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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #41  
Old 06-10-2010
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[QUOTE, did several trips to Monterey and several from Santa Barbara out to the Channel Islands as well as many seasons of SYRA racing.[/QUOTE]

Several trips from SF to Monterey (and back?) in a 22' Catalina???
Yo Da Man!!!
An experienced couple just died sailing a 33' Ranger from Half Moon bay to SF (1/3 the distance), in unpredicted 30-40 plus Knot winds! The boat survived (fully reefed).

Last edited by L124C; 06-10-2010 at 03:31 AM.
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  #42  
Old 06-10-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L124C View Post
[QUOTE, did several trips to Monterey and several from Santa Barbara out to the Channel Islands as well as many seasons of SYRA racing.
Several trips from SF to Monterey (and back ?) in a 22' Catalina???
Yo Da Man!!!
An experienced couple just died sailing a 33' Ranger from Half Moon bay to SF! The boat survived.[/QUOTE]

G'Day Mate,

Nope, only the downwind direction (to Monterey). That's what a trailer boat is good for, after all! And we did it in favorable wx conditions too. Don't know what happened to those folks in the Ranger, glad that it never got that bad with me.

Cheers,

Jim
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  #43  
Old 06-10-2010
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A Cal 20 sailed the Singlehanded TransPac (SF to Hawaii) last year...

Correction on that Ranger 33; I think heavy winds were predicted; it was rough for several days out there. I have a feeling that they thought it was not as bad as predicted; then it got a bit worse than predicted and they had nowhere to go but to try and cross the SF Bar.
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Old 06-10-2010
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Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
Cool. Thanks.

The reason I ask is that my TL is rigged with blocks, etc. that makes it look like it's super adjustable. And this didn't make a lot of sense to me unless it was to be used for trimming.

Oh, you have the cocktail rigging...on your topping lift. That's For raising the boom, while sitting in the cockpit..having cocktails and watching the sunset....so you don't bump your head when you get up for another drink!
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  #45  
Old 06-10-2010
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Great story and very timely. I was out on my boat an Ericson 29 this past Sunday and had a similar situation. Since then I have been endlessly going over what I did and should have done and have learned a lot from the experience. Scary experience but very valuable.

Two friends and I went out on a day forecast to be rainy with a Small Craft Advisory. We decided to head out the channel to see what conditions were really like and decide based on that. Got out the channel and conditions were fine, rain but mild winds so we decided to go sailing. For about an hour or 2 we tacked around never going too far out. We started to hear some thunder in the distance so decided to make our way back in. With the rain and clouds could not really see any different weather coming as visibility was poor. As we are headed back in with full sail we get slammed with a squall coming from the opposite direction of where the winds were coming from! Within moments we changed from running under light winds to strong winds and very heavy rain on our nose. Sails were flapping like crazy and boat layed right down on her port side. Fired up the diesel and struggled to get the jib rolled up which took great effort. Wrestled the main down which greatly reduced the heeling and got the jib rolled up. Once the sails were down things got much better and of course the storm passed. Now we just had to figure out where we were and make our way back in.

Lessons learned were listen to weather radio, this may have given us some warning of this strong system coming through. When I hear thunder in the distance but can't see well I will reduce sail. I am kicking myself for thinking about rolling up the jib because it wasn't doing much anyway and didn't for some reason. If I even think about reducing sail in the future I will.

I also have to just know what the correct heading is to head back up the channel. The system had cleared enough that we could see so thought we knew where we were and where to head but misread the channel and bumped bottom a little. The GPS was on the whole time but I found a small screen with water drops all over it can be hard to read. Figured out where we were and got back in safely. If I had known the correct heading once I reached the outer channel marker we would have been fine.

