Superyacht sinks off Greece - Page 2 - SailNet Community

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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #11  
Old 02-23-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zeta View Post
The insurance kind.
They think the exhaust bellows blew out.
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  #12  
Old 02-23-2012
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I think the most worrisome part of this is the really sloppy recovery operation. After seeing the first guy go I think I would go over to the low side and jump into the water and swim to the life boat, or take my own boat with me. Did you see how it sped away (where to?) after the guy in the water let go of it?
I would like to hear from some of our Coast Guard members their take on the "rescue" operation.
John
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Old 02-23-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squidd View Post
Dang, I hope I get my deposit back.... I had it booked first week of July...
YOU had it booked that week??? That's the week I was supposed to have it!!

Ba$tard$!!! The double-booked us. Ya' just can't trust anyone these days.

In any case, it looks like I better cancel that order for 20 cases of BudLight and 50 pounds of bratwurst.
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Old 02-23-2012
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Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
I've said this before and fully understand the tax ruse. However, it always makes me feel like anyone that with a mega yacht and charters it out, can't actually afford it.

I get the tax deduction and depreciation, which is significant money. I also get that those deductions are available to the rich to encourage them to buy these yachts with their disposable income and keep thousands employees in the marine business. Imagine the cost to keep this boat for one night at your favorite expensive marina?

Still, it seems cheap to have to say it is for rent.
I know of a lot of people that own expensive second (or more) homes that rent them out short term. They do not have to do this as they could afford not to rent them out.

But that is how you get rich- Good business decisioins and live below your means.
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  #15  
Old 02-23-2012
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I can understand the good business decisions, but what's the point of living below your means...?

Your Rich Damn it...Live it Up..!!
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Old 02-23-2012
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Originally Posted by Squidd View Post
I can understand the good business decisions, but what's the point of living below your means...?

Your Rich Damn it...Live it Up..!!
Well, a "rich" person living below their means would be living well above any means the common person could ever dream of, it's all relative- and they are living pretty good- just want to make sure you don't run out of money. But think about it, this guy problably has as much fun tooling around in the mega yacht as we do tooling around on our little sail boats. So money really does not matter, as long as you got food to eat, and a dry place to sleep.
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Old 02-23-2012
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That means....I'm Rich...I'm Rich I tell Ya...!!
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Old 02-23-2012
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That means....I'm Rich...I'm Rich I tell Ya...!!
Cool, now you understand.
That book "Rich Dad Poor Dad" is a bunch of BS.
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Old 02-23-2012
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Originally Posted by ccriders View Post
I think the most worrisome part of this is the really sloppy recovery operation. After seeing the first guy go I think I would go over to the low side and jump into the water and swim to the life boat, or take my own boat with me. Did you see how it sped away (where to?) after the guy in the water let go of it?
I would like to hear from some of our Coast Guard members their take on the "rescue" operation.
John
Maybe the water temp is very cold? So diving in might be a bad idea?
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Old 02-23-2012
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News Dispatches ANALYSIS: ‘Mechanical failure’ is puzzling
Dispatches
ANALYSIS: ‘Mechanical failure’ is puzzling
Last Updated (23 February 2012) Written by Eric Sorensen
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Although no one knows how Yogi sank, attributing it to “mechanical failure” is curious. As a first defense against sinking, a well-found vessel relies on compartmentation, which divides it into many watertight sections by watertight bulkheads.

These bulkheads should have no penetrations below the point to which the vessel would settle when one, two or three compartments are completely flooded, depending on whether it is a one-, two- or three-compartment ship. A two-compartment ship, for example, is designed to stay afloat with adequate reserve buoyancy and stability in a damaged condition with two contiguous compartments completely flooded.

ship330On three-compartment Navy ships, a 15-degree “V” is drawn with its apex 4 feet above the damaged waterline, and the bulkhead must be watertight, with no penetrations, below this “V line.” If Yogi was built to this standard, with no penetrations below her V lines, it is difficult to understand how a single hull breach or mechanical failure anywhere in the hull could have sunk it unless a single breach somehow compromised two spaces and Yogi was built to a one-compartment standard.

What I find troubling while walking the docks at boat shows is the huge tender “garages” on these big yachts, with watertight doors leading forward to the machinery space or accommodations, depending on what is directly forward of the garage. If these doors are left open, progressive flooding is possible — or actually inevitable — under the right conditions. In a well-found vessel, these doors would not exist; you would have to climb up above the V-line level at each bulkhead, and then back down, to go from space to space.

Equally troubling are the hull windows that in recent yacht designs are getting both larger and closer to the waterline. Putting a window in a hull anywhere should be undertaken with extreme caution, but to put it in the lower half of the hull, in terms of freeboard, close to the static waterline, is at the very least inviting trouble. Risk may be mitigated by recessing the windows back from the hull sides, and by using thick glass, but it’s still a window near the waterline, and a break in structural continuity. Putting windows down low in a hull almost certainly compromises seaworthiness in favor of a great outside view from the lower deck accommodations. The hull is there first and foremost to keep the ocean out of the vessel, and intentionally introducing a series of weak points made of glass that compromise this vital function creates a vessel that I personally would have little confidence in out in heavy weather. While many owners would not know what a serious compromise to structural integrity such windows may represent, the vessels’ designers get paid to know better.

It seems to me that designers are tempting fate with designs such as this, just as the disproportionately outsized superstructures on modern cruise ships push dynamic stability to the margins, particularly when the vessel is damaged. The most seaworthy ships and boats tend to have large hulls and small superstructures, attributes that lower the center of gravity and decrease sail area, which in turn increases dynamic stability and survivability in heavy weather.

I emphasize dynamic over static stability because a modern over-decked cruise ship’s superstructure increases heel and roll due to the effect of wind and sea far more than a static stability test alone would indicate.
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