SailNet Community

SailNet Community (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/)
-   Seamanship & Navigation (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/seamanship-navigation/)
-   -   Heave to, WTH? (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/seamanship-navigation/68776-heave-wth.html)

T37Chef 10-03-2010 09:09 PM

Heave to, WTH?
 
I dont know how I can link the exact video, but follow the link below and watch the clip about "Heave to"..., they lost me, this is not my understanding of what to do?

TheSailingChannel

T37Chef 10-03-2010 09:24 PM

Wait!!!
 
Not so sure this is a good example of heaving to...

YouTube - Example of Heaving To

Faster 10-03-2010 09:26 PM

That's a pretty authoritative source,(post 1) but I agree with your take on it.. not heaving to as I understand it. Even the sketch, with the 'slick' to weather makes no sense to me....

Your link's gone south, Chef, on post 2...

SVAuspicious 10-04-2010 02:53 AM

Certainly not how I do it on Auspicious.

I keep the headsail up and ease the main. To avoid forereaching I have to reef the heck out of the main. Even then, if I sheet the main in enough to stop the noise we make a bit over a knot to windward in 15-20 kts breeze.

Made Janet cranky as we watched the lights of Marsh Harbour fade behind us while waiting for the sun to come up before running the cut into the Sea of Abaco. *grin*

jslade8581 10-04-2010 07:27 AM

I think the confusion is based on two things:

1. The technique of heaving-to. Most of us probably got the basic concept as a set of instructions (tack the boat through the wind without shifting the jib, letting it back, then lash the tiller to leeward or towards the mainsail). But heaving-to is defined as "using any sail combination, any gear combination necessary to get your boat to lie stopped, about 50 degrees from the wind and drifting slowly, directly away from the wind behind its own slick" (Storm Tactics, Pardey and Pardey, p. 13). The method that the video narrator describes is his method of heaving-to.

2. The concept of the slick. Again, based on Storm Tactics, the slick breaks up waves in bad gales, which will help protect the boat. In fact, Storm Tactics is pretty much a dissertation on how and why you should heave-to in gales vice running, lying a-hull, or any other basic storm method. They made a believer out of me.

Annnnnd this post just became an advertisement for Storms Tactics. Here's a link to it: Amazon.com.

sailingdog 10-04-2010 08:17 AM

Of course, the particular combination of sails and helm position will really depend on the specific boat and wind/wave conditions. What works well for one boat, may not work at all on another. What works well in 30 knots of wind may not work in 40 knots.

PalmettoSailor 10-04-2010 08:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jslade8581 (Post 650751)
I think the confusion is based on two things:

1. The technique of heaving-to. Most of us probably got the basic concept as a set of instructions (tack the boat through the wind without shifting the jib, letting it back, then lash the tiller to leeward or towards the mainsail). But heaving-to is defined as "using any sail combination, any gear combination necessary to get your boat to lie stopped, about 50 degrees from the wind and drifting slowly, directly away from the wind behind its own slick" (Storm Tactics, Pardey and Pardey, p. 13). The method that the video narrator describes is his method of heaving-to.

2. The concept of the slick. Again, based on Storm Tactics, the slick breaks up waves in bad gales, which will help protect the boat. In fact, Storm Tactics is pretty much a dissertation on how and why you should heave-to in gales vice running, lying a-hull, or any other basic storm method. They made a believer out of me.

Annnnnd this post just became an advertisement for Storms Tactics. Here's a link to it: Amazon.com.

Yeah, that.

Heaving to in 15 knots to have a relaxing lunch in the cockpit is a different animal from heaving to to spare wear and tear on the boat and crew in storm conditions.

There is no way your jib would survive being bashed against the speaders in 30-40 knots for hours. I personally wouldn't want the jib up if were heaving to even in as little as 20 knots of wind. Even in the winds I typically sail in, I roll in some jib before heaving to to keep the jib from touching anything.

I haven't yet practiced heaving to with main only in heavier winds but its something I would like to try, as it seems a good strategy if the forecast is off and things start to get out of hand.

smackdaddy 10-04-2010 10:02 AM

Woah, woah, woah. WTH?

With just a main up (I assume full canvass since he mentioned going straight to the heave to instead of reefing) - and the tiller only 20 degrees to leeward, aren't you going to round up at the first big gust?

What am I missing here?

legarots 10-04-2010 10:10 AM

I think the Pardey's also use a parachute anchor with this technique. Prevents rounding up and also serves to create the "slick"

SVAuspicious 10-04-2010 11:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by midlifesailor (Post 650788)
Heaving to in 15 knots to have a relaxing lunch in the cockpit is a different animal from heaving to to spare wear and tear on the boat and crew in storm conditions.

There is no way your jib would survive being bashed against the speaders in 30-40 knots for hours. I personally wouldn't want the jib up if were heaving to even in as little as 20 knots of wind. Even in the winds I typically sail in, I roll in some jib before heaving to to keep the jib from touching anything.

Mostly true, at least on my boat.

In 15 - 20 kts I haven't found a way to avoid making some boat speed to windward. I haven't given up yet either. *grin*

As the wind comes up we sit broader to the wind and ultimately drift to leeward(ish).

While I have a 135 on the furler on Chesapeake Bay offshore I carry a 100. Hove-to the sail doesn't touch any of the rigging. I have leathers to wrap around the jib sheet if need be, but so far every evolution has had the sheet well down on the shroud roller and chafe hasn't been an issue.

As noted, different boats will respond somewhat differently but the concepts are the same.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:00 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012