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-   -   Being run down when dead in the water (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/seamanship-navigation/66269-being-run-down-when-dead-water.html)

dabnis 07-07-2010 07:06 PM

Being run down when dead in the water
 
Although not the exact same situation as in Denise's post, from a previous thread "going engineless":


"ED031,
I agree with TOMMAYS. My experience was many years in and outside of San Francisco Bay, LOTS of commercial traffic. Don't know what your area is like, but if there is much ship and barge traffic they will close on you at an alarming rate. A few times I had them get a lot closer than I wanted by the time I got the motor started and finally got some speed up. The ships can be limited to where they can go. For liability purposes they might try full astern
before they run you down. If you lose your wind with commercial traffic around you can be in great danger.
Dabnis"

It is a sad example of what can happen when you are dead in the water
in a sailboat with no power, and no wind .

Dabnis

dabnis 07-07-2010 07:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dabnis (Post 620359)
Although not the exact same situation as in Denise's post, from a previous thread "going engineless":


"ED031,
I agree with TOMMAYS. My experience was many years in and outside of San Francisco Bay, LOTS of commercial traffic. Don't know what your area is like, but if there is much ship and barge traffic they will close on you at an alarming rate. A few times I had them get a lot closer than I wanted by the time I got the motor started and finally got some speed up. The ships can be limited to where they can go. For liability purposes they might try full astern
before they run you down. If you lose your wind with commercial traffic around you can be in great danger.
Dabnis"

It is a sad example of what can happen when you are dead in the water
in a sailboat with no power, and no wind .

Dabnis

Forgot the link:2 Teens Missing, Dozens Rescued After "Duck Boat" Crash In Delaware River - cbs3.com

Dabnis

sailingdog 07-08-2010 12:48 AM

There's a good reason not to sail in the "shipping" channel. In most harbors there are areas of shallower depth that a small sailboat can use, which the larger ships can not. Often there are even designated small craft channels or traffic areas. If you don't have to be in the main shipping channel, why would you sail there???

dabnis 07-08-2010 10:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sailingdog (Post 620439)
There's a good reason not to sail in the "shipping" channel. In most harbors there are areas of shallower depth that a small sailboat can use, which the larger ships can not. Often there are even designated small craft channels or traffic areas. If you don't have to be in the main shipping channel, why would you sail there???

Sometimes it is the only way to get from one place to another.
Agreed, one should spend as little time crossing them as possible.

Dabnis

Boasun 07-08-2010 12:28 PM

When you have to be in a Navigation channel due to ultra shallow water outside the buoys. Then hug either the Green or Red buoy line and let the ships have the center. Also TALK to the pilots on the ship and let them know that you are there... If they are aware of you the lest likely that they will hit you... Which is one minor detail that is very important to you. :)

dabnis 07-08-2010 12:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Boasun (Post 620567)
When you have to be in a Navigation channel due to ultra shallow water outside the buoys. Then hug either the Green or Red buoy line and let the ships have the center. Also TALK to the pilots on the ship and let them know that you are there... If they are aware of you the lest likely that they will hit you... Which is one minor detail that is very important to you. :)

To add a little to this, from an earlier post:

"Just remembered this, many years ago I think I read something to the effect of "smaller vessels shall not impede larger vessels with limited maneuvering capabilities" or something like that. Being enginless with no wind and crossing the shipping lanes may fall into that category? Perhaps JACKDALE can jump in here with the specifics?

Dabnis"

Faster 07-08-2010 12:56 PM

We routinely have to cross a couple of major shipping channels coming and going from Vancouver BC.. container ships, bulk carriers, tankers transit inbound and outbound regularly at at surprising speed most days.

We know folks who have 'stalled' while crossing (engine trouble, no breeze) and they did call the ship, and in another case put out a "pan pan" and the ship was able to deviate around them. So it's important to keep the information channels open too.

Sometimes I feel like a swivel neck keeping an eye out for potential conflicts during the half hour or so it takes to cross these lanes an right angles..

Boasun 07-08-2010 01:21 PM

When you have to be in a Navigation channel due to ultra shallow water outside the buoys. Then hug either the Green or Red buoy line and let the ships have the center. Also TALK to the pilots on the ship and let them know that you are there... If they are aware of you the lest likely that they will hit you... Which is one minor detail that is very important to you. :)

sailjunkie 07-09-2010 05:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Faster (Post 620575)
We routinely have to cross a couple of major shipping channels coming and going from Vancouver BC.. container ships, bulk carriers, tankers transit inbound and outbound regularly at at surprising speed most days.

We know folks who have 'stalled' while crossing (engine trouble, no breeze) and they did call the ship, and in another case put out a "pan pan" and the ship was able to deviate around them. So it's important to keep the information channels open too.

Sometimes I feel like a swivel neck keeping an eye out for potential conflicts during the half hour or so it takes to cross these lanes an right angles..

You are talking about English Bay, and my reaction to your entire post is "Amen" to that! However, I can live with a sore neck. :D

Faster 07-09-2010 05:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sailjunkie (Post 621082)
You are talking about English Bay, and my reaction to your entire post is "Amen" to that! However, I can live with a sore neck. :D

Mark - took a drive by Reid Pt Marina last week.. saw your boat - lookin' good!


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