Bow in or stern in at the dock? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
 Not a Member? 

Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 06-28-2011
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 89
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Petar is on a distinguished road
Bow in or stern in at the dock?

I've been reading various posts on this form and have watched people in the marina mooring their boats various ways. In essence, majority of boats are tied "bow in" and lesser number "stern in". I owned a 31 and now 38 ft sailboat and always tie "bow in". I have not even tried tying "stern in". Firstly, every boat including sailboats are much more maouverable coming "bow in" to the slip. The bow of the boat is much stronger should you misjudge and hit or ride up the dock which has never happened to me so far. i do not want to even try to think about the damage I can sustain should I misjudge and ride up the dock with my stern and damage the rudder in the process. When we are leaving the dock we are usually fresh and rested and a bit more difficult manouver to come out sternway should not be that hard to execute. On the other hand, when we are returning back to the slip after a day or several days of sailing, cruising etc, we are definitely more exhausted and need more focus on how do we "park" the boat. Finally, I fail to see the benefit of tying the boat "stern in". Can someone try and clarify it for me, why would someone do that in the first place.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 06-28-2011
PBzeer's Avatar
Wandering Aimlessly
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Cruising
Posts: 19,703
Thanks: 0
Thanked 75 Times in 72 Posts
Rep Power: 14
PBzeer has a spectacular aura about PBzeer has a spectacular aura about PBzeer has a spectacular aura about
In part, it depends on your individual situation. Another factor can be ease of access or prevailing winds, tides or currents. Some would rather back in, than back out. Some like to be able to "watch" the dock, while others may prefer privacy. Mostly, it's just one's own preference.
__________________
John
Ontario 32 - Aria

Free, is the heart, that lives not, in fear.
Full, is the spirit, that thinks not, of falling.
True, is the soul, that hesitates not, to give.
Alive, is the one, that believes, in love.
JCP


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Website & Blog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 06-28-2011
blt2ski's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 6,641
Thanks: 0
Thanked 18 Times in 17 Posts
Rep Power: 10
blt2ski will become famous soon enough
I'd agree with PB re personal preference. I do generally speaking back in. Altho I have sailed in forwards a few weeks back. For me, backing in is somewhat easier than forward in/reverse out. As the back in works with the prop kick, back out, I am opposite of the prop kick! Also for what ever reason, I find loading backed in to be easier, or at least from the proverbial psych end of things it seems easier. backed in also faces the generally speaking south wind, altho in the summer a northwesterly is the more prevalent. That is usually a bit more on the side vs the higher winds out of the south in the winter on the nose/stern of the boat. backed in with the nose out is seems to make for a better ride in 40+ knot winds.

Going out when I solo is also easier to go out forward, backing in or forward in while solo, with practice, both have become a 6 and 1/2 dozen or another! Altho in HIGH winds ie 30+, backing out is easier solo, as the wind pushes me into the dock, vs a northerly, the bow moves to the east and into the boat next to me. Altho if I had a really long line from front to stern to pull in as I go out, this would help.......

So, take you pick as to which you want to do. If you have a walk thru stern, backing in may be better for loading etc. You then have side or stern access.

Really, its all personal, no right or wrong. Of course the person acros from me goes in bow first, but he is ALL wrong about the why and where for! LOL, now to see if mr dodenja catches my he is mooring incorrectly LOLOLOL

marty
__________________
She drives me boat,
I drives me dinghy!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 06-28-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: NY
Posts: 2,242
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 7
sck5 is on a distinguished road
with a very short finger pier it is easier for my admiral to get on and off if i tie up stern to
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 06-28-2011
jackdale's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 8,736
Thanks: 25
Thanked 30 Times in 27 Posts
Rep Power: 6
jackdale will become famous soon enough
It is easier to get gear and provisions on and off a stern tied boat, especially ones with an open transoms and twin or folding wheels.

