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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #21  
Old 10-05-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swimnfit View Post
Let me see if I've got this right...
If I drop my headsail.
Tie my tiller off.
I can create a "slick" on the surface of the water upwind from my boat?
If anything, I think the actor/narrator made a mistake and intended to illustrate the "slick" downwind and in the lee of the mainail.
Just my thought
I think you're a bit confused.... since the mainsail doesn't create the slick. The slick formed by the boat’s hull and keel would be to WINDWARD of the boat, as the boat drifts downwind. This helps protect the boat from waves which are moving DOWNWIND...and towards the boat.


crap... Rich beat me to it.....
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  #22  
Old 10-05-2010
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Would the main only heave-to pertain more to a full keeler than a fin keel? I'm really having trouble with this main only concept. The fluid-dynamics equations just aren't adding up for a C27.
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  #23  
Old 10-06-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
Would the main only heave-to pertain more to a full keeler than a fin keel? I'm really having trouble with this main only concept. The fluid-dynamics equations just aren't adding up for a C27.
Every boat is different - you just gotta experiment. Often as not, [unless you need a kip or to repair something], its really blowin, so you are reefed down.

3/4 rigs use more main - so it is more of the power. An old IOR, like a UFO34 has a smallish main and a huge genny (its main power).

To 'KISS'- you need the weather helm off the main to round up and the headsail to push the bow away. So you zig zag a little and slide 'downhill' - this creates what they are referring to ' the slick'.

Not every boat can heave to. I can in the Peterson, but prefer to slowly go to windward with only the storm jib up [ but I have not been caught out in anything beyond 65-70kn - so this is just my experiences]

I tack the storm jib on behind the furler and hoist it on a halyard at the 2nd spreader [where I have backstays]. This sail's luff has an angle of about 60 deg.

On the occasion I have needed it, I had its halyard and sheets ready. The sail in its bag with 100mm velcro at the opening. So, I hoisted it, the velcro popped and the sail went up, flogging just a little until the halyard was tight. I have a downhawl as well.

Although it all works well, I am always re-assessing how to do it all better and safer. (Thats where you guys come into the equation - thanks in advance)

{unrelated - but; I only have 2 reefs in the main. The reef points lie about where a normal 2nd and 3rd would lie and I use an outhawl and a downhawl at the mast.}
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Last edited by St Anna; 10-06-2010 at 06:16 AM.
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  #24  
Old 10-06-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by St Anna View Post
I tack the storm jib on behind the furler and hoist it on a halyard at the 2nd spreader [where I have backstays]. This sail's luff has an angle of about 60 deg.
The fact that you had it rigged and in the bag was wise. I do the same offshore with my staysail on a removable inner forestay. There is no way I want to lug a sail through the cabin and over the deck and try to hank it on AFTER things get bumpy. That's simply too late. It all gets rigged at the dock before we push off. That chore is on the list for next week in preparation for heading East in early November.
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  #25  
Old 10-06-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by killarney_sailor View Post
Also, what worked well the last time you hove-to may need to be modified for a new situation.
This was an important point, if I remember. What you did to heave-to in 15-20 knots (sail combination, sheets, rudder, etc.), will be very different, for the same boat, when in 40 knots.

Additionally, in really bad conditions, your rudder will break unless you securely tie it off.
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Old 10-06-2010
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FWIW, the crew in the video needs to fully release the main until the boat stopped, then they could trim it a bit if they wanted to adjust how the boat sits off the wind.

As their jib pushes the bow off, the main pushes it up, if the main is trimmed enough, it'll tack the boat, backed jib or no.
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  #27  
Old 10-06-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
Would the main only heave-to pertain more to a full keeler than a fin keel? I'm really having trouble with this main only concept. The fluid-dynamics equations just aren't adding up for a C27.
Yes it's primarily a full/long keel technique; although it 'can' be done with a fin keel with trys'l or triple reefed main flying.
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Old 10-07-2010
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To clarify

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichH View Post
My impression of the Pardey technique of being hove-to a parachute is that it keeps the boat from drifting OUT or DOWN FROM the 'turbulence slick'; keeps the boat WITHIN the turbulence slick. Therefore NOT to prevent forereaching.
I think it is to stop you from sailing away from the slick. If you are drifting to leeward with no forward motion you will just be creating more slick which is what you want. The problem is that with conventional heaving-to you tend to move forward and leave the slick behind (at least partially).
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Old 10-07-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
The fact that you had it rigged and in the bag was wise. I do the same offshore with my staysail on a removable inner forestay. There is no way I want to lug a sail through the cabin and over the deck and try to hank it on AFTER things get bumpy. That's simply too late. It all gets rigged at the dock before we push off. That chore is on the list for next week in preparation for heading East in early November.
Yeah, it seems common sense to me, but most people dont seem to do this.
Have a great trip in November.
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  #30  
Old 10-08-2010
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I'm in - balance

First - sailingdog, donradcliff, something Anna - all said wrote cool stuff.
I can't remember exactly what the book says (Hvy WX Sailing), never saw the vid.
To me me "heaving to" means this:
ballancing a boat. Storm tactic, ya - if you can ballance it. Every boat and sail configuation is different. Of course, wind spd and seas come into it.
If ya want to learn more about "heavin to" (on your ride)- give it a try.
It's about ballancing a particular boat, and a particular situation.
It'll be a totally different deal if you need to "heave to" to save your arse.

Wx is a thing.
Safe sailing
Max
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