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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #31  
Old 11-26-2011
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Any thru-hull has the potential to pop if she gets slammed that hard. Don't see it as a "design flaw", just a bad weather flaw. Good video too; shows a calm crew and captain and that's what it takes.....along with some luck.

To the OP, it really all depends on the relationship to the crew, as to how I would handle it. There's a lot to be said either way so it's hard to either condemn or praise with the given information. At the end, they made it where they were going safe, that's really all that matters.
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  #32  
Old 12-05-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brokesailor View Post
Ok I think I have the greatest post ever. I was talking to the Captain of the Hinckley 48 Yawl that was caught in the storm Sean trying to take his boat to Saint Martin. He is now safely in Moorehead City, NC.

In the thick of things with 50-60 kt winds, having been knocked down one of his crew took the Epirb and locked himself in the v-bertn. The Captain talked him into opening the door and the crew wanted to set off the epirb. The Captain was trying to talk the crew into handing over the Epirb. The only way he got him to hand it over was under the promise he would set it off which he did. A C-130 later met them and he told them they were OK so they flew off.

What would you do in a situation like this with a panicked crew?


It seems there is a direct correlation between fishin' stories and sailin' stories. At least it opened a good line of comment for the forum.

Here's how it actually went down. (Not as exciting though)
We had been knocked down twice ,and capsized, in a short period of time.
One crew was injured. It was pretty evident that it was only going to get worse.
The skipper was disconnecting/reinstalling/reconnecting the boat batteries that had been hanging from their wires when we were capsized and were now in a tangle on the salon floor. His knowledge of his boat allowed him to do this quickly. (Note to self: ALWAYS strap those suckers down when offshore.)
A crewmember was helping do this.


Crewmember "You know, this is about the time people usually pop their epirb."
Skipper "You think we should?"
Crew "It seems like the thing to do"
Skipper "OK then, go ahead."
Crew "How do you do it?"
Skipper shows Crew how to activate the epirb and instructs him to activate the second one stored in the forward head.
Skipper tells the Crew to place the epirb in the cockpit so it will have a clear view of the sky.
Helmsman is advised of this action and activates his personal unit.

Two hours later the vessel is miraculously stabilized with two drogues out, sailing barepoled but no longer surfing down the waves. The skipper's knowledge of heavy weather sailing, and the fact that he had the right heavy weather equipment on board saved the boat. A coast guard C130 flys by, ascertains the vessel is making out ok, and advises the name and location of a nearby vessel that can assist if needed. The C130 also tells us to turn off the epirbs. Till then I don't think anyone on the boat knew you could turn them off.
The C130 then proceeds to contact another nearby sailing vessel to check on them.

So, there was no panic by anyone. The skipper authorized the epirb activation, and had two hours to cancel the unit from transmitting. Nobody locked themselves in a cabin. All 3 men on the boat were too busy keeping her afloat.

Not as interesting or controversial, but true nonetheless.
I was there.
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  #33  
Old 12-05-2011
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Thanks for the "rest of the story".
Regards
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  #34  
Old 12-05-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mstern View Post
That sounds to me like equipment failure, not a design problem. Hit anything hard enough and the right way, and it will break. I can't think of anything preemptive that you could do to keep this from happening, only what you could do to mitigate the effects once it does. The first thing that comes to mind is keeping a bung attached to the thru hull fitting for immediate use in case of failure.
That makes sense if you are hitting it with a hammer but hitting something on the bottom of the hull that is only a couple inches in diameter with a wave and it pops out. It sounds like something was wrong unless there was a 2x4 in that wave which there may have been.
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  #35  
Old 12-06-2011
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Originally Posted by h20man View Post
The nice thing about a mechanical speed sensor is that one can see the effect of current on the boat.

GPS give a great SOG, yet.... there is no information about current.....
I also have an old knot meter tube gizmo that could be used if the electronics went out. A 1 1/2" hole can easily sink a boat quickly, especially being single-handed with no one below to get their feet wet when the floorboards start floating
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Old 12-06-2011
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I found this: NTech USA - Speedwatch Wireless Knotmeter
No need for hole in hull.

Now that I'm thinking about this I was on a boat coming back from Bermuda that was getting slammed pretty hard and the knot meter popped off. They just had to pop it back on but it was a scare.

Maybe this is not too uncommon.

Last edited by davidpm; 12-07-2011 at 12:01 AM.
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  #37  
Old 12-07-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
I found this: NTech USA - Speedwatch Wireless Knotmeter
No need for hole in hull.

Now that I'm thinking about this I was on a boat coming back from Bermuda that was getting slammed pretty hard and the knot meter popped off. They just had to pop it back on but it was a scare.

Maybe this is not too uncommon.
That is a really nice little unit. I have a Polar bike watch that looks suspiciously similar and also is wireless. Am wondering if the Speedwatch sending unit could be used with the watch.

That's pretty scary that you had the same experience with one of these things popping out! They were pretty much standard equipment on boats of late 60s/70s vintage. When you look at the "plug," it's held in by a only a small pin going into plastic. I think I'm going to see if I can perhaps design a backup method of securing the plug to stop it from coming out completely if the pin ever fails. If not, it's getting permanently glued in with epoxy. It's too old to ever get a replacement anyway.
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  #38  
Old 12-07-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smurphny View Post
That is a really nice little unit. I have a Polar bike watch that looks suspiciously similar and also is wireless. Am wondering if the Speedwatch sending unit could be used with the watch.

That's pretty scary that you had the same experience with one of these things popping out! They were pretty much standard equipment on boats of late 60s/70s vintage. When you look at the "plug," it's held in by a only a small pin going into plastic. I think I'm going to see if I can perhaps design a backup method of securing the plug to stop it from coming out completely if the pin ever fails. If not, it's getting permanently glued in with epoxy. It's too old to ever get a replacement anyway.
I've got one of those through hull knot meter senders also. Next haul out I'm pulling it all out and glass the hole over.
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  #39  
Old 12-07-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smurphny View Post
That is a really nice little unit. I have a Polar bike watch that looks suspiciously similar and also is wireless. Am wondering if the Speedwatch sending unit could be used with the watch.

That's pretty scary that you had the same experience with one of these things popping out! They were pretty much standard equipment on boats of late 60s/70s vintage. When you look at the "plug," it's held in by a only a small pin going into plastic. I think I'm going to see if I can perhaps design a backup method of securing the plug to stop it from coming out completely if the pin ever fails. If not, it's getting permanently glued in with epoxy. It's too old to ever get a replacement anyway.
I've seen good reviews of this, and nothing to mount, apparently works by highly accurate/ updated gps.
Velocitek Speedpuck Speed Puck W/O Speedplay - SPEEDPUCK - BoatersWorld.com
http://www.sailingproshop.com/Produc...Puck__VSP.aspx
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  #40  
Old 12-07-2011
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Have a couple of GPS units that read out speed over ground. The difference with the more mechanical units such as the old one is that they measure speed through water and are really backups in case you need to go to DR navigation, calculating offsets for current and wind to get a course made good and actually reading a compass. DR instruments make me remember the days of, "Geez, what buoy is that!
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