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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #21  
Old 11-22-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brokesailor View Post
Ok I think I have the greatest post ever. I was talking to the Captain of the Hinckley 48 Yawl that was caught in the storm Sean trying to take his boat to Saint Martin. He is now safely in Moorehead City, NC.

In the thick of things with 50-60 kt winds, having been knocked down one of his crew took the Epirb and locked himself in the v-bertn. The Captain talked him into opening the door and the crew wanted to set off the epirb. The Captain was trying to talk the crew into handing over the Epirb. The only way he got him to hand it over was under the promise he would set it off which he did. A C-130 later met them and he told them they were OK so they flew off.

What would you do in a situation like this with a panicked crew?
I think I would have broken the door down and given the crew member a spanking. I would not have set off the e-pirb.
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  #22  
Old 11-22-2011
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Roller furling jib

I have wondered about the safety of a roller furling jib in heavy weather. At a minimum, you have greater windage and weight aloft and if it begins to unfurl, you can have a serious problem on your hands.
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  #23  
Old 11-22-2011
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Originally Posted by jameswilson29 View Post
I have wondered about the safety of a roller furling jib in heavy weather. At a minimum, you have greater windage and weight aloft and if it begins to unfurl, you can have a serious problem on your hands.
I have thought about this also. If it happens, you will just need to deal with it. I think the roller safety aspects out weigh a hank on jib safety issues in heavy seas. I think you just need to pick the worse of two evils. Seeing all single handed non stop round the world racing sailors use rollers says a lot for their safety. I think if maintained well, they have excellant reliability record. I would not give up my roller for a hank on. I think I can deal with any failure of the systems that I might encounter. Although I would like to add an inner forestay that I can use with a hank on jib if the roller fails me.

Last edited by casey1999; 11-22-2011 at 03:34 PM.
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  #24  
Old 11-22-2011
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Back to the OP...manually setting off an EPIRB is the same as calling a MAYDAY. If you recall your VHF radio training, a MAYDAY is only called when there is immediate danger of losing the vessel (i.e. sinking) or immediate risk of loss of life (eg MOB). You are not supposed to call a MAYDAY or trip an EPIRP because "I have had enough and I want to go home now". The only way you want to abandon your vessel at sea is by stepping UP into the liferaft.
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Old 11-22-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruiser2B View Post
it is tough to say, but there have been alot of posts lately about abandoning boats and crew wanting to get off when the going gets rough. I read and think about what I would do.......So far all I can come up with is as captain you must set very clear guidelines as to who is in charge and explain why before ever leaving the dock with crew you are unfamiliar with or just pick your crew more carefully. I have been hit/stuck in a few unexpected storms...luckily just t-storms on the bay and am fortunate enough to have crew aboard that understood how and why they had to listen to what i needed done and/or wanted. I think it would be very hard for me to go offshore with crew,as the captain of a vessel, that i did not know, trust and obeyed my word when handling the boat.

With that said, I have many years of navy experience and have been trained in damage control. We practiced as we "fight" so to speak and as a repair party team member I had complete faith in our team captain to make the correct decisions were being made. I think all to often inrxperienced sailors go to sea and never expect or prepare(train or even discuss) for the unexpected. however I cannot comment on this particular case.

I think as someone who is willing to set off and EPIRB or call in a MAYDAY has to understand that first and foremost is without doubt 100% absolutely necessary. Once that call is made you have now just put several addition peoples lives in danger to come get you....so it better be because you actually need it!

my .02 ....worth even less!
Well, in Clark Gable movies, all he had to do was give the panicker a couple of sharp slaps.
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  #26  
Old 11-22-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by casey1999 View Post
I think the roller safety aspects out weigh a hank on jib safety issues in heavy seas.
Not sure about that. Assuming you reef at the proper time, it shouldn't make a difference whether you've got roller or hank-on headsails. And once the proper time has past, if you're planning on rolling up the jib instead of taking it down, now you have the weight/windage/unwinding problems to potentially deal with.

Hank-on fans might say that the ease of maintenance of a hank-on system outweighs the roller system's benefits
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  #27  
Old 11-22-2011
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Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
Sounds like a design problem. Anyone hear of this before?

Is there a preemptive step that can be taken to prevent this.

If it wasn't for this problem it would have just been a rough crossing.
That sounds to me like equipment failure, not a design problem. Hit anything hard enough and the right way, and it will break. I can't think of anything preemptive that you could do to keep this from happening, only what you could do to mitigate the effects once it does. The first thing that comes to mind is keeping a bung attached to the thru hull fitting for immediate use in case of failure.
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  #28  
Old 11-22-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamLein View Post
Not sure about that. Assuming you reef at the proper time, it shouldn't make a difference whether you've got roller or hank-on headsails. And once the proper time has past, if you're planning on rolling up the jib instead of taking it down, now you have the weight/windage/unwinding problems to potentially deal with.

Hank-on fans might say that the ease of maintenance of a hank-on system outweighs the roller system's benefits
The more time I can stay off the bow the safer I am, especially in a blow while single handing. I regularly roll my furler in 35 knots of wind with no effort. Would not want to be on the bow changing sails with a hank on jib in that situation. To stay safe, I try to minimize risk, and one way is to minimize time spent in a potential dangerous situation, and the roller allows me to do that. It may fail at some point, but for me, dealing with its failure would be the same as hanking and raising (or taking down) a jib alone in 35 knot winds. As far as maintenance goes, I rather have a hank on, that would also allow me to do more inspections of the forestay, but overall, I will stay with the roller. BTW hank ons have problems too, once was raising a storm jib on an 85 foot boat and have the tack break, sail went all the way to the top of the mast. We had to use a winch to get her down. That was in 45 knots of wind. The capt of that boat is going to install a roller after sailing with hanks for the last 20 years.

Last edited by casey1999; 11-22-2011 at 04:58 PM.
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  #29  
Old 11-26-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
Sounds like a design problem. Anyone hear of this before?

Is there a preemptive step that can be taken to prevent this.

If it wasn't for this problem it would have just been a rough crossing.
Exactly. I have one of those damned things, 70s vintage. Every time I look at that plastic gizmo in the bottom of my boat, it gives me the willies! Going to plug it up permanently. With GPS, these are pretty much obsolete. If I ever need a mechanical knot reading, will use the old knot tube (or a knotted line:-)
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  #30  
Old 11-26-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smurphny View Post
Exactly. I have one of those damned things, 70s vintage. Every time I look at that plastic gizmo in the bottom of my boat, it gives me the willies! Going to plug it up permanently. With GPS, these are pretty much obsolete. If I ever need a mechanical knot reading, will use the old knot tube (or a knotted line:-)
The nice thing about a mechanical speed sensor is that one can see the effect of current on the boat.

GPS give a great SOG, yet.... there is no information about current.....
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