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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #11  
Old 04-13-2010
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First of all you put the tiller between your knees, bring the main sheet in and the traveller up near centre, take up the slack in the lazy sheet.

You now have one sheet in each hand so you wear ship with your knees releasing the old sheet and pulling in the new sheet. The main will come across and you ease the main sheet then adjust the traveller.

The hard part on my boat as I do not have a tiller pilot is getting a cold beer from down below once on the new course.
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  #12  
Old 04-14-2010
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Oh Joy is too big to reach the winches with the tiller between your knees. You just have to be quick about it or use your butt or knees to steer while ya work.
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  #13  
Old 04-14-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieCobra View Post
When the breeze is up and I'm gybing single or short handed, I shorten the mainsheet, harden up the lazy sheet, throw all but enough wraps to keep the working sheet in place on the winch and gybe. As she's coming through and the jib backs, I throw off the wraps and let her run. Just after she comes through the wind I trim as much of the jib by hand as I can. Once on the new course, I sheet out a bit on the main and trim the jib. My traveller is 24" long and has no adjustments. It free slides to the stops. If it had adjustments, I'd move it from out to center and then out on the new side after the gybe. Oh Joy is a tiller boat so doing this dance requires a bit of dexterity, especially in anything over 30 knots.
Jibing in 30 knots or above is a religious experience. Charlie, you and OH JOY, with long keel, large rudder and good displacement (and courage, skill and experience) can do this and live to tell about it, but a lot of us in smaller, lighter, narrow-keel (and rig) profile, quick-pivot boats, won't track well enough to do it without overpowering the helm after the boom comes across, and getting involuntarily rounded up into a broach that's hard to recover from in a stinking breeze.

So for those in the latter category, and especially those with thin enough experience to be writing to the "Learn to Sail" topic, take Charlie's good advice as to how to do it, but then sail 30 years before trying it in 30+ knots. For the rest of us, above 20-25 knots, consider the "chicken jibe", or a storm trysail, or just a jib, that can be "worn" across without jibing a long heavy boom.

And letting the mainsheet out real quick on the lighter boats is imperative to get the main out to perpendicular with the wind, *fast*. This reduces the twisting force you get (in a lightweight boat) if you keep it sheeted in too long, and makes it easier to hold her to a broad reach or broader right after the jibe, since the rudder is resisting less force trying to round the boat up.
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Old 04-14-2010
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Hilarious thread! From 'how to gybe my Bene 31 short handed' to the perils of heavy air gybing in 30+ kts of breeze, or, gybing on "11".

To the OP, you're boat isn't all too big, so there really isn't too much to worry about. The order (main first, jib second or visa versa) isn't all that important for normal conditions. We'll leave the heavy stuff for another thread as it depends hugely on the boat, crew, and very importantly, sea state.

In your case, it shouldn't be hard or slow to go wing on wing for a bit, then gybe the main. Or as others said, strap your jib a bit, take up on the lazy sheet, gybe the boat and the main, and deal with the jib when your done and trim to course. In really light air, you can just grab a bite of the mainsheet and toss it across the boat as the stern crosses the wind. Be sure it's a controlled ease on the new gybe. It saves a lot of wear and tear. In more wind, use the main sheet to bring the boom to centerline... when the main is effectively stalled just before it's ready to fill on the new gybe, uncleat the main sheet for a quick and controlled ease. On larger boats with main sheet winches, use the winch drum to control the speed of the ease. 'Quick' is your friend, but 'control' is your god. If you have and use your vang, be aware of how much vang tension you might have. If it's heavily tensioned and you let the boom slam across the boat, you can break the boom even when you start sailing in the 18-20kt wind range.

In the end, gybing single handed is a pretty simple sequence. Just practice.
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Several people have mentioned winching in the mainsheet, then quickly letting it out on the other tack as the stern comes through the wind.

Why is it okay to winch in the mainsheet at your leisure before the gybe, if it's so important to let it out quickly on the other? Do you not risk a pre-gybe broach if you spend too much time with the main close to center prior to the turn?
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Old 04-14-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bacampbe View Post
Several people have mentioned winching in the mainsheet, then quickly letting it out on the other tack as the stern comes through the wind.

Why is it okay to winch in the mainsheet at your leisure before the gybe, if it's so important to let it out quickly on the other? Do you not risk a pre-gybe broach if you spend too much time with the main close to center prior to the turn?
Not so much, since you are bearing off while you are trimming in the main, which tends to keep the CE and the CLR more or less in line, and neither the main nor the rudder are being shock-loaded. It's different after the boom slams over, it quickly goes from pushing you one way to pushing you the other way. No matter what the theory, the dicey part of the jibe is just after you do it, not just before.
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Old 04-14-2010
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If you're doing this properly, bringing the main sail to center line helps prevent it from gybing unintentionally and slamming across the boat. The boom in sucha gybe is lethal and can severely injure or kill people if they are hit by it.

You should be bringing the mainsail in as the boat is turning, and then releasing it as the boat's stern comes through the eye of the wind.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bacampbe View Post
Several people have mentioned winching in the mainsheet, then quickly letting it out on the other tack as the stern comes through the wind.

Why is it okay to winch in the mainsheet at your leisure before the gybe, if it's so important to let it out quickly on the other? Do you not risk a pre-gybe broach if you spend too much time with the main close to center prior to the turn?
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  #18  
Old 04-14-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bacampbe View Post
Why is it okay to winch in the mainsheet at your leisure before the gybe, if it's so important to let it out quickly on the other? Do you not risk a pre-gybe broach if you spend too much time with the main close to center prior to the turn?
I think this has been well answered by SD and nolatom, but I'll add that a gybe cannot occur unless the wind becomes parallel to the length of the boom. It's a frequent occurrence that new sailors (particularly those who have taken the beginner's courses) are often scared so silly by their instructors about accidentally jibing when on a run that they forget (or don't realize or aren't taught) that if the boom is all the way out (say 70 degrees), you still have to turn 70 more degrees before a jibe can occur.

When you're sheeting in, as long as you're not by the lee, not in steep following seas or on a dead run, sheeting in is a very safe part of the maneuver.

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  #19  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
You should be bringing the mainsail in as the boat is turning, and then releasing it as the boat's stern comes through the eye of the wind.
Right--that's why I was talking about single or short handled gybes. That is, what's the best procedure when you can only do one thing at a time. So, doing all that single handed (and ignoring the jib for a moment), we're talking about bearing off, sheeting in the main, gybing, then running up and easing the main, running back to the wheel to arrest the turn, etc.

Chicken gybes are sounding better and better, at least when there's too much wind to just throw the boom over by hand.

I do have an autopilot, but I don't think I can trust it to steer to a new course and hold it under gybing conditions. (It does a pretty good job of autotacking, but it seems to get confused by the boat response during a gybe)
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Old 04-14-2010
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Not a typo - 22 ft boom, 83 ft mast - 60 ft boat. See avitar.
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