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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #21  
Old 08-11-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tempest View Post
Bill, Rudder goes to windward...the backed jib pushes the bow to leeward..the rudder to windward counteracts.
Nope. Rudder goes to leeward (away from the new windward side). It's the tiller which goes to windward. The rudder is turned this way to avoid any possibility of tacking.

It's the mainsail which keeps the bow up, not the rudder.

Because you're moving only a bit, the rudder has much less effect than when sailing. You have to experiment with your boat to find the right setting of the rudder, but on many boats it's full to leeward.

Bill

Last edited by btrayfors; 08-11-2011 at 11:00 AM.
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  #22  
Old 08-11-2011
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Originally Posted by btrayfors View Post
Nope. Rudder goes to leeward (away from the new windward side). It's the tiller which goes to windward. The rudder is turned this way to avoid any possibility of tacking.

It's the mainsail which keeps the bow up, not the rudder.

Because you're moving only a bit, the rudder has much less effect than when sailing. You have to experiment with your boat to find the right setting of the rudder, but on many boats it's full to leeward.

Bill


Mark, if you're "spinning" it sounds like you might not have the rudder positioned correctly - e.g., your rudder isn't counteracting the tack.
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  #23  
Old 08-11-2011
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File:Hove-to.svg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A picture..might help

push the tiller downwind..which puts the rudder to the wind..
Or turn a wheel to the wind..

Mark's objective was to take a reef while hove-to single handed. If the mainsail is hard on the wind..it's going to make it difficult to lower. The goal in this instance is to take pressure off the mainsail. So balancing the jib and the rudder is the key so that you can ease the main either by setting the traveler down..and maybe if nec..easing the sheet. It shouldn't take long once the pressure is off the mainsail to just drop it to the new tack and clew..

If the boat is heeling too much, or falling off to leeward with the jib backed and the main eased..then there's too much headsail out imo...

Heaving-to for an extended period in a storm is a somewhat different objective..
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Last edited by Tempest; 08-11-2011 at 11:38 AM.
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  #24  
Old 08-11-2011
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Tempest and SmackDaddy,

Uncle! My bad. A senior moment for me.

While some boats (like a ketch) might require leeward setting of the rudder , most boats will be happier with the rudder turned to windward while hove to, or possibly midships if the main pushes the bow up too much, risking an unwanted tack.

Main thing, though, is to blanket the luff of the main with the headsail backed.

Going for more coffee now :-)

Bill






Quote:
Originally Posted by Tempest View Post
File:Hove-to.svg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A picture..might help

push the tiller downwind..which puts the rudder to the wind..
Or turn a wheel to the wind..

Mark's objective was to take a reef while hove-to single handed. If the mainsail is hard on the wind..it's going to make it difficult to lower. The goal in this instance is to take pressure off the mainsail. So balancing the jib and the rudder is the key so that you can ease the main either by setting the traveler down..and maybe if nec..easing the sheet. It shouldn't take long once the pressure is off the mainsail to just drop it to the new tack and clew..

If the boat is heeling too much, or falling off to leeward with the jib backed and the main eased..then there's too much headsail out imo...

Heaving-to for an extended period in a storm is a somewhat different objective..
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  #25  
Old 08-11-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btrayfors View Post
Tempest and SmackDaddy,

Uncle! My bad. A senior moment for me.

While some boats (like a ketch) might require leeward setting of the rudder , most boats will be happier with the rudder turned to windward while hove to, or possibly midships if the main pushes the bow up too much, risking an unwanted tack.

Main thing, though, is to blanket the luff of the main with the headsail backed.

Going for more coffee now :-)

Bill

Heh-heh. Just remember, you can't make even the slightest mistake around here or you face the stick!



Tiller/wheel/rudder-direction, how can you NOT get that mixed up at times? Especially pre-coffee!
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  #26  
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The fundamental premise seems to be wrong. When hove to, the main and the rudder oppose the backed headsail. The jib wants to push the nose off the wind. The main and rudder together push the nose toward the wind. When all is in balance, it's hove to, and all that's left is a slow forereach. At this point, the main is filled and working.

If you were able to reef the main then, the forces will no longer be in balance. The jib would push the nose off the wind.

You've already solved the second problem, that of reefing. Go back out and see if you can't get it to heave to, with the main working against the backed jib.
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Old 08-21-2011
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Simple explanation here, Nauticed website has lots of lots of good tips.
I always heave-to for lunch or drift fishing with the tiller lashed to leeward but get a bit confused on wheel steered boats.,anyway in my limited experience different boats need different setups to sit nicely hove-to.
Great craic to stay in the slick and relax in choppy seas, guests are always impressed.
Sail-World.com : Heaving-to: a simple skill that needs practice
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  #28  
Old 09-07-2011
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Yup, too much head sail... or not enough helm to windward (tiller to leeward)

I heave to with my 130 head sail reefed to 50-80 and tiller full to leeward and then set and/or douse my main.
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  #29  
Old 09-07-2011
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Our Bristol 29.9 heaves-to beautifully. We can sit there all day. You do have to reduce the size of the jib to do this. If you have a furler, just furl in half, or more, of the jib to balance the wind you are in. In 25kn you might have to bring it down to the size of a storm jib.

When you need to reef the main, you shouldn't have to heave-to. Come up close to the wind then let your traveller down all the way and loosen the main sheet until the sail luffs. The boom should still be over the boat. Drop the halyard and set your reef. When done, retighten the sheet and bring the traveller back up. Works fine going to windward. Downwind, not so much.
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  #30  
Old 09-07-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hshannon View Post
Our Bristol 29.9 heaves-to beautifully. We can sit there all day. You do have to reduce the size of the jib to do this. If you have a furler, just furl in half, or more, of the jib to balance the wind you are in. In 25kn you might have to bring it down to the size of a storm jib.

When you need to reef the main, you shouldn't have to heave-to. Come up close to the wind then let your traveller down all the way and loosen the main sheet until the sail luffs. The boom should still be over the boat. Drop the halyard and set your reef. When done, retighten the sheet and bring the traveller back up. Works fine going to windward. Downwind, not so much.
Thanks for the info, will try it next time we're out.

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Last edited by MarkSF; 09-07-2011 at 03:19 PM.
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