on a regular bases. I do not have any great stories to tell as we have not lost, swamped, capsized it, or got the painter in the prop yet, but it does cost a knot or two, as mentioned earlier. Often we are just sailing a few hours to another state park or Island, so the cost of towing is negligible. However, on days when we really want to make some distance, or in rough weather or potential for bigger waves such as crossing the strait of Juan De Fuca, we will put it up on deck.

We used to have a very heavy little guy, which required a lifting bridle and using the the spinnaker pole, halyards and winches to get it up, and it was still rather difficult. Last winter we built an 11 foot nesting dingy, so we can lift each half separately and nest the on deck so it is only about 6 feet long. This has worked great, and we can easily lift each half of the dingy from the water to the deck without any lifting aids. I find we put it on deck far more often as it only takes 10 minutes or so, rather then the 30 or so it did before, and a lot less stress and potential to get hurt. It will be even easier once I add a gate in the foredeck lifelines, so we do not have to go over the top.


We also do not have an out board for it at this point, rowing only, so lifting the outboard is not an issue.
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Old 10-23-2009
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Stories of towing hard tenders in high seas ....

usually don't turn out well.
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Old 10-26-2009
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my hard one tows well,no horror stories .with towing u always need situational awareness..as for the 1 or 2 knot drag if u r at hull speed or above there may be no neg drag becuz y r at hull speed
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