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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #11  
Old 11-08-2011
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When I heave-to in my C22 I am able to do so with only the main. I sheet the main in tight and give the boom vang a tug and I'm able to fore-reach with ease.
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Old 11-08-2011
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A video of Larry Pardey's ideas/experiences on the subject:

jorapazu, StormBay and casey1999 like this.
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Last edited by SlowButSteady; 11-08-2011 at 03:25 AM.
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  #13  
Old 01-04-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
So here I am heaving to. Catalina 25, 15 to 20 knots, Genoa rolled up about 5 feet.

The boat was perfectly balanced making about 3 knots,
If you are moving forward -- out of the slick created by your own leeway -- then you are not hove-to.
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Old 01-04-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blowinstink View Post
If you are moving forward -- out of the slick created by your own leeway -- then you are not hove-to.
This may be why the Pardey's use a sea anchor (on a snatch block led to an aft cleat or winch) to control the angle of the boat to the wind. It's been awhile since I read their book.

Regards,
Brad
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Old 01-05-2012
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+1 on The Pardey's book. From what I've read, boats vary considerably in their ability to heave-to. Most important for planning is knowing how much leeway your boat will make when hove-to; the less the better. Getting offshore far enough to avoid being forced ashore in a blow is a major consideration when plotting courses. It's why hugging the shore is not an awfully good idea.

The best place for a genoa if there is any chance of needing to heave-to is down in the sail locker. At the time you need to back the jib there should be either the heavy 100% working jib or a storm jib in place. I don't have a storm jib but find the working jib with a few turns on the roller is sufficient because it is rugged, has it's own inboard blocks, and is small enough to back it without fouling anything.
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Old 01-05-2012
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If you are hove to and still making forward progress, you are not properly hove to and in really bad conditions you place both you and your crew in serious danger. Lin and Larry Pardy's book will clearly show you how, why and when to heave to, and they clearly demonstrate the various techniques that can be used with various styles of sailing vessels. It's a must have book for anyone who seriously contemplates sailing, even in relatively sheltered waters such as Chesapeake, Delaware and San Francisco bays.

Essentially, if the vessel is making forward progress, you are moving out of the protective slick created by the hull, thereby exposing the bow to knockdown waves. Same holds true if your drift is backwards, which would expose your stern quarter to a wave washing into the cockpit.

As for loss of distance toward your destination, the side drift, when properly hove to is usually less than 1 knot, and with an 8-foot diameter sea anchor, it can be as little as .1 to .3 knots in winds of 50 knots. Essentially the boat is sitting nearly dead still while you await the storm to pass. Just how long you must wait depends solely upon the size and nature of the storm itself.

For example, most regional storms usually do not last more than 24 hours. They tend to be relatively fast moving, therefore if you are hove to for the duration, and with a drift of .1 knots, your total, sideways movement will be approximately 2.4 nautical miles during the hove to period. Consequently, if you have sufficient sea room you could actually be hove to for days without drifting very far at all.

Of course, the best thing a sailor can do is try to avoid storms, but this is not always possible. The actual amount to time most spend in a storm amounts to less than 1-percent of our total sailing time. However, when you encounter than 1-percent storm, if you're not prepared it can be a life threatening experience that you'll never forget. And, in some instances, that once a year storm could end up being fatal for you and your crew. Therefore, I would suggest first purchasing the book, or better yet, purchase the combination video and book. You can take a quick glimpse of the video preview at storm tactics - Yahoo! Search Results

Good luck,

Gary
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Old 01-05-2012
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Reading Storm Tactics convinced me to buy a good sea anchor but I have never deployed it, even to practice. Has anyone out there actually used one of these in a storm? I've rigged up all the gear, have watched/memorized the nice video instructions that came with it and keep it with a large detailed step-by-step printed set of procedures attached to the bag but as with any piece of equipment, I really need to get out and test it. Without using it in actual situations, I really have no data on leeway with it deployed and that is the essential number needed when deciding whether to use it.
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Old 01-05-2012
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The book, which I havn`t read, is Storm Tactics, Cape Horn Tested. But I do have the DVD which is great information and fun to watch too. Highly recommended.
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Old 01-05-2012
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I sail a C25 and heaving to works best for me with the genny completely furled, the main in tight, boom centered. I like this method better because it saves wear and tear on the head sail and the boat stands straighter. I've done this with the main reefed with the same results.
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Old 01-05-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c25novi View Post
I sail a C25 and heaving to works best for me with the genny completely furled, the main in tight, boom centered. I like this method better because it saves wear and tear on the head sail and the boat stands straighter. I've done this with the main reefed with the same results.
But where's the rudder? Hard to leeward? Hard to windward? Centered? Somewhere in between?

Curtis
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