Tough learning the lessons during the exam but I will NOT forget.
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  #46  
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Originally Posted by alanr77 View Post
(Cockpit lockers are water tight and secured, additional drains have been installed in the cockpit and I had put the companionway boards in earlier so they were draining quickly and to me posed no real threat).
IMHO, this was the most important action that you took. I see very experienced sailors who neglect to secure the hatches and install the hatchboards when the going gets rough, and it is very common to see people who don't think to secure the hatches to cockpit lockers. In the severest conditions, when waves are breaking over the boat and into the cockpit, if you can keep the water from flooding into the interior of the boat, the boat will retain it's buoyancy. I recently saw a boat that sank immediately when it was knocked down with the hatchboards not in place. Nothing is more important than keeping the boat sealed, like a corked bottle.

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Now, on to my biggest mistake. What I think I should have done is maintain sea room and continue to run as I had control....
I agree. You suggest that you had sea room, so I'd suggest taking down all sails and running downwind under bare poles, with the aid of the outboard motor. If your motor has a long shaft, it shouldn't cavitate significantly when running downwind. I was caught in a severe microburst, and was running parallel to an outboard-powered Cal 25 that used that technique, and he (and I) made it through conditions that sank a much bigger boat in the same storm.

Small sailboats have a surprising capacity to survive, as long as you keep your head about you, keep them buoyant, avoid damaging broaches or capsizes, and stay with the boat.

Last edited by Sailormon6; 06-10-2010 at 08:19 AM.
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Nothing is more important than keeping the boat sealed, like a corked bottle.
Sailormon6 always makes good sense. I think if my boat got knocked down and the hatches weren't closed and sealed I might lose parts that are needed to seal it, and it might be impossible to seal after that. That would be bad.
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  #48  
Old 06-10-2010
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L124C, did you race your Yankee 30 in the double handed lightship this year? If so, that was me in the C34 “Freya” that was on your hip at the windward mark. Nice move, getting a hotter angle by cutting over the Potato Patch. We took the more conservative approach by going down the ship channel which was way too deep for our A-kite. I did manage to do one major roundup in the vicinity of buoys 5&6 however. I did see you in a bit of distress when you did your gybe at Pt. Bonita. (We even had our hand on the mike, ready to call in the Coasties if you didn’t get back up on your feet!)
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  #49  
Old 06-11-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeelHaulin View Post
A Cal 20 sailed the Singlehanded TransPac (SF to Hawaii) last year...Correction on that Ranger 33; I think heavy winds were predicted; it was rough for several days out there. I have a feeling that they thought it was not as bad as predicted; then it got a bit worse than predicted and they had nowhere to go but to try and cross the SF Bar.
How about...Downwind and regroup? I'm confused. Heavy winds were predicted, but then it got worse than predicted? Soooo...they got caught with their pants up?
I beg to differ regarding the forecast, as I clearly state here:
Couple Die Sailing To San Francisco
In fact, I was thinking about going out that Sunday and clearly recall a fairly typical SF, Summer NWS prediction - Small Craft Advisory with winds up to 25 Knots. As I assume you know, in SF that translates into "lets go sailing!".
The archives show that by Noon the wind at SF Beach was at a steady 20 (unusually early), and quickly built to a steady 30 with frequent gusts to 40. The call to the CG from from the Cliff House was sometime around 4PM. So I think the couple knew what they were in for as they left San Mateo and entered SF waters, despite the errant forecast. Anyway, we are going a little off topic here and the other post deals specifically with the incident. See ya there!

Last edited by L124C; 06-11-2010 at 01:55 AM.
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  #50  
Old 06-11-2010
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Originally Posted by GeorgeB View Post
L124C, did you race your Yankee 30 in the double handed lightship this year? If so, that was me in the C34 “Freya” that was on your hip at the windward mark. Nice move, getting a hotter angle by cutting over the Potato Patch. We took the more conservative approach by going down the ship channel which was way too deep for our A-kite. I did manage to do one major roundup in the vicinity of buoys 5&6 however. I did see you in a bit of distress when you did your gybe at Pt. Bonita. (We even had our hand on the mike, ready to call in the Coasties if you didn’t get back up on your feet!)
Nope...wasn't me, but I'll pass the comments on to the Yankee group. With only One Hundred and Thirty something Yankees built, there are only a few of us in the Bay Area. Besides....I don't do "distress"!
Not this week anyway
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