You do lose privacy when stern tied.
__________________
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Offshore Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 06-28-2011
SlowButSteady's Avatar
Senior Slacker
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: SoCal
Posts: 4,223
Thanks: 0
Thanked 17 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 5
SlowButSteady is on a distinguished road
A couple of things make stern-in docking problematic for my boat. First, my Cal 2-27 is actually about 26.5 feet LOA. But, that doesn't take the one to one and a half foot overhang of the pulpit into account. The slip is 25 feet long and I'm allowed a three foot overhang, or 28 feet from the very end of the slip to the very end of the boat (EVERYTHING included). Since my boat is just about 28 feet, including the pulpit, I would just be able to dock stern in and be legal. So, I would have to have the transom right up against the end of the slip to be legal. (When bow-in, the pulpit overhang is kosher, as long as the bow itself isn't over the edge of the dock.) However, even though the rudder on my boat isn't transom-hung, it still projects just slightly aft of the transom. This means that to be stern-in, I would probably want to leave at least a foot or two of room between the dock and the rudder, putting the bow/pulpit well beyond the three-foot overhang limit. And, apparently the harbor patrol DOES keep an eye out for such things.
__________________
Never forget them. Do something to prevent it from happening again.
Charlotte Bacon, Daniel Barden, Rachel Davino, Olivia Josephine Gay, Ana M. Marquez-Greene, Dylan Hockley, Dawn Hochsprung, Madeleine F. Hsu, Catherine V. Hubbard, Chase Kowalski, Jesse Lewis, James Mattioli , Grace McDonnell, Anne Marie Murphy, Emilie Parker, Jack Pinto, Noah Pozner, Caroline Previdi, Jessica Rekos, Avielle Richman, Lauren Rousseau, Mary Sherlach, Victoria Soto, Benjamin Wheeler, Allison N. Wyatt
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 06-28-2011
SecondWindNC's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Washington, NC
Posts: 505
Thanks: 2
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 6
SecondWindNC is on a distinguished road
It depends on the boat and the dock. Ease of boarding can be a factor, especially with fixed docks and/or short finger piers, as the boarding gates on most boats are somewhat aft of midships. Bow-in can mean climbing over the lifelines and down to the dock rather than having access to the boarding gate. Also, wind and current play a role. If your slip is downwind or down current, it can be advantageous to be tied stern-in, so that you can motor forward into that current when leaving the slip, providing more control than you would have by trying to build enough speed for steerage in reverse.

We have some boats on our dock that tie up bow-in, but over half prefer having the stern facing the dock, for their own various reasons. We always have the charter boats riding stern-in at the beginning of each charter, for boarding and so that the charterer can leave the slip by just motoring straight out in forward gear.
__________________
Carolina Wind Yachting Center, Washington, NC
Charters * Brokerage * Pacific Seacraft * Zodiac


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Who is staring at the sea is already sailing a little.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 06-28-2011
DRFerron's Avatar
A mod and her dragon
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,594
Thanks: 38
Thanked 106 Times in 103 Posts
Rep Power: 10
DRFerron is on a distinguished road
Bow In Here

We go bow in primarily because of the privacy.

People have a tendency to look down into cockpits as they walk the dock. With our stern facing away from the dock we can keep the cabin open all night without losing privacy. If we have a passenger who might have difficulty boarding we pull the boat forward enough to let down the lifelines then readjust the lines so the bowsprit doesn't bang against the dock.
__________________
Donna


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Catalina 30 TRFK

Contributing Editor
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
magazine

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Rock Hall Cruising Station

All things that are, are equally removed from being nothing. John Donne
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 06-28-2011
Tim R.'s Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Portland, Maine
Posts: 1,535
Thanks: 1
Thanked 26 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Tim R. is on a distinguished road
All based on privacy. I have power boats on either side that are stern in. We are bow in with the stern facing open water.
__________________
Tim R.
Out cruising
1997 Caliber 40LRC

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

-----------------------------------------------------
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 06-28-2011
ronspiker's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 113
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 14
ronspiker is on a distinguished road
Depends on boat, pier and mainly conditions. I prefer stern first but current and wind prevent doing that about 35% of the time.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Jackline: to stern or not to stern dreuge Gear & Maintenance 10 12-24-2009 12:23 PM
anchoring bow and stern mugsy General Discussion (sailing related) 7 01-15-2008 10:28 AM
Stern docking nthompson General Discussion (sailing related) 8 08-04-2004 12:19 AM
Bow or Stern? mattyc Learning to Sail 6 05-14-2002 10:25 PM
Stern Anchors Mark Matthews Cruising Articles 0 08-14-2000 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:26 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012