Single Handing Made Easy - What Are Your Techniques? - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
 Not a Member? 

Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Like Tree3Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 06-07-2011
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Southern California
Posts: 649
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
WDS123 is on a distinguished road
First off - get a boat that is designed to be single Handed

absolutes
1) Lead lines to cockpit
2) self tending jib
3) jackstays

Desirable
4) furling headsail
5) single line reefing

Skills good to have
6) humility ( know when not to go out )
7) hove-to
8) sail onto a dock or mooring
10) trim sails so the boat steers itself steady w/o autopilot
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 06-07-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Three Mile Harbor, East Hampton, NY
Posts: 463
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 8
tweitz is on a distinguished road
One useful thing many people don't use is a downhaul line on the main. Before I had a boat with an autopilot, the trickiest thing other than docking was to lower the main. Even though the halyard was led to the cockpit, I would turn into the wind, release the halyard, and I would then have to run to the mast to pull the sail down. The boat would drift off the wind and make things difficult. So I started to rig a downhaul line most of the way up on the main, led to a turning block at the base of the mast and then back to the cockpit. This enabled me to do most of the work from the cockpit and get the sail down most of the way without running up to the mast.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 06-07-2011
pdqaltair's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Posts: 2,215
Thanks: 1
Thanked 33 Times in 33 Posts
Rep Power: 6
pdqaltair is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by b40Ibis View Post
Electric wenches are key to single handling. The hardest thing is holding the button down!
I'm not at all certain I can handle and electric wench single handed, not at my age.
__________________
(when asked how he reached the starting holds on a difficult rock climbing problem that clearly favored taller climbers - he was perhaps 5'5")

"Well, I just climb up to them."

by Joe Brown, English rock climber




To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 06-08-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,370
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
puddinlegs is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by tweitz View Post
One useful thing many people don't use is a downhaul line on the main. Before I had a boat with an autopilot, the trickiest thing other than docking was to lower the main. Even though the halyard was led to the cockpit, I would turn into the wind, release the halyard, and I would then have to run to the mast to pull the sail down. The boat would drift off the wind and make things difficult. So I started to rig a downhaul line most of the way up on the main, led to a turning block at the base of the mast and then back to the cockpit. This enabled me to do most of the work from the cockpit and get the sail down most of the way without running up to the mast.
Something seems wrong here. Does your main have slugs, cars, or is it just a bolt rope? I don't think I've ever been on a boat that need a line to help get the main down. Of course if you're going downwind and the main is pressed against the spreaders, all bets are off.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 06-08-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,370
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
puddinlegs is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by WDSchock View Post
First off - get a boat that is designed to be single Handed these are a very rare beast... fortunately, most boats can be modified to work for single handing

absolutes
1) Lead lines to cockpit check! in general, a good idea
2) self tending jib lot's and lot's of very successful exceptions to this
3) jackstays do you mean jack lines? If so, absolutely! And a harness and
tether to go with them!


Desirable
4) furling headsail or hanks for smaller boats
5) single line reefing standard slab is common and works as well

Skills good to have
6) humility ( know when not to go out ) yep!
7) hove-to heaving to? some designs do this well, others not so much
8) sail onto a dock or mooring yep! good skills to have
10) trim sails so the boat steers itself steady w/o autopilot
tough on many fin keel boats that still make fine single handers,


I'd add, a good steering system (autopilot, lashing, or windvane system)
Lazy jacks for the main, a good sea berth, simple accessible/repairable systems (electical, plumbing, mechanical) Really good binoculars. An AIS receiver would be nice. A handheld GPS and a good knife on your person. There are more, but the baby's waking up! Cheers!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 06-08-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Three Mile Harbor, East Hampton, NY
Posts: 463
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 8
tweitz is on a distinguished road
puddinlegs --

You are right that if the boat was headed into the wind the mainsail would come down without help. My problem in pre autopilot days was that the boat would fall off when I left the wheel to get ready to lower the main. The downhaul helped me do what I needed even as the boat fell off the wind. This was all on a long ago boat. Now, with my trusty autopilot, I don't need to worry about these things anymore.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 06-08-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 583
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 6
NCC320 is on a distinguished road
Dropping the Mainsail

Quote:
Originally Posted by tweitz View Post
One useful thing many people don't use is a downhaul line on the main. Before I had a boat with an autopilot, the trickiest thing other than docking was to lower the main. Even though the halyard was led to the cockpit, I would turn into the wind, release the halyard, and I would then have to run to the mast to pull the sail down. The boat would drift off the wind and make things difficult. So I started to rig a downhaul line most of the way up on the main, led to a turning block at the base of the mast and then back to the cockpit. This enabled me to do most of the work from the cockpit and get the sail down most of the way without running up to the mast.
On my boat, I've found that coating the sail slugs (and sail track) with Sailkote makes the sail easy to hoist and that, on my boat at least, if you get sail luffing first, it will drop very fast on it's own when the halyard is released. I don't have an autopilot (but do lock down the wheel brake to give me a minute to get to the halyard stopper) and have tried several ways. I do have the Dutchman furling system (2 monofilment lines alternately passed through the sail in a number of places, attached to foot of sail at bottom, to topping lift at top). In my case, dropping it quick with boat motoring ahead at some speed into the wind, sail luffing, seems best. The boat doesn't have time to fall off and fill the sail. (my halyard is led to the cockpit so I don't have to leave the cockpit).
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 06-08-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 2,129
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
WanderingStar is on a distinguished road
I don't lead the lines aft. It helps that my boat is heavy and steady on her helm. I set my mizzen first and strike it last. With that set I can walk forward to handle the halyards at the mainmast. Like a previous poster, I try to allow myself time and take my time. Haste is the enemy of the sailor.
Mystic1 likes this.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 06-08-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,370
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
puddinlegs is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingStar View Post
I don't lead the lines aft. It helps that my boat is heavy and steady on her helm. I set my mizzen first and strike it last. With that set I can walk forward to handle the halyards at the mainmast. Like a previous poster, I try to allow myself time and take my time. Haste is the enemy of the sailor.
Very true!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 06-08-2011
casey1999's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: HI
Posts: 2,845
Thanks: 4
Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts
Rep Power: 4
casey1999 is on a distinguished road
This was on another thread on sailnet, upload the tips book- worth its weight in gold.
Singlehanded Tips Book
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Single handing Irwin32 Seamanship & Navigation 140 06-01-2011 02:26 PM
Single handing skills cb32863 Learning to Sail 23 07-06-2010 10:39 AM
First single-handing Livia herSailNet 18 06-25-2009 09:44 AM
I am a single handing GOD! jbarros General Discussion (sailing related) 24 07-01-2008 10:06 AM
single handing foredeckman Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 0 01-18-2003 07:38 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:08 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.