Single Handing Made Easy - What Are Your Techniques? - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
 Not a Member? 

Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Like Tree3Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 06-08-2011
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 56
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
williamkiester is on a distinguished road
These are inspiration posts for a new boat owner who will probably be single-handing a bit. I have a simple question, what are the best techniques for picking up a mooring single-handed. Also what are the best ways to shove off from a mooring single-handed. I've done this several times in a Rhodes 18 (yes 18) but don't feel that I am good at it. I would walk it back until I felt cnfortable cranking up the engine. Or sail off at times. Now I have a Luders 33. Seems like I should have better technique for the bigger less forgiving boat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 06-08-2011
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Southern California
Posts: 649
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
WDS123 is on a distinguished road
Pudding,


Good comments, here are some thoughts:

1) necessity of self tending jib - I am going to argue that a self tending jib makes single handing makes short tacking up a tight channel a delight instead of a chore.

2) necessity to be able to trim sails to stay on course without using the tiller - agreed that there are few and far between boats that one can accomplish this easily, but I will argue that this is a simple test of how well you can manage the basic sailing qualities of your vessel.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 06-09-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 584
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 6
NCC320 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingStar View Post
I don't lead the lines aft. It helps that my boat is heavy and steady on her helm. I set my mizzen first and strike it last. With that set I can walk forward to handle the halyards at the mainmast. Like a previous poster, I try to allow myself time and take my time. Haste is the enemy of the sailor.
In general, I agree with you that haste is the enemy of the sailor. Take as long as you need to to set up for docking (for example), make a pass or two to assess the situation, adjust the lines and docking plan, think out a Plan B in case things go wrong. Not doing these things, or haphazardly doing them in haste is likely to create problems. But, there comes a point where one has to execute his actions smartly and quickly (i.e. fast) or there will be consequences. Once you start the docking, let's say you are going bow first and are going to drop a pretied spring line over the outer slip piling. Even at 1-2 kts., and especially if there is cross wind or current, the window of opportunity to get that spring line over the piling is very brief. You will get only one, possibly two attempts. Take too long in doing it, and you've got a new set of problems....how to stop that boat before damage is done.

In my earlier post regarding someone having difficulty in lowering the mainsail, I used the term fast. The referenced post was that the poster had difficulty getting his sail down without a downhaul because the boat fell off and the sail filled while he was trying to drop it, creating additional forces. The suggestion was:

1) coat the sail slugs/slides and sail track with Sailkote. It is expensive but it really works to lower friction.

2) describing that if he could keep the sail luffing, it would be easier to get down, and that in my own experience, getting the sail down quickly before the boat dropped off (he now has a autopilot to prevent this, but many do not) and sail filled was the best way. Again, take as long as you need to set up, but once you release the halyard, let the sail come down smartly (i.e. quick). Otherwise, most fin keel boats will drop off, filling the sail and creating the forces he was dealing with.

Summary...most of the time haste is bad, but sometimes fast is needed. And good planning and execution will seek to minimize the times that fast is needed.

Last edited by NCC320; 06-09-2011 at 10:29 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 06-09-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 2,128
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
WanderingStar is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by williamkiester View Post
These are inspiration posts for a new boat owner who will probably be single-handing a bit. I have a simple question, what are the best techniques for picking up a mooring single-handed. Also what are the best ways to shove off from a mooring single-handed. I've done this several times in a Rhodes 18 (yes 18) but don't feel that I am good at it. I would walk it back until I felt cnfortable cranking up the engine. Or sail off at times. Now I have a Luders 33. Seems like I should have better technique for the bigger less forgiving boat.
William, I use a mooring in a small crowded harbor. I start my motor and warm it up while uncovering the sails. I watch the wind and current, also the traffic waiting for a safe window. The wind and current are going to determine which way the boat falls off. When I'm ready, I drop the pendant and walk back aft to power off. Usually I put the helm over as soon as engaging the engine to clear the mooring. If sailing off I still have the engine idling in neutral for safety.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 06-09-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 2,128
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
WanderingStar is on a distinguished road
Picking it up can be more challenging, I try to approach and stop right when the pickup stick is alongside the cleat. If I miss long or short I come back around.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 06-09-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 584
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 6
NCC320 is on a distinguished road
Docking Assist Lines Lead Aft

It has been mentioned that leading control lines aft to the cockpit area is beneficial to the single hander. The same can be done for a few critical lines that you use to assist in docking. On my boat, I have done the following and find it helpful in that it reduces the time that I must be away from the helm station during docking.

