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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #51  
Old 09-03-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L124C View Post
What is an "off side slip", and why do you need to back into it? I certainly agree about the potential for significant impact, having just witnessed it up close!
Sorry - local vocabulary I guess. By "off side slip" I mean one in which when heading down the fairway prop walk works against you trying to back into the slip. In my case with prop walk to the left that means slips on the right of the fairway facing in. The fairway isn't wide enough to head in and turn around before backing in.

I back in because the finger is very short and my electrical connections are far aft. Backed in I can snug the starboard quarter up to the finger right at the lifeline gates and get on and off easily, especially with provisions and gear. Head in, access to the boat would be quite a challenge.
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  #52  
Old 09-07-2011
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Rule # 1 or #2??

Mine is less than 1kt, 1/2kt best, as bow passes slip end...

PS
if folks are having to step off at your home dock in order to dock your boat you are NOT set up correctly.
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  #53  
Old 09-07-2011
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Originally Posted by rtbates View Post
PS
if folks are having to step off at your home dock in order to dock your boat you are NOT set up correctly.
Not necessarily. I keep my home docklines on the dock and step off to grab them once the boat is in position and stopped. However, I do have fingers on both sides and only a foot or so of clearance so once the boat is in position it's not going anywhere. I just step off, throw the lines over the cleats, and done. No adjusting needed. I keep a spare set of docking lines stowed on the boat in case I want to dock elsewhere (like at the bar).
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  #54  
Old 09-12-2011
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Well sorry to throw a spanner in the works so to speak I personally feel you are stating texted book methods of berthing procedures. Not the all-weather versions that should be mastered.
Let me try and explain with a current situation after several days on being marooned in my bolt hole from the relentless howling gales I did the opposite of what the texted books say! The secret is MASTER YOUR boats control like you learn to master your car or truck.
I waited for the gales to calm they did not my yacht (see pictures) was taking a real thrashing either the fenders popped out or they got squashed flat it is the backlash of hurricane currently hitting the UK I planned to move round to the opposite side of the sea based mooring pontoon even though the wind was against me and the tide too. Using confetti sized paper I got the tidal drift at about two knots the wind was a constant force six with gusts up to force nine. Carefully I laid my warps in to slips started the engine and left the pontoon on the opposite side I circled several times again finding the waters flow rate and the wind now pushing me away. With a centre cleated warp and bow and stern ones lead to deck within my reach I went in to berth centre warp cleat attached instantly stern within a moment then out the boat with the long bow line to finish the mooring. Attached two springs and a total of six mooring warps I now had a perfectly sitting yacht not being forced on the pontoon and fenders not even touching the hard as the gales held off the boat
RE: Using a fender to slow down your boat…. I did not use any fenders to bump the pontoon to slow me down I used reverse that’s what it is therefore those using a fender to slow down the boat should ask themselves would you ram a car to slow it down? Of course not you would brake, on your boat reverse is used to slow down the boat.
Master your technique with practise you can get your vessel in and out of any situation a typical marina will always have somebody on the poor side of the wind or tide. Once mastered you can use the vessel anytime of the year not just in the boating season hope this is not offended anyone it’s just my personal experience, I felt it should be shared with the forum members.

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Last edited by Thestar; 09-12-2011 at 01:34 PM. Reason: Add picture
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  #55  
Old 09-12-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thestar View Post
RE: Using a fender to slow down your boat…. I did not use any fenders to bump the pontoon to slow me down I used reverse that’s what it is therefore those using a fender to slow down the boat should ask themselves would you ram a car to slow it down? Of course not you would brake, on your boat reverse is used to slow down the boat.
I try not to tell people what to do. My position/experience/skill set is different from theirs (gotta' walk a mile in their shoes). I will share what I do, and what works for me. Learn from my experience, or not. Your call...

What I do is; I bump the fender, AND use reverse, and neutral, to slow/stop my boat in the slip. It works for me. Because my crew members are of various levels of experience, I need to compensate for them (some more than others).

BTW - Using reverse to slow your car will get expensive.
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  #56  
Old 09-12-2011
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Pivoting on a fender can be text book procedure to arrive or depart. The primary plan, however, should be to stop without one IMHO. Nevertheless, they are there for a reason.
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  #57  
Old 09-13-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eherlihy View Post
I try not to tell people what to do. My position/experience/skill set is different from theirs (gotta' walk a mile in their shoes). I will share what I do, and what works for me. Learn from my experience, or not. Your call...
The fact that you purchased a boat a year ago and are now a "Skipper" certainly gives you the right to do what you want with your boat. No one is "telling" you what to do with your boat. Several more experienced Skippers have simply stated their opinion that regularly hitting fenders to slow down is a bad plan, and have explained why. Learn from our experience, or not. Your call.

