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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #11  
Old 01-14-2011
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Any info on the purpose and affect of the keeping the jib amidship with both sheets taut, rather than backwinding the jib on on side.
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Old 01-14-2011
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My (limited) understanding based on reading Hawk's 2005 article on heaving to is that forereaching is when you are still making headway, whether you are hove to or whether you are specifically trying to forereach (main only sheeted in, helm centered - the boat falls off the wind and increases speed - once there is enough speed for water on the rudder and steerage it steers itself back into wind and stalls).
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  #13  
Old 01-14-2011
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That seems like a reasonable interpretation... before I read this thread, I had never heard of anybody doing that intentionally.

Sounds rough on the sails, though.
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  #14  
Old 01-30-2011
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Myth or magic?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barquito View Post
Does this have an effect pronounced enough to disrupt a wave that would otherwise cause a problem (pretty big breaking wave)? I know L and L Pardey describe is as almost miraculous. Or would you consider other tactics if there were breaking waves large enough to roll you?
I have been able to heave to and benefit from the upwind slick it leaves, it really smooths out the water next to the boat. In a good breeze and mild sea it has made the boat amazingly comfortable.

But I have a very hard time believing that the slick could noticeably affect the kind of large breaking wave that capsizes a suitable offshore boat. Could that be a myth we just choose to believe? If a big (half your boat length or higher), steep, breaking wave hits you broadside or from the quarter, it really could care less whether the water next to your boat is slick or rough.

Of course if you heave to and your boat doesn't capsize it seems like it worked; but maybe the wave with your name on it never came?

This is just speculation, and really an open question to more experienced sailors, am I offbase? Should I trust more in heaving to? I haven't been out in the kind of seas where a wave would be likely to capsize me
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Old 01-31-2011
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[QUOTE=

If you're fore-reaching, you're effectively constantly sailing out of this slick, and so you lose its protection.[/QUOTE]

Been reading the Pardy and other books on heavy weather sailing, just in case.
I heave to all the time for short breaks, lunch or while fishing ,sail mostly single handed and its easier than anchoring. Never had to yet for heavy weather, not sure I would but its an option.
My Westerly Centaur will fore reach ACROSS the wind with the headsail reefed well down, not backed winded, and the rudder tied off to keep her into the wind. No main necessary but then the bilge keels are very short and probably affects the way she lays.
I can decide which way to forereach by going either port or starbord tack. Have seen the slick form to windward as she rolls back and can stay in it by reducing the jib. She lyes fairly broadside at this so again not sure I,d chanch it.
PS how did I miss this thread as I generaly have a look every day or so.
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Old 01-31-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kulokoo View Post
But I have a very hard time believing that the slick could noticeably affect the kind of large breaking wave that capsizes a suitable offshore boat. Could that be a myth we just choose to believe?
I believe the Pardeys give specific examples of waves that they saw breaking, ones that they believed large enough to capsize them, being smoothed out in the area of their slick.

When you think of how much energy is being transferred into the water when you're hove to, it's not hard to believe that it can work. The wind is pushing pretty hard on your boat, which instead of sailing along at breathtaking pace is just digging in to the water and holding on. In a sense all that energy is instead being used to disrupt the normal pattern of the sea.
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  #17  
Old 01-31-2011
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By far the best analysis of storm tactics I've seen thus far (and I've done extensive reading in this area, including all of the Pardey's books / videos) is Hal Roth's new(ish) book, Handling Storms at Sea. He discusses at length the situations where each technique should be used and their strengths and limitations, including applicabilty to different types of boats and different sea conditions. Techniques discussed include heaving to, forereaching, lying ahull, running off, use of parchutes (including standard deployment vs. Pardey method), use of drouges (including series vs. others), etc. etc.. He gives numerous success/fail examples pertaining to use of these technicques.

Hal respectfully discusses the applicablity and limitations of using the Pardey method (i.e., a parachute deployed at angle using a bridle and keeping the boat within a slick).

I'd be very interested in having the Sailnet experts weigh in on a discussion of Hal's new book. I think that'd take the discussions on storm tactics a significant step forward and might lead to a more informed consensus.
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Old 01-31-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MC1 View Post
By far the best analysis of storm tactics I've seen thus far (and I've done extensive reading in this area, including all of the Pardey's books / videos) is Hal Roth's new(ish) book, Handling Storms at Sea.
Are you talking about the 2008 edition? Or is there a newer one?
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Old 01-31-2011
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Yes, 2008 edition, (c) 2009. (I've started a seperate thread in the Seamanship forum on this topic so as not to highjack this thread.)
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Old 02-01-2011
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In my last yacht (a 45ft ketch) I was easily able to heave too just by using the mizzen. The yacht had a full keel so this also helped.

With my current yacht (UFO 34) I suspect the smaller keel and lighter weight will mean that the yacht will not heave too easily and forereaching maybe the only option if I wish to keep the "pointy" end facing the weather.

Like a few other posters I think the yacht design has a big impact on whether you foreach or heave too. However I also believe the weather will also have an impact. For example a yacht that is happy to heave-too @ 20kts may start to foreach at 30knts. You maybe able to adjust sails, etc to bring it back to a heave-too position.

I also belive that both heaving too and foreaching are tactics that can be used both for "parking" the yacht and also for heavy weather tactics. I previously did an analysis of Jon Sander's heavy weather tactics (during his double and triple circumnavigations) and he sucessfully used both in Force 10+ conditions.

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