Jack lines and tethers - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
 Not a Member? 

Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Like Tree4Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 12-02-2011
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Arlington VA
Posts: 65
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 5
meteuz is on a distinguished road
I wonder if the method of "skydiving" to an aft ladder implicitly assumes that the seas will be relatively calm. Considering that a a fall is more likely in less then ideal conditions, I think I would rather go with a system that keeps the crew in the boat, even if it is a bit more cumbersome.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 12-02-2011
jameswilson29's Avatar
Senior Smart Aleck
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 2,036
Thanks: 26
Thanked 64 Times in 59 Posts
Rep Power: 6
jameswilson29 is on a distinguished road
Allowing yourself enough tether to maneuver helps you to perform the functions of sailing and to avoid falling overboard in the first place.

I find it difficult to imagine creating a tether short enough to prevent one from at least going over the lifelines and hitting the topsides while still allowing the person to actually perform necessary, useful functions on the boat. Sure, you can clip yourself tightly to the boat, but then what can you do, except stay in the cockpit?

In any event, whatever system you use, you should practice your MOB drills so you know they work. When you are trying to maneuver forward of the mast in difficult conditions, fear is the enemy. If you are cautious, but secure that you will not become separated from the boat, you can more easily stay onboard and perform the necessary functions you need to perform.

Last edited by jameswilson29; 12-02-2011 at 10:11 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 12-02-2011
PCP's Avatar
PCP PCP is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal, West Coast
Posts: 16,162
Thanks: 21
Thanked 95 Times in 79 Posts
Rep Power: 10
PCP will become famous soon enough
Be careful with those experiences

Some years ago while we were making a passage and the boat was sailing slowly (3.5/4K) I decided to do that with my 6 year old boy and let him go with a rescue boy on a long line. We started to pull him till the moment he saw he was crying. I cut lose the line, turn way and pick the boy. The pressure in his body has hurting him.

I saw once 3 big guys recovering a crew member that went overboard on the back of the boat. The boat should not be making more than 6k and the force that they were making was so big that the guy lost the shoes, the trousers, well, everything

I remember to hear about an horrible story between two brothers on a boat. One fell overboard and was tied by tether. He drown while the brother tried for several minutes to put him on board.

It is difficult to stop a sailing boat specially if it goes downwind and the crew is small or if it is a guy with its wife and she does not know much about sailing.

I suggest that if the one in the water is conscious and the crew is small the best thing would be to tie a long line to the harness, cut the tether, let the guy go and recover it by the stern calmly, using the stern ladder.

Regards

Paulo

Last edited by PCP; 12-02-2011 at 11:20 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 12-02-2011
jameswilson29's Avatar
Senior Smart Aleck
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 2,036
Thanks: 26
Thanked 64 Times in 59 Posts
Rep Power: 6
jameswilson29 is on a distinguished road
I agree - one should first practice in relatively calm waters and slow speed.

The trick is to use the water force to rise up on top of the water - like a surfer or waterskier, not to be dragged through the water with your head down.

We did it for fun, not as a safety drill, but in the process we learned how to be dragged and how to maneuver while being pulled through the water by a chest harness. Jump off the rear quarter so you do not destroy the lifelines in the process. Once you learn how to drag in calmer conditions, the faster speed actually makes it easier to rise out of the water (and it is actually fun).

The key to proficiency in anything is practice and you cannot expect to handle a situation well if you have never experienced it. I am not advocating everyone to use a stretchy jackline and a long tether, but if you are reasonably fit, can remain calm or have fun with it, and practice maneuvering, it is one approach to working freely and safely with a harness on.

If, on the other hand, you are not fit, or you panic in new situations, or try to grab the tether, or you do not understand the physics of it, then you are asking for trouble, and you should either stay in the cockpit, or maneuver slowly on a short tether.

I also believe you should practice all the maneuvers you may have to perform if all comfort and convenience systems fail in the worst weather, so you should be skilled at maneuvering around the mast and foredeck using handholds and be able to handle your sails yourself without any help in difficult conditions (if you stick with hank-on jibs and halyards at the mast as we poor/frugal/old school/purist sailors do, or if you have spent some time racing as foredeck crew/bowman, you necessarily gain a lot of practice at these maneuvers in less-than-ideal conditions).

