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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #41  
Old 09-02-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
I teach folks how to dock yachts under sail. We use a stern breast line to stop the forward motion. Then get a centre line tie on ASAP.

Under power we use a a method similar to the spring line approach. Before leaving the dock we find a spot to which we can attach a line that permits the boat to stay parallel to the dock when the transmission is in forward. I find the mid ship cleat is too far forward. When we come in, one person steps off (never jumps) and ties off opposite the transom. Then the transmission is engaged and you can take your time getting the lines attached. This a great method for a couple to use.

If you have a cross wind or current pushing you off the dock, just get a centre line tie on. Then worry about getting the breast and spring lines on.
I like that method, but find it more difficult in a centre cockpit.
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  #42  
Old 09-02-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xymotic View Post
My first boat broker gave me this advice: "If you think you are going too slow, SLOW DOWN!"

Also, never, ever do what the OP did and put your body in front of a moving boat
It take a lot of training to just let it go and not try to save it.

A) You can't save it.
b) You'll have a broken boat AND a broken body
and I would add
c) don't jump off the boat as the OP did
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  #43  
Old 09-02-2011
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I definitely think "aggressive" is the wrong word, but I understand the sentiment. The most stressful part of both docking and undocking for me is the part when I'm not going fast enough to steer. If I am not steering the boat, then the wind is steering it.
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  #44  
Old 09-02-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canadianseamonkey View Post
I like that method, but find it more difficult in a centre cockpit.
I've generally found centre cockpit boats easier to dock than the aft cockpit boats I grew up with, as long as one doesn't load them up with canvas. Stern and midships are directly to hand. YMMV.
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Old 09-02-2011
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As slow as "practicable" (as conditions dictate) is the right speed. That way, as most have pointed out, if things go to h***, you have the highest probability of managing things. But...when wind and current require that you crab, your speed has to be high enough to allow you to crab into the slip without too much crabbing. That speed gets higher the greater wind and current are. So minimum steerage is not always the right answer.

And, as noted above, if the wind and current are too strong for your skills (most don't practice in these conditions), it may be time to go lie to an anchor or a mooring for a while, as someone noted above, to reduce that EQ that was mentioned. Sasparilla can taste just as good at anchor as at a slip.
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Old 09-03-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
I agree. I back into my off-side slip so I have to enter the fairway in reverse. If I'm not lined up and going at least 2 kts I have no steerage at all. The damage to other boats would be considerable -- 11 tons going 1/2 kt still carries a significant impact.

With enough energy I slide the boat straight into the slip. If I have a mechanical failure at the last minute I won't damage anything except my own boat.
What is an "off side slip", and why do you need to back into it? I certainly agree about the potential for significant impact, having just witnessed it up close!

Last edited by L124C; 09-03-2011 at 03:27 AM.
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Old 09-03-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fryewe View Post
As slow as "practicable" (as conditions dictate) is the right speed. That way, as most have pointed out, if things go to h***, you have the highest probability of managing things. But...when wind and current require that you crab, your speed has to be high enough to allow you to crab into the slip without too much crabbing. That speed gets higher the greater wind and current are. So minimum steerage is not always the right answer. And, as noted above, if the wind and current are too strong for your skills (most don't practice in these conditions), it may be time to go lie to an anchor or a mooring for a while, as someone noted above, to reduce that EQ that was mentioned. Sasparilla can taste just as good at anchor as at a slip.
Well said. All of the dock crashes I have witnessed (which prompted this thread) have not involved much wind, current or anything tricky, just speed (relatively speaking!).
I never did get a answer to my earlier question regarding how full keel boats dock. I know they don't turn well under power, but don't they track like freight trains once you get them pointed in the right direction, i,e,. the slip?
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Old 09-03-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L124C View Post
Well said. All of the dock crashes I have witnessed (which prompted this thread) have not involved much wind, current or anything tricky, just speed (relatively speaking!).
I never did get a answer to my earlier question regarding how full keel boats dock. I know they don't turn well under power, but don't they track like freight trains once you get them pointed in the right direction, i,e,. the slip?
I dunno about others, but my former boat: a pearson 424 had an offset prop, and it would turn (prop walk) rather sharply to the right in reverse.

Sometimes, this was very advantageous, you could come in and throw it in rev and it would snug right up to the dock.

Other times it was a P.I.T.A. It would make it VERY hard to back out of a slip and turn the other way. the solution was a short burst of MASSIVE power, then nothing letting the rudder steer and then forward to offset. rinse/repeat.
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Old 09-03-2011
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No wake!

I live aboard and often times other boat come flying down the fairway shaking my boat with their wake. Most often when you are docking you are in a "No Wake" zone. There is a good reason for that. Other boats entering and/or leaving post a serious threat to speeders. I have seen more accidents in the fairways and slips by far than I have seen on the bays and open ocean. Sometimes foolish kayaking enthusiasts, paddle boarders, and people in dinghys also lurk there. Just a few more things to keep in mind when docking.
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I don't have a full keel boat, but I do have the next best thing for tracking...a full keel with a cutaway forefoot. It tracks pretty well, but the bow gets blown around a good bit when at low speed coming into a slip with a brisk cross-breeze . And I have to take her out of a slip pretty smartly with a cross-breeze to keep the bow from blowing 'round before I get clear. I have a good size dog house and more freeboard than a lot of boats of my length (Norsea 27), so a cross wind is a considerable factor when maneuvering in tight quarters.
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