At the bow stemplate, I have shackled two Series 50 Ronstan single blocks(for 1/2" lines) to the stem plate. These could be also shackled to either bow or amidships cleats as you desire. One block is for starboard, the other is for port lines. At the pushpit rail on either side, I have added a CS Johnson Pulpit Anchor bracket, and shackled to it a Garhauer 30-05 Fiddle Block with Camcleat. I use a piece of velcro strap to hold the blocks off the deck when not in use, and a small bungee cord to support them when in use.

I typically back into my slip, so the description will be for that case. I also have some very long lines that I use in this procedure. On one end, tie a carabineer hook if you use a buddy line, or a large loop if you don't. On the windward side of the boat, starting at the helm station/stern cleat area, temporarily place this loop on cleat, then lead the line over and outboard of the lifelines forward to the bow, through one of the bow stem blocks (or amidships cleat/block per your choice), back down the deck inside the lifelines, through the genoa sheet turning block, two turns around the winch, then to/through the Fiddle Block and secure with the camcleat.

When I start into my slip, I bring my stern close to the windward piling, and clip the caribineer into the buddy line and my bow is tied to the slip. If there were no buddy line or you are tying off a springline, drop the loop in its end over the piling or cleat. Now, I can tend this forward line from the helm station. If there is a lot of tension on the line, I can also use the winch to pull the bow in. My stern cleat is still free to use for a stern or other line as I need.

Typically, for my home setup with the buddy lines, I clip a second caribineer hook onto the buddy line and tie it off at the stern cleat. Now, I use the engine to back the boat into the slip. The stern slides along the buddy line (a loop/knot in the buddy line will prevent going too far along the line) and I tend the bow or amidships line. And this is at my helm station, so I don't have to go far. It works very well and I believe is applicable to either stern or bow first docking...the lines would be set differently, but still using the blocks. All the blocks are permanently in place to speed preparation for docking.

Last edited by NCC320; 06-09-2011 at 11:56 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 06-09-2011
Barquito's Avatar
Barquito
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 2,073
Thanks: 0
Thanked 18 Times in 18 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Barquito is on a distinguished road
I always had a little trouble sailing off the pin. It helped to have the tiller lashed to the side so the boat will reverse in the direction I wanted it to go. Then while at the bow, wait for the boat stern to swing to the the side I wanted, then let the mooring line go slack. I could still hold the end of the mooring line while the bow started to fall off the wind. If I didn't like how it looked, I could just re-cleat the line and try again. If it looked good then I would let the line go, and walk calmly back to the helm while the boat backed until on a beam reach.

Landing at the pin, I found it helpful that I had my dinghy attached to the pin... more stuff to try to grab.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 06-09-2011
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 56
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
williamkiester is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingStar View Post
William, I use a mooring in a small crowded harbor. I start my motor and warm it up while uncovering the sails. I watch the wind and current, also the traffic waiting for a safe window. The wind and current are going to determine which way the boat falls off. When I'm ready, I drop the pendant and walk back aft to power off. Usually I put the helm over as soon as engaging the engine to clear the mooring. If sailing off I still have the engine idling in neutral for safety.
To confirm: you are powering off forward, not in reverse and the bow is moving away from the mooring by the wind and current, then the tiller. Do you have to worry about skidding the stern/prop into the mooring or do you fall off fast enough to not have a chance of that?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 06-09-2011
CaptainForce's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: living aboard since 1972
Posts: 1,709
Thanks: 0
Thanked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 9
CaptainForce will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barquito View Post
I always had a little trouble sailing off the pin. It helped to have the tiller lashed to the side so the boat will reverse in the direction I wanted it to go. Then while at the bow, wait for the boat stern to swing to the the side I wanted, then let the mooring line go slack. I could still hold the end of the mooring line while the bow started to fall off the wind..........
I like these interesting ideas that are new to me. Much depends on the specific characteristics of your boat. For me & my vessel, I often do best by pulling out a couple feet (or more in less wind) of roller furled jib; then, at the proper swing I backwind the piece of headsail to encourage my desired tack. Take care and joy, Aythya crew
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 06-10-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 2,128
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
WanderingStar is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by williamkiester View Post
To confirm: you are powering off forward, not in reverse and the bow is moving away from the mooring by the wind and current, then the tiller. Do you have to worry about skidding the stern/prop into the mooring or do you fall off fast enough to not have a chance of that?
Generally yes, I power ahead. If I pass close to the dinghy or ball I put her in neutral. But usually between the wind pushing the bow off and the rudder turning it's not a problem.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Single handing Irwin32 Seamanship & Navigation 140 06-01-2011 03:26 PM
Single handing skills cb32863 Learning to Sail 23 07-06-2010 11:39 AM
First single-handing Livia herSailNet 18 06-25-2009 10:44 AM
I am a single handing GOD! jbarros General Discussion (sailing related) 24 07-01-2008 11:06 AM
single handing foredeckman Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 0 01-18-2003 08:38 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:00 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.