Last edited by jameswilson29; 12-02-2011 at 11:35 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 12-02-2011
celenoglu's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 544
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
celenoglu is on a distinguished road
Jacklines should be well away from the sides of the boat. They are intended to keep you on the boat, not to drag you in water. If you fall in the soup, it is best to cut the line. Make sure your safety line keeps you on the boat if you loose your control.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 12-02-2011
AdamLein's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Coquitlam, BC
Posts: 1,866
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
AdamLein will become famous soon enough
I agree that a tether should not encumber your work on the boat. I have experimented with a variety of ways of attaching the jackline:

1 - along the cabin top, inside the shrouds, which meet the side decks fairly close to the cabin top. This keeps me comparatively inboard but more often than not, the carabiner on the jackline end of the tether snags something, especially often getting wedged in between the cabin top and a shroud. However if I do go over I might not necessarily end up with my face in the water.

2 - along the side decks, outside the shrouds. This is pretty good but means I have to make use of the very narrow side-decks on my boat to move around. In fact, this is normally a very comfortable way to go forward, but with a slippery sloping deck in rough weather it's obviously an added danger. It also means that if I want to unclip and clip to something else I have to lean over the side decks, bringing my weight too far outboard for safety. And of course lastly it means that if I go over, I'm definitely in the water.

3 - Single jackline, one end tied to each bow cleat, and looping abaft the mast with a good amount of slack. Tried this recently during a two-day singlehanded race, and really liked it. I could go from one side of the boat to the other without unclipping. I could stay clipped on in the cockpit and reach most of the things I needed to. The thing I haven't figured out yet is how tight the loop should be. Too tight and prevents me from working in the cockpit without unclipping, and might be hard to reach from the cockpit to (un)cilp. Too loose and it tends to drag around and might not keep me on the boat.

I think what I'd like to try next is the same as (3) but without much slack, plus a tether permanently clipped to something else that gives me access to the cockpit. Put on the new tether before taking the old one off to switch from cockpit to deck or back.
__________________
s/v Essorant
1972 Catalina 27
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 12-02-2011
St Anna's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Southern QLD, Bayside
Posts: 1,428
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 12
St Anna is on a distinguished road
I would certainly agree wholeheartedly with what the guys above have written. Their experience shows.

I would only add that I am always looking at improving this system. Currently I do not like long jacklines. If you have 20'-30' of jackline where a wave can bowl you over, you can slide along until you reach the end of your tether. 20+' is a long distance and will hurt or break something.

I use a short jackline to the mast on either side. I have another short set from mast to bow and a third from cockpit to stern. I am used to having 2 tethers and clip next on before unclipping first if I need to go right up the bow.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 12-02-2011
rdw rdw is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 35
Thanks: 4
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
rdw is on a distinguished road
I am not well educated enough to know exactly why but form what I have read you do not want your jacklines "as tight as possible". Tehre is some physics involved that reduces the breaking load. That is all I know.
RDW
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 12-02-2011
Barquito's Avatar
Barquito
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,931
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Barquito is on a distinguished road
Here is my uneducated deduction:

1) In situations where if you fall off you will die; use harness.
2) The most likely situation where you would fall off and die is when alone on deck (in any weather), far enough off shore that you cannot swim to shore.

Therefore, the safest set-up is a short tether, on a tight jackline. If the jackline is too loose, it will sag far enough that you will go over the side. If you fall far enough that the tight jackline breaks a rib, just be glad you are not hanging off the side.

OTOH, like everything else in sailing, there are compromises to be made, and one must make their own choices.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 12-02-2011
PCP's Avatar
PCP PCP is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal, West Coast
Posts: 16,162
Thanks: 21
Thanked 95 Times in 79 Posts
Rep Power: 10
PCP will become famous soon enough
a tether has about 1.5m. It cannot be smaller. If the boat is not big, when you go forward and are walking on the side, it will be enough for you to go overboard. You will not go far but you will stay in a position where I don't know if it is possible to get back to the boat, a dangerous position that can led to drowning.

When you use a tether and go forward you should have one hand for the boat an another for the tether, pulling it all the time to make it tight, without slack. that will permit you to have a very solid hold. when you reach the place where you are going to work, than you are not moving and can hook the theater in a place where you cannot go overboard (on the center of the boat). at least it is what I do

Regards

Paulo
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Jack lines flyingwelshman Gear & Maintenance 4 06-26-2011 12:13 PM
roll your own tethers janders Gear & Maintenance 33 08-19-2008 04:23 PM
Kids & Jack Lines? tmckinn Learning to Sail 9 06-28-2006 06:50 PM
Question bout Jack Lines mmccoy Gear & Maintenance 6 12-09-2004 02:09 PM
Safety Harnesses and Tethers John Rousmaniere Cruising Articles 0 05-06-1999 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:14 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.