MOB Video - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
 Not a Member? 

Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 01-14-2010
smackdaddy's Avatar
Last Man Standing
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 13,129
Thanks: 84
Thanked 78 Times in 72 Posts
Rep Power: 9
smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough
As I mentioned in another thread, I've been watching the "Annapolis Book of Seamanship" DVD series and I just finished watching the demonstration of the Lifesling.

How many of you have actually deployed and used it? I was AMAZED at how "complicated" it was and how long it took to get the dude out of the water.

In the video, it was a crew of 2. One goes over, the remaining crew tosses in the Lifesling - then starts to work...

1. Quickstop
2. Sails back to the MOB and circles to let him grab the LS.
3. Once the MOB is in the LS, the crew drops the main and releases the halyard shackle from the main (actually unscrews the pin)
4. The crew then rigs a fairly complicated looking block system to the rail (couldn't quite get all the detail on the first viewing).
5. The crew then somehow feeds the LS line into this system and then uses the halyard to SLOWLY haul the dude out.

The thing I liked about the video was that they seemed careful to show the actual time required for the process instead of editing through it to make it seem fast. But I was amazed at the complexity and length of time it all took. It was FAR faster dropping the MOB a swim ladder (they also showed this technique)

I learned 3 things:

-I need to practice actual MOB far more than I have.
-If the MOB was unconscious when they went over in the filmed scenario, he was dead anyway because he didn't appear to be wearing a pfd and couldn't have gotten to the LS without another crew member going after him.
-If the water was cold it would have been a lost cause. And if the MOB was unconscious, it would have been 2 lives lost if another crew member had gone in and spent the time in the water required by 2 rescues with the LS.

Can you just attached the halyard directly to the LS collar and hoist them out? Why the need for the additional block system?
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40

Last edited by smackdaddy; 01-14-2010 at 12:11 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 01-14-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 536
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Architeuthis is on a distinguished road
Sail with a dog.

Ours jumped over often enough to train us well. We no longer have that dog, turns out you have to get the rescue right every time (just kidding) so do not have the practice we should have.

Next sail a cushion is getting wet.
__________________
Have faith that the oceans are going to rise and flood the world, that plague and pestilence brought on by Climate Change is going to punish us for not believing. Please do as they say it is our only hope. :P
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 01-14-2010
smackdaddy's Avatar
Last Man Standing
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 13,129
Thanks: 84
Thanked 78 Times in 72 Posts
Rep Power: 9
smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough
Yeah Arch - it's always that one lousy rescue that gets 'em.

I went back and watched it again and they did say that you can use the halyard directly on the the LS. It appears the block/tackle was just to help with the load - but sure seemed to take extra time (and would be something you'd have to have handy just for that purpose).

Here's another video I found that use the spin halyard directly, and has some good tips. Bottom line, you need a conscious COB - or you need more than one in the water...

__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 01-15-2010
braidmike's Avatar
SV Déjàlà
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Mayne Island, BC & Long Beach, CA
Posts: 80
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
braidmike is on a distinguished road
Thanks for the link, Smack. Practical sailor has had a few tests of different styles of MOB gear and tested some different techniques in the last few months. The result of all this is an adjustment of our personal practices on the boat. Because its just the two of us, the MOB scenario does not seem to have a great chance of a successful outcome. I am re-rigging the jack-line/clip-in points to insure clip in happens BEFORE leaving belowdecks.

My question: In the industrial construction world, safety harnesses are a daily fact of life, and the design is 'almost' stupidproof. The harnesses (basically just a couple D rings on a vest) for boating seem laughable in comparison. Has anyone seen a harness designed for boating that is more substantial, but still designed to be more comfortable than industrial models?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 01-15-2010
smackdaddy's Avatar
Last Man Standing
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 13,129
Thanks: 84
Thanked 78 Times in 72 Posts
Rep Power: 9
smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough
braid - totally agreed on the staying on the boat in the first place. You really begin to realize how slim your chances are if you go over in rough conditions and/or cold water.

The "Annapolis Book of Seamanship" video demonstration showed a woman getting the man back aboard with the Lifesling. So it's definitely doable.

I'm going to be purchasing a couple of the pfds with the integrated harness. Trying to take out as much redundancy as possible. Even so, it's essentially the same set up as you mentioned above. I've not seen any monster harnesses. Maybe someone else has.

