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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #11  
Old 12-28-2011
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Two hooks on two lines. Hook the chain and winch. At the limit, use the other one/winch and continue.
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  #12  
Old 12-28-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt.aaron View Post
I've been sailing around with no engine all over the Key's, Bahama's and Western Caribbean for over 20 year's. Living aboard on the Hook and I've been raising 100' of 5/8 chain and a 45 pound Danforth by hand just like this a 1000 times. As soon as it's up, fall off and your under way. (Well, the engine came out in 93, but you know what I mean)
Do you really mean 5/8" chain?! I raise my 45#er by hand all the time with 50' of 3/8" chain. In 60' of water it's really a challenge, in 20' no sweat. As mentioned above, time it right to motor forward slowly, out of gear, drift forward to take out slack. If it does not break free easily, go back and pop it by motoring forward (or back) a bit more. Go up to the bow again and as soon as it's up off the bottom by 10' or so, you can slowly motor in a good direction if you need to before going up to haul it up all the way. You can even get it up to a point where it won't foul anything or chafe against the hull and let the forward motion wash off the mud, stop and haul in. I'll sail off sometimes but not when there are a lot of other boats around. Too many things can go wrong.
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Last edited by smurphny; 12-28-2011 at 02:11 PM. Reason: more
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  #13  
Old 12-28-2011
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After several years of variations on the theme of the keystone cops I finally installed a tiller pilot and that surely made several operations smoother, safer and more sailorly looking for the assembled crowds. Single handing is great, but when things get tight a silent, obedient crew is wonderful.
John
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  #14  
Old 12-28-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smurphny View Post
Do you really mean 5/8" chain?! I raise my 45#er by hand all the time with 50' of 3/8" chain. In 60' of water it's really a challenge, in 20' no sweat. As mentioned above, time it right to motor forward slowly, out of gear, drift forward to take out slack. If it does not break free easily, go back and pop it by motoring forward (or back) a bit more. Go up to the bow again and as soon as it's up off the bottom by 10' or so, you can slowly motor in a good direction if you need to before going up to haul it up all the way. You can even get it up to a point where it won't foul anything or chafe against the hull and let the forward motion wash off the mud, stop and haul in. I'll sail off sometimes but not when there are a lot of other boats around. Too many things can go wrong.
It's absolutely 5/8 chain. I bought it from a friend in need of some cash for 100 buck's. It seem's large, and it is. But when I anchor in 12 feet of water and put out 100 feet of that chain and my 45' anchor I do not worry. Set it and Forget it. I do not have an engine. A good heavy anchor system IS my insurance. You just get up there, sit, wedge your feet in good, and pull. When you get directly above it, pull faster, take a wrap when the anchor is "aweigh" fall off, and sail out of the anchorage. I've done it in all conditions, all times of day or night, with a lot of room and in tight anchorages. I've actually broken 3/8 chain in a storm when my anchor got hung good on some debris. When I got it up. there where links separated at the welds! On the 5/8 rig I put in a shock absorber made of a piece of 3 strand. Over here in the Key's, the Bahama's and Central America, there is never a reason to anchor in 60' of water. In those conditions you use a lot of line and a boat length chain.You need a 5:1 ratio. 60 foot of water is 300 feet of line.

Last edited by Capt.aaron; 12-28-2011 at 03:48 PM.
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Old 12-28-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccriders View Post
After several years of variations on the theme of the keystone cops I finally installed a tiller pilot and that surely made several operations smoother, safer and more sailorly looking for the assembled crowds. Single handing is great, but when things get tight a silent, obedient crew is wonderful.
John
A crew that know's you can do it better single handed than they can collectively will be quiet and obey. However, you must be quiet and calm when when directing them. The first sign of a captain that doesn't know what they are doing, is the tone they are using with their crew. The guy yell'n and blaming the crew, ought to be able to do any maneuver by himself. Therefore, he ought not be yell'n! And certainly should not be running the show.
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btrayfors will become famous soon enough btrayfors will become famous soon enough
I've anchored singlehanded about 80% of the time in the past 23 years or so. My boat is 42' LOA, weighs 28K lbs. Anchor is usually a 45lb CQR when out of the Chesapeake area, and a Fortress FX-37 when in home waters (Chesapeake).

No problem raising the anchor, though it sometimes takes some deft action when in close quarters.

I have an electric windlass (Lewmar Concept 2) with 200' of 3/8" G40 chain. The windlass has up/down buttons on the deck near the bow, and a remote up/down switch in the cockpit.

When the wind is really piping up, I generally use the engine to take in chain, using the switch in the cockpit judiciously. Sometimes, I power up toward the anchor, hit neutral, and move quickly to the bow where I take in more chain and watch what's happening. Sometimes takes a repeat trip or two until the bow is up-and-down over the anchor. Then, a gentle power forward or aft will break the anchor free, after which the electric windlass finishes the job.

I used to have a Simson-Lawrence manual windlass when in the Eastern Caribbean, but after one very dicey experience at Union Island with tons of boats around, a Christmas wind howling, and my younger-than-me crew just about having a heart attack getting the chain in with that windlass I decided it was time for a good electric windlass. Never been sorry, and never a moment's trouble with the windlass. Install 'em right and they'll do you proud for a long time.

Bill
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Old 12-28-2011
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Capt.aaron :

Rarely would I anchor, unless it is very calm.
I will try your hard-sheeted main idea next time.
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Old 12-28-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt.aaron View Post
It's absolutely 5/8 chain. I bought it from a friend in need of some cash for 100 buck's. It seem's large, and it is. But when I anchor in 12 feet of water and put out 100 feet of that chain and my 45' anchor I do not worry. Set it and Forget it. I do not have an engine. A good heavy anchor system IS my insurance. You just get up there, sit, wedge your feet in good, and pull. When you get directly above it, pull faster, take a wrap when the anchor is "aweigh" fall off, and sail out of the anchorage. I've done it in all conditions, all times of day or night, with a lot of room and in tight anchorages. I've actually broken 3/8 chain in a storm when my anchor got hung good on some debris. When I got it up. there where links separated at the welds! On the 5/8 rig I put in a shock absorber made of a piece of 3 strand. Over here in the Key's, the Bahama's and Central America, there is never a reason to anchor in 60' of water. In those conditions you use a lot of line and a boat length chain.You need a 5:1 ratio. 60 foot of water is 300 feet of line.
WOW! My back hurts just thinking about it But, as you say, you're not going to worry about slipping once it's set. I've been thinking about going to 200' (1/2 barrel) of 3/8" instead of the 50' so as not to worry about the nylon chafing on coral or anything else. Thinking of lifting 200' of it by hand has been the main reason I've not done it yet, as well as the ridiculous cost. I think staying with ACCO or a proven name is worth the extra cost (about $4.90 a foot). ACCO 3/8" G4 chain has a 5400# rating, more than my 35' will ever stress it. I do not have the power to support an electric windlass but will probably install a used manual windlass sooner or later if I see one for a good price.
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  #19  
Old 12-29-2011
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A cat claw, dual action windlass, with a line drum on the end is all anyone need's, and patients! I was raised on board by my Grandad since I was 10 .Lived aboard ever since. I've learned the bare bones, no crap that will break method's. Now I realize my body is most likely to break next as I just turned 41. All this manual chain haul'n is about to end as This year I'm puting in an engine, and a winch on the bow. It's nice know'n I don't need 'em. But will be nice to have 'em.
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