Slow down when docking! - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
 Not a Member? 

Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Like Tree29Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 08-28-2011
jackdale's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 8,860
Thanks: 26
Thanked 37 Times in 34 Posts
Rep Power: 6
jackdale will become famous soon enough
On the question of speed.

I tell students that they should control their speed with the transmission (forward, neutral, reverse) to maintain steerage way. The throttle should only be used in reverse to stop the boat.

We usually use fin keel boats. Full keel boats need some additional speed to mainatin steerage way.
__________________
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Offshore Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 08-28-2011
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 15
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
WhiskyJohn is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by svHyLyte View Post
As a rule, if you're not bored as you come into a pier/slip, you're going too fast.
And watch the faces of anyone waiting to catch your lines... if they have that "hurry up, why are you taking so long" look on thier face, you're coming in just fine.

Another thing I've learned... you know how _your_ boat handles better than any "helpful" opinions trying to convince you to do it their way. You know how the current and or wind affects you, how your propwalk can be used or not used, whether your boat reverses well and how it handles in reverse etc. (I've a full keel boat that is posessed by demons when in reverse, but I've learned to use the prop walk to great effect for example)

Learn to trust your judgement, and give clear instructions to anyone helping catch or release lines for you. Often folks will attempt to force your boat to do what they think is correct, rather than what you had in mind.
__________________
John McCarthy
Whisky Run
Douglas 32
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 08-28-2011
jackdale's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 8,860
Thanks: 26
Thanked 37 Times in 34 Posts
Rep Power: 6
jackdale will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhiskyJohn View Post
And watch the faces of anyone waiting to catch your lines... if they have that "hurry up, why are you taking so long" look on thier face, you're coming in just fine.
One manual I use says never hand off a line to someone on the dock.

Many folks do not understand how a sailboat moves when a line is pulled.

If you are prepared to hand off a line, only pass a centre line / mid ship line. Tugging that will cause less grief. Never pass a bow breast line; a good tug that will cause you to lose the stern.
__________________
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Offshore Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 08-28-2011
MikeinLA's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 515
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
MikeinLA is on a distinguished road
I have to say that my docking is something that I'm truly proud of. Nice slow approach, no-touch on either side, a bit of reverse to stop forward motion and bring the stern to port, step off and secure the lines. No drama. Of course, it doesn't hurt that a Catalina 36 handles like a Chevrolet under power....totally predictable.

Mike
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 08-28-2011
remetau's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Bradenton, FL
Posts: 780
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 6
remetau is on a distinguished road
I always go as slow as she will do to maintain steerage. I put the throttle at about 1100 RPM and take in and out of gear as needed.

After breaking my wrist trying to hold somebody's bow off a dock and jammed into a piling, I no longer will take risks with boats. If it hits the dock, then it hits the dock. The dock and the boat are easier to repair than my body.
DRFerron and Minnewaska like this.
__________________
Don & Diana
sv Re Metau an HC33t

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 08-29-2011
L124C's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,387
Thanks: 48
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 7
L124C is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
On the question of speed.

I tell students that they should control their speed with the transmission (forward, neutral, reverse) to maintain steerage way. The throttle should only be used in reverse to stop the boat.

We usually use fin keel boats. Full keel boats need some additional speed to maintain steerage way.
As I've indicated, I agree with using the transmission. The issue is how much some skippers are depending on the reverse thrust to stop them. If you are moving at a speed at which the lack of reverse thrust will allow the boat to "bump" the dock, thats one thing. However, if it causes a 10 ton boat to climb the dock and ram into a boardwalk in back of (and 7 feet above!) the dock....thats another issue!
Regarding steerage; As long as a full keel boat is headed straight for her slip, wouldn't she be pretty much locked in (a strong cross current not withstanding)? I thought tracking is one of the advantages to a full keel. If not (and the boat actually needs the speed), I would certainly have nimble crew ready to perform the spring line trick on every approach. If a kid on the boardwalk had been watching us dock, it could have been ugly! Not to mention... it's no way to treat a lovely 60 year old boat.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 08-29-2011
L124C's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,387
Thanks: 48
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 7
L124C is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
I am from the school where no one ever gets off the boat until we have at least one spring line holding us against the dock, while applying idle power against it. No exceptions.
How do you rig the spring line so you can grab it quickly on approach? I know that some people hang them off pilings, but some docks (mine, for example) don't have pilings in the appropriate location.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 08-29-2011
CharlieCobra's Avatar
On the hard
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Bellingham, WA.
Posts: 3,503
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
CharlieCobra has a spectacular aura about CharlieCobra has a spectacular aura about
Never put oneself between inertia and mass.
__________________
Baggett and Sons Marine Restoration
The Landing at Colony Wharf
Bellingham, WA.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 08-29-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 563
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 14
sailordave is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
I teach folks how to dock yachts under sail. We use a stern breast line to stop the forward motion. Then get a centre line tie on ASAP.
If you have a cross wind or current pushing you off the dock, just get a centre line tie on. Then worry about getting the breast and spring lines on.
Breast line or Spring line?

B/c a SPRING line will stop a boat while allowing it to move fwd. A Breasting line is perpendicular to the hull and fwd motion will cause the boat to twist in the slip.
I used to dock a Hans Christian 43 Ketch (approx. 33000#) with just a single spring line. snub to a stop. idle fwd, lock the rudder w/ just a little port rudder and then walk around and tie off all four docklines. No fuss, no muss.
Your spring line should be the first line you put on. THAT IS YOUR BRAKE! Even if you have the engine jammed in gear you won't hit the dock head on; maybe scrape it, maybe spin in place and bang a piling but if you get the spring on you will not go fwd.

And yes, too many people come in too fast. As already noted, only if you have current/crosswind issues should you come in w/ speed on.
ottos likes this.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 08-29-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 8,951
Thanks: 10
Thanked 135 Times in 121 Posts
Rep Power: 6
Minnewaska will become famous soon enough Minnewaska will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by L124C View Post
How do you rig the spring line so you can grab it quickly on approach? I know that some people hang them off pilings, but some docks (mine, for example) don't have pilings in the appropriate location.
The easiest way it to have one left on the dock that is a different color from any other, so you can ask anyone who might be there to hand you the (red) line, or whatever color it is.

However, if no one is available, you take a long line and tie it off to the mid-ship cleat. Then take the line and make two small coils, one in each hand with about 4 feet of line between them, so that you can throw them over whatever you want to loop around on the dock. A cleat is great, but a piling, bollard, block or anything secure will do. Of course, when you throw the two coils, you must hold onto the untied bitter end so the line just loops over your target. You then pull the bitter end back to the appropriate length and tie right over top the first cleat hitch.

You never leave the boat and you have a line that runs from the boat to the dock and back to the boat. It is not a lasoo, you are only throwing a bunch of line behind whatever you want to catch and pull back against it. Takes about three practice tries for anyone to become a pro. Works every time.
ottos and RonRelyea like this.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Jeanneau 54DS

In the harsh marine environment, something is always in need of repair. Margaritas fix everything.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How slow is too slow before you use the motor? FarCry General Discussion (sailing related) 30 10-07-2008 01:09 PM
Sailnet is VERY VERY slow xort General Discussion (sailing related) 19 06-06-2008 10:48 AM
nor 'Sea 27... are they as slow as they look? starboardyacht Boat Review and Purchase Forum 10 02-10-2008 02:05 PM
Docking Jeffamc General Discussion (sailing related) 11 09-20-2003 09:05 AM
How to Slow Down and Stop John Rousmaniere Learning to Sail Articles 0 08-03-2003 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:48 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.