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davidpm 12-20-2009 08:59 PM

Rules of the Road (Quiz)
 
For those of us land-bound by 2 feet of snow maybe you are up to some ROR challenges. I just finished "Farwell's Rules of the Nautical Road" over 600 pages and my eyes are still bleeding.
It is the definitive work on the ROR and their legal interpretation.

So as a disclaimer I know the answer. Those of you who have the book may want to wait a little to get some dumb answers from others. We can make fun of them in fine sailnet fashion.:)

So for the first question in multiple parts:
  • Are the COLREGS rules or regulations?
  • What is the difference?
  • How does this difference have a practical effect on the behavior of a skipper?
If you don't have the book go ahead and guess, I dare you.
Note to self Page 36

Tempest 12-20-2009 09:33 PM

Ok...I'll be the Guinea Pig..and take a stab at it.....

They are international regulations....with underlying rules that are universal..

local authorities can create additional rules but they cannot be in direct conflict with the basic Colregs regulations

Inland vs International rules...Western Rivers..even racing rules..might be examples of local authorities

A skipper needs to know the nuances based upon the waters they are operating in.

Feel free...to make fun!...but there will be "NO Soup for you"

wind_magic 12-20-2009 09:40 PM

I have no idea, but I will take some guesses. :)

Quote:

Originally Posted by davidpm (Post 552797)
  • Are the COLREGS rules or regulations?
  • What is the difference?
  • How does this difference have a practical effect on the behavior of a skipper?

Since COLREGS has "REGS" in it, I will guess it is regulations and not rules ?

What is the difference ? Hmm. I don't have any idea. Must be a legal difference of some kind!

What practical effect ? Must be some kind of a legal effect! :) Probably one that means it is all your fault. :D

JohnRPollard 12-21-2009 07:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by davidpm (Post 552797)
[*]Are the COLREGS rules or regulations?


Aren't they the same as the Pirates' Code, "more like guidelines"?

:D :D :D

Boasun 12-21-2009 10:27 AM

There are those out there Who ignore the Regulations, and yes they are laws, because they "know what they are doing". And generally cause chaos on the waters.
Inland Rules of the Road, Are Law you will find them in the Code of Federal Regulations 33.
ColRegs are International law, under the treaties signed by all of the Maritime nations. And the USA and all the other nations have signed and ratified those treaties. The USA is a signatory nation of IMO.
Any Questions?

jackdale 12-21-2009 11:29 AM

In Canada, Colregs are a part of the Canada Shipping Act. Most of our laws have accompanying regulations. Also rather than having a separate set of "Inland" rules, there are Canadian "modifications" written into the rules.

smackdaddy 12-21-2009 11:32 AM

Wait - none of this can possibly apply. We aren't on a "road" silly. We're sailors!

I say just throw the whole thing out and start over.

AE28 12-21-2009 11:34 AM

What's the difference, since they're all superseded by The Prime Directive!
Paul

PalmettoSailor 12-21-2009 12:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AE28 (Post 552940)
What's the difference, since they're all superseded by The Prime Directive!
Paul

"Futility is resistant, your ass will be laminated!"

Yamsailor 12-21-2009 03:52 PM

OK--I have used Farwell's Rules of the Nautical Road and have actually written an article referencing the book. I have enclosed a link to the article at the end of this response.

In the maritime context:

1) A regulation describes the specific and exact required conduct a vessel should employ when a "Risk of Collision" exists;

2) In contrast, Rules prescribe the proper conduct, but not the specific action, a vessel should take in order to avoid a collision;

3) The difference reflects is: A Regulation requires obtaining the prescribed situational outcome to avoid a specific situation and a Rule provides the broad behavior on how to accomplish the regulatory requirement.

I wrote this article a couple of years ago:

CoastalBoating.net, Risk of collision for the recreational boater, Captain Andrew Seligman, Colregs, collisions at sea, international regulations,


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