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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #11  
Old 06-09-2011
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The main largely serves to affect the angle at which the boat sits to the wind...partially trimmed and you sit close, eased out and you sit broadly..except if the main is trimmed in close it is likely to overpower the jib and tack the boat (regardless of rudder angle).
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  #12  
Old 06-10-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulk View Post
If you're out in conditions that warrant heaving to in a Rhodes 19, you should have stayed in port in the first place. Unless you feel like having a picnic lunch without having to anchor.
A. Good learning experience that can be applied to bigger boats.
B. Put in/shake out reef.
C. ^^Lunch
D. Teach sailors-in-training how to stop the boat and hold it roughly steady with the sails up in case the skipper falls out.
E. It's cool to show guests the sails working against themselves instead of together.
F. Switch roles in the boat when it's "crowded."
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  #13  
Old 06-10-2011
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Your boat is the same or similar to mine, a cb 19' mariner. I was out at Cape Lookout practicing heaving to. With the main up and no jib it did fine, the main was out pretty far with the tiller out pretty far also on the same side of the boat. This worked two different times, wind about 15. A couple of days later I tried it again with the jib up also and the boat wouldn't settle down. A good skill to have when single-handing like I was and you need a break to figure out where the deeper water is. Enjoy.
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Old 07-10-2011
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I've had similar experiences in both my centerboard boats. They never really settle down well. But in my shoal keel/centerboard O-Day 22 it is totally different. It feels like the boat is sitting in the parking lot its so stable.
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  #15  
Old 07-10-2011
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I also believed it was the rudder that turned you back into the wind (working against the jib), not the main sail. So as stated in the post above, release the main sheet and let the wind spill from the main sail.
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Old 07-16-2011
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Not every yacht/boat will heave to. Is a Rhodes 19 a 19 footer.
If so, then you can play with rig/sail config much easier than a larger yacht.

The theory is that the jib is backed and will push you off the wind. The main and the rudder will round you up - therefore play with the power of the 2 sails to get the desired effect.

Older designs will heave to more readily than a more modern design.
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Old 07-18-2011
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I thought that in a heave to situation you put the tiller to leeward, which would be pointing away from the mainsail, not toward it. That way, the pressure of the backwinded jib is counteracted by the rudder.

Is that not correct?
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Old 07-18-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaschrumpf View Post
I thought that in a heave to situation you put the tiller to leeward, which would be pointing away from the mainsail, not toward it.
Usually the main is on the leeward side of the boat.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaschrumpf View Post
I thought that in a heave to situation you put the tiller to leeward, which would be pointing away from the mainsail, not toward it. That way, the pressure of the backwinded jib is counteracted by the rudder.

Is that not correct?
Tiller to leeward, points the rudder away from the main...
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  #20  
Old 07-18-2011
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If you like to heave to during lunch, consider doing it on starboard tack. Makes it less likely you will have to change course while eating.
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