Another thing I noticed in the DVD series was that John had rigged a simple jackline - but his tether was long enough that he would definitely have gone over the side. I've heard a lot of people recommend a long and a short tether for that reason.

It's great stuff to learn.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40

Last edited by smackdaddy; 01-15-2010 at 12:54 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 01-15-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Three Mile Harbor, East Hampton, NY
Posts: 463
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 8
tweitz is on a distinguished road
It was not clear from the video, but one of the big issues is just finding the COB, especially in rough seas. The moment he went over there was a lot of yelling, but with a large crew, someone should have immediately been designated by the captain (or helmsman if the captain is below) with the sole job of pointing at the COB. In my view they should also have thrown several pieces of flotation to the COB, both for him to swim to, if he can, and to help find his general location if they lose sight of him. I always keep a few of those floating cushions in the cockpit for just that purpose and instruct the crew to toss them immediately at a COB. The video also shows how false is the sense of security ithat lifelines give us.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 01-15-2010
canadianseamonkey's Avatar
Caribbean Surveyor
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Now in Sosua, DR
Posts: 511
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
canadianseamonkey is on a distinguished road
What I noticed the most was how well you could see the MOB in the water. He was wearing that bright yellow cap and a red suit. Not sure about in the US, but here in Canada they sell blue pfd's which you can't see in the water. Those pfd's are not allowed on my boat for obvious reasons.

Good find Smack! as you would say +1
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 01-15-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,930
Thanks: 4
Thanked 34 Times in 34 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Tempest is on a distinguished road
I'm curious....everyone on the boat was in full foul weather gear...and there was a guy topside in shorts and sneakers with the camera?...

Anywho, One mistake that I saw...was that they held onto the line for the horseshoe..type IV .....the MOB is not a fish..you don't reel him in...
You throw the type IV AND the line....the line floats..So the theory is that if the Horseshoe misses...the line will float by and the MOB can reel it in or swim a little way to retrieve the line...and then reel the type IV and stay afloat until the boat comes back.

The 1st mistake, of course, was unclipping..before he was safely into the companionway...which by the way was wide open..? maybe for the shift change?

2nd mistake was, the golden rule...one hand for you, one for the boat...
he was standing there with both hands free..

yeah, I know, I wasn't there...but this is pretty basic seamanship stuff...
taught in sailing 101...

So going back to the guy in shorts with a camera...this seems like they forgot where they were for a minute..in a moment of relaxation....
__________________
Tempest
Sabre 34
Morgan, NJ

Last edited by Tempest; 01-15-2010 at 09:04 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 01-15-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,930
Thanks: 4
Thanked 34 Times in 34 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Tempest is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by tweitz View Post
It was not clear from the video, but one of the big issues is just finding the COB, especially in rough seas. The moment he went over there was a lot of yelling, but with a large crew, someone should have immediately been designated by the captain (or helmsman if the captain is below) with the sole job of pointing at the COB. In my view they should also have thrown several pieces of flotation to the COB, both for him to swim to, if he can, and to help find his general location if they lose sight of him. I always keep a few of those floating cushions in the cockpit for just that purpose and instruct the crew to toss them immediately at a COB. The video also shows how false is the sense of security ithat lifelines give us.

Exactly!!... Throw everything that floats...!...that's what I teach.

Your, Shipmate...friend, loved one, goes in the water...and they only get ONE floatation device???.....too funny!! and then when you miss...you reel it back??...

Throw everything that floats...toward the MOB...
__________________
Tempest
Sabre 34
Morgan, NJ
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 01-19-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: London
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
mattny08 is on a distinguished road
17 minutes isn't terrible, but not record setting. It did take 3 passes however which accounts for most of the time. I think they had 2 reefs and a number 2 or 3 headsail and staysail. The seas were pretty rough - the camera never quite catches the true nature of the seas, but not terrible. The reason for multiple passes was due to the difficulty in getting the helicopter strap over the COB with an inflated life jacket. The SOP for COB is for one crew member with a climbing harness (which someone wears at all times) to go over the side on a halyard to recover the victim using a helicopter strap. After two unsuccessful attempts, they opted to just get one of the yankee sheets tied on him instead.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Crew wanted US to Europe/Germany Julian on Cruise Crew Wanted/Available 12 03-15-2011 07:52 PM
Which pocket cruiser is best for me ? dpcolohan Boat Review and Purchase Forum 31 03-02-2008 05:21 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:49 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.