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post #11 of 26 Old 01-26-2010
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Neither a J-22 nor a Sonar 23 really need the jib to tack quickly, and if it is the less experienced person left on board, that's one less sail that needs tending.

We never had a bit of a problem performing the maneuver, though I will agree that in a larger and heavier boat you'd probably want to keep the jib in play until the tack.

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post #12 of 26 Old 01-26-2010
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A big problem with the luffing jib, as you approach and grab "Oscar" in a breeze, is getting beat to death by the sheets, or the jib clew. The heave-to method would obviate this, and so would the "quick-stop" method taught by the RORC, which directs that the jib be lowered or furled before rounding back up to get Oscar.
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post #13 of 26 Old 01-26-2010
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Nolatom,

Not a bad idea.. with a crew to furl the roller furling, or go forward to lower and secure the jib....but if the only other person onboard...is in the water, I'd opt for the flogging jib. The sheets can be secured from the cockpit...it's not the time to multi-task..task imo

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post #14 of 26 Old 01-26-2010 Thread Starter
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The instructor I had taught the following steps:

1. Holler
2. Point
3. Throw
4. Fall off or come up to close reach, or beam reach. When close hauled he said close reach as everyone usually fell off to a beam reach anyway.
5. Sail 3 to four boat lengths
6. Tack but do not touch the jib leave it backwinded.
7. Drive the boat towards the MOB keeping him just to leward.
8. As soon as he is at the bow turn hard to windward putting the boat into a hove too position and swinging the stern right up to the MOB.

It worked great for him about a dozen times.
No flogging jib but you don't have a lot of time to grab your guy.
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post #15 of 26 Old 01-27-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
6. Tack but do not touch the jib leave it backwinded.
7. Drive the boat towards the MOB keeping him just to leward.
8. As soon as he is at the bow turn hard to windward putting the boat into a hove too position and swinging the stern right up to the MOB.
On a really windy day, I can see the jib filling up as you turn into the wind, tacking (against your will), and then sailing away from your MOB.

Last edited by legarots; 01-27-2010 at 06:49 PM.
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post #16 of 26 Old 01-27-2010
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What would be a good drill for the total non-sailor who might have to come get US? My family sails with me maybe three times a year if I'm lucky, so getting them drilled on boat handling enough to come after me under sail is out of the question.

However, I could teach them how to turn into the wind, dump all the sails and start the engine and come get me -- that's simple enough for anyone, I'd say. But thinking about it brings up the scenario of having to turn the boat through the wind in such a way that even luffing sails could catch the wind and crash gybe, or other such unpleasantries.

So, what would be a good under-engine drill to practice for the lubbers on board? Let go the sheets, come into the wind, drop the main and jib as quick'n'dirty as possible, then come to the MOB under power? I have a downhaul on my jib, so at least no one would have to go further forward than the mast to release the halyards, but the main makes a frightful clutter when dropped in an uncontrolled manner, and might get in the way enough to cause a real problem steering the boat.

Obviously having all lines led to the cockpit for quick halyard release, lazy jacks and a downhaul on the jib would make life a lot easier, but without those things, what would be a good procedure?

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post #17 of 26 Old 01-27-2010 Thread Starter
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The following is the rough sketch my instructor drew.
It's a little hard to read but:
Position 1 at bottom right boat close hauled (overboard at port stern)
Falls off to close reach position 2 and sails 3 boat lengths.
Position 3 to 4 tack and leave jib in hove to position (Text says: Heave to with sail)
Text at top says: (Rudder is not in the hove to position, drive boat to MOB)
Position 5, when bow is at MOB on leeward side turn boat into wind putting helm in hove to position with MOB against the leeward side of the boat.
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Last edited by davidpm; 01-27-2010 at 08:18 PM.
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post #18 of 26 Old 01-27-2010 Thread Starter
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Quote:
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Obviously having all lines led to the cockpit for quick halyard release, lazy jacks and a downhaul on the jib would make life a lot easier, but without those things, what would be a good procedure?
My instructor admitted that turning on the engine and driving to the MOB was a likely the most useful way to recover. He recommended turning off the engine before the final approach.
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post #19 of 26 Old 01-28-2010
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The two of us took the ASA courses last month in the VIs. We were going through about our fourth MOB drill when I realized it just wasn't going to work for us. Just two of us, and with one of us overboard...well....the instructor agreed that in our case a quick heave to was probably simplest. Especially if we forgot everything else in sequence and just wanted to stop the boat.

I asked him at what point do I just dump that dinghy in the water and go get her? He said NEVER leave the boat. And normally I wouldn't. But if I screwed up and was downwind drifting away from the person in the water, and couldn't get the main engine started for whatever reason, I suspect I would launch the dinghy rather than continue to try to figure out how to start sailing again..

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post #20 of 26 Old 01-28-2010
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least maneuvers

I am inexperienced and I need to study more and practice more but some of the instruction I have had in the distant past involved no changes of sails or sheets. It is my opinion that if I am the only one on board or only one of two, I do not want to be doing sail or sheet work. I would be worried about loosing sight of the MOB. Interested in other thoughts!
Remember, I have more book knowledge than experience.
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