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post #1 of 26 Old 01-24-2010 Thread Starter
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Hove To COB Procedure

I just got back from taking my ASA 101, 103, 104 in Santa Barbara.
Don't ask about the weather.

The 103,104 teacher taught a type of Crew over board recovery not mentioned in the Practical Sailor Jan 2010 issue.

He taught falling off to a close reach/ beam reach for 3-4 boat lengths then heaving to and drifting down to the COB.

Seemed to work pretty well.

What do you think?
I would be interested in what the ASA instructors on this forum think too?
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post #2 of 26 Old 01-24-2010
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Hi David

In the International Sail and Power Association, we use a heave-to, sail-to, heave-to method for upwind COB.

1) heave-to; you may actually drift back to the COB - as in your scenario

(DO NOT TOUCH THE SHEETS)

2) sail-to;
  1. on a beam reach until the COB is a beam.
  2. sail dead down wind (with sails sheeted in) until the COB is off the quarter
  3. gybe and head up onto a close-haul / close reach staying about 2 boats out until COB is off the quarter
3) heave-to and drift back to the MOB

This can be done by one person; there a a lot of sailing couples out there.
You never lose sight of the COB.
Being hove-to with COB on leeward side, the boat heels toward to the COB.
In heavy air - chicken gybe.
You do not have to touch the sails.
There are no flogging sails.
The life sling works well with this method.

It does vary from boat to boat.

PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE.

Jack

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post #3 of 26 Old 01-24-2010
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Hi David,

If you're sailing downwind, when the crew goes over you'd have to come back upwind.. to retrieve the COB. So, the goal would be to come alongside.
Not sail past the COB. and drift back...

So heaving-to would only be an upwind maneuver.


My vessel tends to sail about 1-2 knots from a hove-to position. Although, there is more leeway, so I guess you could drift down back to the COB.
It sounds like it worked when you did it in training

And, I don't generally heave-to unless I furl my genoa to the point where it's clear of the mast and the stays....so, I'd have to see how it behaves with a full genoa..backed.

Drifting down to the COB would also be a judgement call, based on the sea state and the speed of drift. I wouldn't want to get there, only to smack them with the boat. Likewise, you wouldn't want the waves, if large to be tossing the COB against the boat...so to me conditions...sail configuration play a decisive role in how you approach a COB.

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post #4 of 26 Old 01-24-2010
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Tempest

Even on a downwind COB I end up hove-to.

Give yourself some distance (I count to 8 or 10) and then come about, and come back on a close reach / close haul. You do have to sheet in.

Once the COB is on the quarter, heave-to and drift back.

This is actually faster than an upwind COB.

Depending on the boat, you may have to ease one sail.

With practice, this can be done single-handed.

As to hitting the COB with the boat on the leeward; in my experience the water being pushed by the hull tends to keep the COB (or in practice, the fender) from the boat. This was a real hassle when we lost a TV antennae dome off a boat off Cape Scott. We got back fine, but the water keep pushing the dome away from the boat. We did eventually retrieve it.

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Last edited by jackdale; 01-24-2010 at 01:41 PM.
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post #5 of 26 Old 01-24-2010
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Jack,

I'll play around with it. Spring can't come soon enough for me!

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post #6 of 26 Old 01-25-2010
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Do you keep the main sheeted in (or ease it out) on your final heave-to?
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post #7 of 26 Old 01-25-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by legarots View Post
Do you keep the main sheeted in (or ease it out) on your final heave-to?
Depends on the boat. Most modern fin keel boats seem to need the main sheeted in. On some boats with large genoas, you may to ease it.

Experiment by heaving-to and and see what adjustments may be needed. Then practice a COB or 12.

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post #8 of 26 Old 01-25-2010
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FWIW, here's what I was taught in my US Sailing small boat class (this is just the boat handling part):

Immediately release the jib and come up onto a beam reach under main only.

Sail until 3-4 boat lengths away.

Tack and head back toward the COB on the opposite broad reach.

Approach on a close reach, easing the main sheet to control speed.

My instructors called this "approaching from the safety position." The idea was that you could luff the main to reduce speed or pull it back in slightly to power up. We were doing this maneuver in J-22s and Sonar 23s.

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post #9 of 26 Old 01-25-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaschrumpf View Post
FWIW, here's what I was taught in my US Sailing small boat class (this is just the boat handling part):

Immediately release the jib and come up onto a beam reach under main only.

Sail until 3-4 boat lengths away.

Tack and head back toward the COB on the opposite broad reach.

Approach on a close reach, easing the main sheet to control speed.

My instructors called this "approaching from the safety position." The idea was that you could luff the main to reduce speed or pull it back in slightly to power up. We were doing this maneuver in J-22s and Sonar 23s.

Jas.

ASA teaches basically the same manuever, except you don't release the Jib until you tack.

You don't want to tack without the jib and you want to get headed back to the COB as quickly as possible.

Once you are on the new tack, then you release the Jib and then proceed as you stated above

Also, the idea is to get downwind of the COB so if you are down wind after your tack..and can sail directly to them on a close reach, or a beam...then do so....

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post #10 of 26 Old 01-25-2010
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I again agree with Tempest, as I did on another thread. If your plan is based on tacking and you are on main alone, there is a good chance you will end up in irons and find yourself well downwind of the COB. This is especially true if it is the less experienced member of the couple still on board.
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