What I do is; I bump the fender, AND use reverse, and neutral, to slow/stop my boat in the slip. It works for me. Because my crew members are of various levels of experience, I need to compensate for them (some more than others).
If I have "crew" I can't rely on (I call them passengers), I dock as if I'm single handing. I still don't aim for the fenders.

BTW - Using reverse to slow your car will get expensive.
IMO, driving a boat as if it was a car is exactly what gets many Skippers in trouble (i.e., turning towards the slip too early with a head wind). Stating what should be obvious; a car has brakes, and travels on a solid (non-giving) surface. If you need to put it in reverse to slow it, something has gone seriously wrong, and "expense" is probably the LEAST of your worries!
A boat on the other hand, has no brakes and travels in a liquid medium. Therefore, no harm is done when the motor is put into reverse at low RPM, while the vessel is traveling forward. For me, aiming for the fenders would be the last resort to slow the boat, as the equivalent would be in a car.
To quote Rumi:
"Sell your cleverness - purchase bewilderment"
Not telling. Just saying there is a lot of experience and knowledge on this forum for the taking. I honestly believe I'm a better Skipper because of it.

Last edited by L124C; 09-13-2011 at 03:53 PM.
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  #58  
Old 09-13-2011
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Originally Posted by Heinous View Post
Not necessarily. I keep my home docklines on the dock and step off to grab them once the boat is in position and stopped. However, I do have fingers on both sides and only a foot or so of clearance so once the boat is in position it's not going anywhere. I just step off, throw the lines over the cleats, and done. No adjusting needed. I keep a spare set of docking lines stowed on the boat in case I want to dock elsewhere (like at the bar).
I do the same, and I have a single finger dock. Though, I "step" off after putting her in reverse and walk to the bow to put bow lines on. She slows, then backs up when she gets to the front dock, and the bow lines tighten, she's not going anywhere. Works well for me. I know....NEVER get off a moving boat! I'm a bad man! Maybe I should take my own advice and listen to Rumi! Well... If it ever stops working there will be a funny sorry behind it. You'll read it here first!*
I should mention that when single handing, I have a single control line that runs from Bow to Stearn on the dock side to the boat. It's long enough to tie to two dock cleats. Don't usually need it at my dock, but if I did, it's there. I do use it at guest docks.
*This issue prompted me to start this thread. http://www.sailnet.com/forums/seaman...tml#post774173

Last edited by L124C; 09-13-2011 at 05:15 PM.
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  #59  
Old 09-13-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L124C View Post
I do the same, and I have a single finger dock. Though, I "step" off after putting her in reverse and walk to the bow to put bow lines on. She slows, then backs up when she gets to the front dock, and the bow lines tighten, she's not going anywhere. Works well for me. I know....NEVER get off a moving boat! I'm a bad man! Maybe I should take my own advice and listen to Rumi! Well... If it ever stops working there will be a funny sorry behind it. You'll read it here first!
You're doing worse than getting off a moving boat, you're getting off a moving boat in gear going the other way.

There are so many ways for that to go wrong I can't even begin to count them. And ALL of them can be fixed with slow down when docking
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  #60  
Old 01-15-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xymotic View Post
You're doing worse than getting off a moving boat, you're getting off a moving boat in gear going the other way.
There are so many ways for that to go wrong I can't even begin to count them. And ALL of them can be fixed with slow down when docking
Yeah...a 16 horsepower Yanmar in a 4 Ton boat idling in reverse could rip the cleats right out of the dock!
I DO approach as slowly as possible (I am the OP to this thread titled "Slow down when docking" BTW!).
If you really read the post you quoted, you would see the boat is still moving forward when I step off. The reverse prop provides a little braking action, then eventually, some resistance to the bow line, keeping the boat against the dock (and not my neighbor) until I get the other lines on.
You will be shocked to know that when I single hand, I put the boat in reverse, and walk it out of the slip, holding the shrouds, and stepping aboard as I approach the end of the dock.
Could I trip on the dock and be knocked unconscious, allowing the boat to slowly idle across the Fairway coming to rest against whatever it contacts? Sure. However, it is highly unlikely. That's the worst case scenario, and given all the things that COULD happen to me while sailing, is the least of my worries!

Last edited by L124C; 01-15-2012 at 05:44 PM.
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